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June 21, 2018

Latest Headlines


Lake County Fair’s fare delivers a host of guilty pleasures


Entertainment


Lake County Fair’s fare delivers a host of guilty pleasures

There’s no doubt food is one of the Lake County Fair’s main attractions. With options to satisfy each and every craving, the fair can be called a taste of Lake County.

July 25 5:41 p.m.

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News


Youth corps gets to the root of Lake County conservation

Mosquitoes and poison ivy are just two of the challenges that accompany tasks like cutting paths through forests for new trails, or cultivating and transplanting native vegetation, or waging the ongoing war against buckthorn and other invasive plants.

July 17 2:05 p.m.

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Summer event series aims to bring new kids to CLC’s Lakeshore Campus


Entertainment


Summer event series aims to bring new kids to CLC’s Lakeshore Campus

The College of Lake County’s Lakeshore Campus is celebrating the season by hosting a new Summer Saturday Events series.

July 17 10:15 a.m.

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Latest Headlines

Goats Are Eating Our Poison Ivy, For the Children




An overgrown Hyde Park lot is becoming dinner for some lucky—and hopefully hungry—farm animals: goats are being brought in to eat the poison ivy that has taken over the space.

Southwest Boston Community Development Corporation’s Patricia Alvarez told WBZ that West Street Urban Wild had “so much poison ivy, it is unsafe for the youths.”

But it is safe for goats, Alvarez said. In fact, “they love it. It’s like candy.” Yum!


The goats are being provided by a Plymouth company that specializes in hungry goat rentals as an alternative to doing the yard work yourself or using chemicals, according to Boston Magazine. For the next eight weeks, four goats will be fenced in the lot and allowed to go to town on the toxic (to us) treats. Anyone may stop by to watch the goats in action, but visitors are being asked not to pet the goats, and especially not to feed them. They have work to do.

NECN noted that after eating the plants, the goats will “deposit a clean natural fertilizer back into the landscape.” So while your kids won’t be rolling in poison ivy, they might come in contact with a little bit of goat poop.

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Goats Are Eating Our Poison Ivy, For the Children

‘Unforgettable Cookies’

My 11-year-old athlete, Kyle, slowly walked into the kitchen, scratching like a monkey. “I think I have poison ivy, Mom,” he said with his head hanging low. It was miserable enough to be covered from head to toe in pink itchy blisters in mid-July, but what made it even worse was that his traveling basketball team was in their peak of summer activity with one of their largest tournaments just a day away. There wasn’t much I could say. His sad face made it obvious that he was already aware that it would be impossible for him to play in the tournament that Saturday.

To some, not being able to play in a recreational basketball tournament might not be a big deal, but for Kyle, basketball is his life. Since he’s been coordinated enough to dribble, he’s been in love with the sport. He plays nearly year round, participating in school teams, traveling teams and a random tournament here and there.

So, what’s a mom to do? My instructions to take an anti-itch oatmeal bath and then follow up with cotton balls and calamine lotion didn’t seem to be cutting it. Then I had an idea. “Why don’t I make some cookies?” There’s nothing like some of Mom’s homemade treats when you’re having a bad day.

I grabbed my apron and my favorite cookie recipe book and began to hunt for just the right cookie. Nothing really grabbed me. I decided instead to try a new recipe and dedicate it to Kyle’s poison ivy.

When the cookies came out of the oven, I put some on one of Kyle’s favorite childhood plates. I took them to the living room where he was sprawled watching television and declared, “Kyle’s Poison Ivy Cookies,” as I presented them to him. “I crossed out the name of the recipe in the cookbook and wrote in ‘Kyle’s Poison Ivy Cookies’ with today’s date and a short paragraph about you being covered with poison ivy.” His wide grin made me feel great.

Renaming cookie recipes has now become a tradition in our family. Whenever there’s a need, we bake some cookies and write our memories in the same cookbook. We have “I’m Bored Cookies,” our own rendition of Snickerdoodles, and “Celebrate Winter Break Cookies,” a twist on the average sugar cookie. Whatever the occasion, we name a new cookie, and we never fail to read through all the old ones too, reliving the memories we’ve baked up in years past.

