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June 22, 2018

Time to stop trusting ‘elitist mentality’

Dear Editor:

If our children today can see no future why can’t we fix that? Hearing talk of candidates we may have to vote for give us no faith in the future. Haven’t we seen enough of those lawyers back, money hungry, greedy, dishonest thieves?

This Poison Ivy league lawyer mentality we have walking thru our government and courthouse halls have become an embarrassment to the whole world. The last 50 years has been too much to bear. We all need to contribute our lives to the good of mankind and God’s green earth! We need to be able to have jobs, become more concerned for our children and the future of the world. If we cannot get a hold on our world, maybe we need to turn it over the our children whose future we have crafted.

We can no longer trust this elitist mentality. I know anything is better than what we have now. When we must arm our school teachers with guns to protect our children, we are losing out world to the devil.

Wm. Leroy Elwood

Osceola


View the original here – 

Time to stop trusting ‘elitist mentality’

Lincoln Woods project in Rutherford hits poison ivy snag again

Poison ivy grows on a tree in the Lincoln Woods off West Pierrepont Avenue. This photo was taken two weeks ago.

Staff photo/Jaimie Winters

Poison ivy grows on a tree in the Lincoln Woods off West Pierrepont Avenue. This photo was taken two weeks ago.

Poison ivy growing in the Lincoln Woods has once again posed a dilemma for volunteers and officials looking to turn the property into an educational park. Construction of pathways and benches are presently on hold to address the vegetation, as the Shade Tree Committee and borough discuss how to move forward.

The volunteer Shade Tree Committee and Lincoln School community have been working since 2010 to turn the 1.8-acre Lincoln Woods, located behind the Lincoln School between West Pierrepont and Vreeland avenues, into an outdoor learning center for the nearby Lincoln School. The property was designated a permanent open space Green Acres property in 1985. But the property has been over run with poison ivy.

Aiming for a less expensive option that would not involve widespread herbicide treatment, goats were deployed to the site in June 2013 and October 2012 to chomp on poison ivy and other growth. Lawrence Cihanek, owner of Green Goats in Rhinebeck, N.Y., and his bearded, hungry herd of 15 were hired to take out the weeds, clearing a good portion of the property. According to borough officials at the time, Rutherford paid $3,420 for each visit for the animals and fencing, paid for through fundraising by the school. Seasons have come and gone since, but the poison ivy has returned.

The next phase would involve construction of a pathway through the property. However, as council members noted at their most recent meeting, the site is presently overgrown with poison ivy. A trail that would run through the woods with a wooden boardwalk leading over a swampy patch of land near Carmita Avenue, some small clearings with logs for benches, informational signs identifying local flora and even a small semi-circle for outdoor lessons have been proposed. Site design was provided by a landscape designer through the New Jersey Meadowlands Commission (NJMC).

In his opinion, path work cannot begin until the poison ivy is cleared, Shade Tree Committee and DPW council liaison Jack Manzo said. On June 12, a lawn care contractor working for the borough inspected the site.

“We’re going to have to go in with a machine and clean it up or go in with heavy-duty weed wackers and do it by hand,” Manzo said. “With machines you have to be careful that you don’t take down little saplings hiding behind some of the growth, so it might be better to do it by hand.”

Manzo said it’s possible the work would be done over the course of the summer and likely done in-house by the Public Works Department.

In preparation for the next phase of the Lincoln Woods Project, the borough advertised and received bids for pending work. The highest was submitted by Atlas Tree Service at $20,800, the median bid by Sunset Ridge Landscaping at $16,500 and the lowest by Schule Landscaping at $8,800. A memo from the purchasing department indicated the lowest bidder Schule Landscaping attended a pre-quote meeting on May 9 and is aware of the work specification and project schedule.

As Manzo explained, the phase would involve installation of two winding, six-foot wide paths covered in woodchips that will meet towards the center with two different clearings with log benches. Access gates for the public and school will be included.

Due to the uncertainty raised by the poison ivy conditions, the council has yet to award a contract.

“This is a natural area, the idea is to have signage to stay on the trail and we want to have signage educating people about poison ivy, such as how to recognize it,” said Carol Hsu of the Shade Tree Committee. “It will never be poison ivy-free, it’s something we have to watch out for. It even happens in people’s backyards. I think there’s a difference of opinion on how much of the poison ivy must be cleared before the trail can be built.”

Bid specs recently advertised did include clearing of the ivy for the 6-foot-wide trails and border areas, for the safety of residents. The committee intends to ask the borough to spray herbicides between two and three times a year to eventually bring the ivy under control, a recommendation made by the NJMC and Shade Tree Department, Hsu said.

The Shade Tree Committee is comfortable with allowing the Department of Public Works to treat the site prior to the trail work starting, granted the next phase is only delayed a few weeks, Hsu said.

“We were hoping to have the trail in by summer, but we’d like to have something since a lot of people donated to this project, and we want them to be able to enjoy the property,” Hsu said.

