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July 20, 2018

'Gotham' Star Uses Villain Role to Keep Baby Brother in Line

Talk about a way to keep a young sibling in check.

Clare Foley, who plays Ivy Pepper in Fox’s Batman prequel “Gotham,” says she’s got her baby brother convinced that she is the future Batman nemesis ? and she’s using it to her advantage.

In an interview this week, the 13-year-old actress said she thinks “it’s kind of funny” that 4-year-old Declan, the youngest of her four brothers, truly believes that she and the character she plays ? the orphan daughter of the man framed for the murders of Bruce Wayne’s parents ? are one and the same.

Her mom says Declan was so frightened at one point that they had to assure him that his big sister was the “good Ivy.”

As for her other brothers, Foley laments that she doesn’t get the same respect. Also Batman fans, they think it’s “very cool” she has the role but she says they realize that “I’m just their sister.”

In “Gotham,” which airs Mondays at 8 p.m. EST, Ivy becomes homeless after her dad is shot dead by police and her mother commits suicide. The actress says this sets the stage for the hatred the one-day villain develops for the Dark Knight.

“We are seeing the beginning of that relationship,” says Foley.

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Online: http://www.fox.com/gotham/

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Follow Lauri Neff on Twitter at www.twitter.com/lneffist

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'Gotham' Star Uses Villain Role to Keep Baby Brother in Line

'Gotham' Star Uses Villain Role to Keep Baby Brother in Line

Talk about a way to keep a young sibling in check.

Clare Foley, who plays Ivy Pepper in Fox’s Batman prequel “Gotham,” says she’s got her baby brother convinced that she is the future Batman nemesis ? and she’s using it to her advantage.

In an interview this week, the 13-year-old actress said she thinks “it’s kind of funny” that 4-year-old Declan, the youngest of her four brothers, truly believes that she and the character she plays ? the orphan daughter of the man framed for the murders of Bruce Wayne’s parents ? are one and the same.

Her mom says Declan was so frightened at one point that they had to assure him that his big sister was the “good Ivy.”

As for her other brothers, Foley laments that she doesn’t get the same respect. Also Batman fans, they think it’s “very cool” she has the role but she says they realize that “I’m just their sister.”

In “Gotham,” which airs Mondays at 8 p.m. EST, Ivy becomes homeless after her dad is shot dead by police and her mother commits suicide. The actress says this sets the stage for the hatred the one-day villain develops for the Dark Knight.

“We are seeing the beginning of that relationship,” says Foley.

————

Online: http://www.fox.com/gotham/

————

Follow Lauri Neff on Twitter at www.twitter.com/lneffist

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'Gotham' Star Uses Villain Role to Keep Baby Brother in Line

Review: Jack and the Beanstalk (Clacton – panto)

The usual Jack and the Beanstalk villain in Darren Maddison’s version of the story is not the giant’s henchman Fleshcreep. Instead we have Poison Ivy, the thoroughly malevolent sister of Fairy Meadows. Natasha Brooke makes much of the part; this is a spirit with dangerous ambitions as well as an overdose of evil.

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Gemma Andrews is the horticultural Fairy Meadows; her magic only stretches so far, however. What the absent-minded King Bumble (Nik Wood-Jones) needs as a bright lad who will take on both Poison Ivy and her (nominal) boss Giant Blundebore.

That’s Paul Rich’s Jack Trott, at first a reluctant hero but fired by the chance of winning Millie Hillman’s Princess Jill. Harassed for her overdue rent by King Bumble (he’s also broke) and trying – without much success – to keep both Jack and Charlie Condou’s Simple Simon up to the mark is Richard Aucott’s Dame Trott.

Aucott has a marvellous succession of costume changes; I can’t recall ever seeing such a colour-coordinated Dame. The sets are a trifle fussy and the screening frieze which extends across the front of the stage hides the footwork of Andrews’ choreography for all the audience except in the highest rows of seats.

The accompaniment to the songs and dances is pre-recorded, which tends to throw up balance problems. Aucott, who has a very good voice, is most successful in overcoming these. The pelting of the giant by oversized (soft) green peas by the audience is a new but successful gimmick.

Jack and the Beanstalk runs at the Princes Theatre, Clacton until 3 January.

Continued: 

Review: Jack and the Beanstalk (Clacton – panto)

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