Original article: 

‘Unforgettable Cookies’

GPM Pediatrics physician provides treatment, prevention tips on poison ivy

GPM Pediatrics physician provides treatment, prevention tips on poison ivy

Published on June 5, 2014 at 8:32 AM

Dr. Michael Gabriel, a Staten Island Pediatrician, provides advice on how to avoid poison ivy plants, and treat or prevent rashes.

According to an article published by KidsHealth.org, poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac all contain the same oily substance that causes rashes, urushiol. Recognizing oily plants during different parts of the year is important since they can look different depending on the season. Poison ivy can often be red during the spring, green during the summer and brown during the fall.

An allergic reaction to poisonous plants occurs for 60-80 percent of people within hours or as late as 5 days after coming in contact with a plant. Often time’s poison ivy can be prevented, according to the article. Avoiding areas where poison ivy is present is the key way in preventing poison ivy rashes, along with learning to identify plants, and wearing proper clothing when engaging in outdoor activity.

Dr. Michael Gabriel of GPM Pediatrics, a Staten Island pediatrics center, says that poison ivy season is in full swing. “Poison ivy can be very dangerous for children, especially because they have very sensitive skin. I advise parents to teach their children how to identify poisonous plants and the risks associated with them.” Gabriel urges parents to have their children shower after outdoor activity near plants but not to give baths. “Giving a bath can spread the oils around the tub and can make the condition worse.”

Dr. Gabriel says that once poison ivy is contracted, it is very difficult to get rid of and can be uncomfortable. “Calmine lotion is popular but has mixed results. If the condition gets severe for your child you must contact your local pediatrician to get the proper treatment,” Gabriel explains. “Be aware of any outdoor pets that your family has as well. Dogs often rub up against poison ivy and the oils can transfer to your kids.”

SOURCE GPM Pediatrics

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Posted in: Child Health News | Healthcare News

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GPM Pediatrics physician provides treatment, prevention tips on poison ivy

Staten Island Pediatrician Offers Treatment and Prevention Tips on Poison Ivy

BOHEMIA, N.Y., June 5, 2014 /PRNewswire-iReach/ — Dr. Michael Gabriel, a Staten Island Pediatrician, provides advice on how to avoid poison ivy plants, and treat or prevent rashes.

Photo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140604/94471

According to an article published by KidsHealth.org, poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac all contain the same oily substance that causes rashes, urushiol. Recognizing oily plants during different parts of the year is important since they can look different depending on the season. Poison ivy can often be red during the spring, green during the summer and brown during the fall.

An allergic reaction to poisonous plants occurs for 60-80 percent of people within hours or as late as 5 days after coming in contact with a plant. Often time’s poison ivy can be prevented, according to the article. Avoiding areas where poison ivy is present is the key way in preventing poison ivy rashes, along with learning to identify plants, and wearing proper clothing when engaging in outdoor activity.

Dr. Michael Gabriel of GPM Pediatrics, a Staten Island pediatrics center, says that poison ivy season is in full swing. “Poison ivy can be very dangerous for children, especially because they have very sensitive skin. I advise parents to teach their children how to identify poisonous plants and the risks associated with them.” Gabriel urges parents to have their children shower after outdoor activity near plants but not to give baths. “Giving a bath can spread the oils around the tub and can make the condition worse.”

Dr. Gabriel says that once poison ivy is contracted, it is very difficult to get rid of and can be uncomfortable. “Calmine lotion is popular but has mixed results. If the condition gets severe for your child you must contact your local pediatrician to get the proper treatment,” Gabriel explains. “Be aware of any outdoor pets that your family has as well. Dogs often rub up against poison ivy and the oils can transfer to your kids.”

GPM Pediatrics provides comprehensive pediatric care to children throughout the New York area with practices both in Brooklyn and Staten Island. Our board certified pediatricians and experienced staff help provide a very warm and nurturing environment for both you and your children. Our approach combines the latest treatment methods with the personal attention you should expect from your doctor. Simply put, we understand the importance of communication and trust and we are earning that trust one family at a time.

Media Contact: Scott Darrohn, GPM Pediatrics, 855-347-4228, takara@fishbat.com

News distributed by PR Newswire iReach: https://ireach.prnewswire.com

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Staten Island Pediatrician Offers Treatment and Prevention Tips on Poison Ivy

Calvin’s poison warning

Calvin Klein is apparently trying to deter nosy neighbours with warning signs about “poison ivy and ticks”.

The designer is reportedly determined to prevent interested passers-by from wandering around his $75 million property, which has been under construction for three years. During the summer, curious residents have been looking at the mansion in Southampton, New York, with some even driving past several times.

Insiders have told New York Post that signs have been erected outside the residence warning: “Caution, Poison Ivy and Ticks present: Do Not Enter.”

A representative for the fashion legend has explained Calvin is simply trying to protect his modern new home and ensure people stay safe.

“[Calvin Klein] has always had security at his houses over the years. Yes, there are signs warning of ticks because the deer are rampant out here and people are warning of late of the grave danger Lyme disease presents to anyone exposed,” the spokesman told the publication.

Calvin has also seemingly decided to beef up his security measures. He has hired a team of guards to patrol the grounds, with several men “in crisp white shirts and black pants” stationed at the end of his driveway.

In addition to the watchmen, cameras have also been set up in strategic positions around the estate.

One neighbour has described the minimalist glass and wood mansion as a “fortress”.

© Cover Media

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Calvin’s poison warning

Poison ivy It's getting stronger and tougher

Mark Laliberte is used to getting poison ivy, but the reaction he suffered in July was the worst ever.

The 37-year-old Candia man was clearing brush on his property when he slipped into some bushes.

“I didn’t see it, but once I fell into it, I knew it was poison ivy. I ran inside and showered, but it was too late. It was all over my face and neck, particularly on my left side,” he said.

Beth Almon’s doctor told her she has the worst case of poison ivy she’s ever seen. After battling the itch for three weeks, Almon is now on her second batch of Prednisone, a drug used to treat severe allergic reactions.

“This year, for some odd reason I can’t get rid of it out of my system,” said Almon, 32, of Raymond.

The reason for the severe cases may have something to do with changes in the poison ivy plant caused by higher levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, experts say.

Poison ivy is thriving and becoming much more potent, according to Lewis H. Ziska, a research weed ecologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Ziska has studied the effects of carbon dioxide on plants and has found that it’s changing the chemistry of the urushiol oil in poison ivy, making it more toxic and more likely to cause a skin reaction.

His research looked at how plants react to more sunlight appearing in forests that have become fragmented, especially in urban areas. Ziska found that poison ivy flourishes, spreading faster and becoming more potent.

“Poison ivy tends to do better than most of the plant species we looked at. It’s able to take in the additional carbon dioxide and convert it into additional growth,” he said.

While she hasn’t seen more poison ivy sufferers than usual, Dr. Ellen Bernard of Epping Regional Health Center said there are treatments available to ease the itching and clear things up. Topical steroids can be used, but more severe cases may require an oral steroid.

Susan Chadwick, director of marketing at Derry Medical Center, said she takes steps to avoid poison ivy, but still ended up with a case in July.

“I’m very sensitive to it, so I try like the devil to avoid it,” said Chadwick, whose colleague also suffered a severe reaction this summer and ended up on Prednisone.

jschreiber@newstote.com

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Poison ivy It's getting stronger and tougher

Itchapalooza 2013: Climate Change Fuels Poison Ivy Boom

It takes a Pennsylvania journalist to educate me on why so much poison ivy is growing along the paths and up the trees in my home state of New York this summer.

Global warming is literally changing the chemistry of poison ivy; experts believe it has doubled in strength since the 1960s.

According to the Pittsburgh ;Post-Gazette, it’s ;global warming, stupid! And apparently it’s a countrywide problem.

It also partially explains why there have been more bears walking through the backyard this summer, since they love to munch on the urushiol soaked leaves, the name for the oil or sap that lives on the skin of poison ivy and is such a pain for 85 percent of people.

An increase in carbon dioxide encourages plant growth like some kind of super fertilizer. And for some yet uncertain reason, poison ivy is proving especially greedy when it comes to CO2, sucking it down and spreading through fields and strangling trees at a record pace.

According to field studies by the Department of Agriculture, as long as CO2 levels keep rising, poison ivy will keep spreading, in some places virulently. It’s not just the number of plants that are growing, but also the potency of its poison. Global warming is literally changing the chemistry of the poison ivy; experts believe it has doubled in strength since the 1960s.

Poison ivy is not the only plant being impacted by global warming. Other studies, one by the biology department at Southwestern University in 2010, shows how an increase in CO2 increases photosynthesis in plants and encourages some to grow 30 to 40 percent faster. This is not necessarily a good thing. Even as they are growing faster, nitrogen levels in the plants are decreasing—as are othere important minerals including calcium, magnesium and phosphorous—which makes them drastically less nutritious for the herbivores (and man) that depend on them.

So, this is our future. Dirtier air and faster growing, evil-intended plants. I’m guessing next we’ll see news stories confirming that cockroaches and rats somehow thrive on increases in CO2. (Somewhat to the contrary, if you believe that superstorms, like Sandy, are encouraged by global warming they are proving to be hard on rat populations. The rat population in NYC went down post-Sandy, due to drowning.)

Be careful out there! Poison ivy’s ill effects aren’t only gained from brushing up against it in the woods. If its vines are burned or even churned up by weed whacker or lawn mower, the poisonous oil can become airborne and impact susceptible lungs.

What can you do about this advance, if you’re among the majority badly infected by poison ivy, the itchy, pimply blisters of which can last for several days?

First and foremost, learn to identify the plant. And then stay far away from it. Truth is, if you show the plant to most they mistake it for something innocuous, even marijuana.

Some Forest Service employees spray antiperspirant deodorant on exposed skin because the aluminum chlorohydrate may help prevent the oil from penetrating skin. (A human form of geo-engineering!)

At our house, where others are very susceptible, we keep a big, red bottle of Tecnu soap next to the sink all summer long and at the merest inkling of a brush-up there’s a rush for cold water and soap. (If you think you’ve made contact, move fast. The oil on the leaves, which is the ‘poison’ in poison ivy, often doesn’t sink into skin for about 15 minutes.) Jumping in a cold pond or pool is a possible instant remedy; Calamine lotion and ice can work after the fact.

It’s not like the measles or chicken pox. Apparently once you’ve had an allergic reaction to poison ivy you become even more at risk.

Original source: takepart.com

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Itchapalooza 2013: Climate Change Fuels Poison Ivy Boom

LADY GARDENER: Garden pests have arrived with the heat

Along with summer heat, garden pests arrive on the scene. In the last month, readers have been reporting damage from squirrels and rabbits as well as deer. Other pests that affect all gardeners are weeds and insects.

It’s frustrating to see weeds and poison ivy growing in the garden. After hours of work, they seem to reappear overnight. Carefully caged vegetables invite numerous animals to dinner.

Poison ivy has been especially tiresome this summer. Growing among pachysandra, it’s difficult to see until it towers over the surrounding foliage. I found one large cluster in a grouping of astilbe.

I won’t touch the poison ivy even with gloves. Occasionally my husband will come to the rescue but he’s usually busy with other garden chores. Our 13-year-old grandson earns spending money by helping but he, like me, is allergic to the plant.

One remedy I have used in the past is to mix a gallon of poison ivy herbicide, according to label directions, and paint it on the leaves with a paintbrush. This keeps the chemical in check and protects surround plants.

I also have a few techniques to control insects. A few insects on a stem can be removed by hand or by simply snipping the branch. Keep chemical use to a minimum. Spray only the targeted area and do not spray surrounding healthy plants and shrubs.

We are fortunate to have a significant frog population that keeps our garden almost free of insects. They hop underfoot and scurry to avoid the lawn mower. Outside the backdoor, I’ve placed a shallow bowl of water that attracts the frogs; however, we have to open the screen door slowly as not to harm the one that sleeps on the step.

Nut Sedge reappears every summer. This is the third summer I have treated the lawn with a chemical product specifically for nut sedge. As with any chemical, read the printed material especially the Do Not Spray list that includes vegetables, ornamentals, and garden flowers. If you feel you must spray, use it only on the lawn, not in the flower beds. When in doubt, call a professional service.

When applying any chemical, wear long pants, sleeves, gloves, and mask. If any chemical spills on your clothing, wash the item separately.

The Master Garden Display Garden, on the former State Hospital grounds, is absolutely beautiful. Visit any day. The garden is free and open to the public. Each garden has an identification box containing information sheets.

Take your camera, pen and notepaper to jot down the name of any perennial, annual, or shrub on your must-have list. In the gazebo garden, look for the limelight hydrangea covered in lime-yellow flowers. Nearby deep red hibiscus plants are truly magnificent. The all-American Selections garden features reliable plants available in area garden centers.

The new summer bulb garden, in its infancy, will be a highlight next year; however, it’s a good example how bulbs should be spaced for future growth.

My new email address has not been working, and I apologize to readers who have not receive a reply. I will answer your questions as soon as possible.

Garden dos the next two weeks:

n Check for fungi especially mildew.

n Thin thick clumps of flowers by pinching a few back to allow air circulation.

n Check out plant sales at local garden centers.

Originally from: 

LADY GARDENER: Garden pests have arrived with the heat

Things You Might Not Know About Poison Ivy

poison ivy.jpgJust the other day, a mother told me that her husband took the kids for a hike–through a whole bunch of poison ivy.

“So far, no rashes,” she said. “I keep checking.”

And she does need to keep checking–because the rash can show a week or longer later (usually with a first exposure), something this mom knew but lots of people don’t.

I’ve found that there are lots of other things that people don’t know about poison ivy. Here are a few:

There are different kinds of poison ivy–and it can look different at different times of year

. The adage “leaves of three, let them be” simply won’t keep you away from everything that can give you a poison ivy rash. The plants grow all over the US, so they are hard to avoid. The

Poison Ivy, Oak and Sumac Information Center

has lots of pictures.

You don’t have to touch it to get the rash. The toxin in the leaves, urushiol, escapes whenever the leaves are broken or bruised–and the toxin can get on things, like gloves, garden tools, and clothing. it can even get into the air if the stuff gets mowed or plowed. This is why…

You can get the rash from people or pets. If they have been the toxin on them, when you touch (or pet) them, you can get it too. Just to be clear: you can’t get the rash from someone’s rash–it’s not contagious that way. It’s the toxin from the plant that gives you the rash.

The best thing to do is to wash immediately. Take off any contaminated clothing, and wash with mild soap and water–as soon as you can. That’s the best thing you can do to get at least some of the urushiol off your skin, and make a reaction less likely. Remember to clean under nails, too.

There are various different rashes you can get from poison ivy. You can get bumps, scales, and various sizes of bubbles and blisters. Often they will be in a line or streak, showing where the plant touched the skin. However the rash looks, it’s usually red (although it can have black spots when the toxin stays on the skin and oxidizes)–and usually itches like crazy.

Treating the itch is all you usually need to do. Simple stuff, like oatmeal baths or cool compresses, can make a real difference. Anti-itch preparations that have menthol or phenol, like calamine, can also help–as can Burow’s solution or Domeboro. Interestingly, antihistamines like Benadryl don’t help all that much because of the way urushiol causes itching. Steroid creams may help if used early, but once there are any bubbles or blisters, they don’t help much.

Sometimes you need to take steroids–and if you do, you need to go off them slowly. In severe cases, taking steroids by mouth is needed–but if you do take them for just a few days, like we often prescribe in asthma, the rash can come back. So the recommendation is to lower the dose bit by bit over two or three weeks.

If you’re ever not sure about a rash, your doctor is your best resource. You should also call your doctor if a rash you think is poison ivy is on the face or genitals, is getting worse, gets very swollen or has pus coming out of it–and you should call if there is fever or the person with the rash seems ill.

Hope your summer is poison-ivy-free!

Is there something you’d like me to write about? Leave me a message on my Facebook page–and “like” the page for links to all my MD Mama blogs as well as my blogs on Thriving and Huffington Post.

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Things You Might Not Know About Poison Ivy

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