Hsu is optimistic that the borough and committee can decide on the next step this week during their scheduled meeting, expressing optimism in the renewed communication due to Manzo’s attendance at their meetings. The previous liaison did not attend, she said.

Progress was also made in spring through hazard tree removal – ones at risk of falling and others that were infested with poison ivy, Hsu said.

Donations by the public and a state grant are planned to finance Lincoln Woods.

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection awarded a Green Acres grant for the Lincoln Woods and Memorial Field projects combined in early 2013.

Rutherford falls into our Densely Populated Municipality category, and therefore, is eligible for a 25 percent grant and up to a 75 percent loan, with a total estimate for both projects combined at $1.02 million, explained NJDEP spokesperson Robert Considine. The grant itself came to $256,000, and a loan of $194,000 was approved by the state.

In October 2013, the Rutherford Council passed a bond ordinance allocating $256,000 in general bonds for improvements at Memorial Field and Lincoln Woods together. A donation of about $15,000 was made this spring by the Rutherford Education Foundation for the woods project, and over the last few years, funding has also been raised by the Lincoln School PTA.

The Green Acres grant has yet to change hands from the state to Rutherford.

Read article here:

Lincoln Woods project in Rutherford hits poison ivy snag again

Woods hits poison ivy snag again

Poison ivy grows on a tree in the Lincoln Woods off West Pierrepont Avenue. This photo was taken two weeks ago.

Staff photo/Jaimie Winters

Poison ivy grows on a tree in the Lincoln Woods off West Pierrepont Avenue. This photo was taken two weeks ago.

Poison ivy growing in the Lincoln Woods has once again posed a dilemma for volunteers and officials looking to turn the property into an educational park. Construction of pathways and benches are presently on hold to address the vegetation, as the Shade Tree Committee and borough discuss how to move forward.

The volunteer Shade Tree Committee and Lincoln School community have been working since 2010 to turn the 1.8-acre Lincoln Woods, located behind the Lincoln School between West Pierrepont and Vreeland avenues, into an outdoor learning center for the nearby Lincoln School. The property was designated a permanent open space Green Acres property in 1985. But the property has been over run with poison ivy.

Aiming for a less expensive option that would not involve widespread herbicide treatment, goats were deployed to the site in June 2013 and October 2012 to chomp on poison ivy and other growth. Lawrence Cihanek, owner of Green Goats in Rhinebeck, N.Y., and his bearded, hungry herd of 15 were hired to take out the weeds, clearing a good portion of the property. According to borough officials at the time, Rutherford paid $3,420 for each visit for the animals and fencing, paid for through fundraising by the school. Seasons have come and gone since, but the poison ivy has returned.

The next phase would involve construction of a pathway through the property. However, as council members noted at their most recent meeting, the site is presently overgrown with poison ivy. A trail that would run through the woods with a wooden boardwalk leading over a swampy patch of land near Carmita Avenue, some small clearings with logs for benches, informational signs identifying local flora and even a small semi-circle for outdoor lessons have been proposed. Site design was provided by a landscape designer through the New Jersey Meadowlands Commission (NJMC).

In his opinion, path work cannot begin until the poison ivy is cleared, Shade Tree Committee and DPW council liaison Jack Manzo said. On June 12, a lawn care contractor working for the borough inspected the site.

“We’re going to have to go in with a machine and clean it up or go in with heavy-duty weed wackers and do it by hand,” Manzo said. “With machines you have to be careful that you don’t take down little saplings hiding behind some of the growth, so it might be better to do it by hand.”

Manzo said it’s possible the work would be done over the course of the summer and likely done in-house by the Public Works Department.

In preparation for the next phase of the Lincoln Woods Project, the borough advertised and received bids for pending work. The highest was submitted by Atlas Tree Service at $20,800, the median bid by Sunset Ridge Landscaping at $16,500 and the lowest by Schule Landscaping at $8,800. A memo from the purchasing department indicated the lowest bidder Schule Landscaping attended a pre-quote meeting on May 9 and is aware of the work specification and project schedule.

As Manzo explained, the phase would involve installation of two winding, six-foot wide paths covered in woodchips that will meet towards the center with two different clearings with log benches. Access gates for the public and school will be included.

Due to the uncertainty raised by the poison ivy conditions, the council has yet to award a contract.

“This is a natural area, the idea is to have signage to stay on the trail and we want to have signage educating people about poison ivy, such as how to recognize it,” said Carol Hsu of the Shade Tree Committee. “It will never be poison ivy-free, it’s something we have to watch out for. It even happens in people’s backyards. I think there’s a difference of opinion on how much of the poison ivy must be cleared before the trail can be built.”

Bid specs recently advertised did include clearing of the ivy for the 6-foot-wide trails and border areas, for the safety of residents. The committee intends to ask the borough to spray herbicides between two and three times a year to eventually bring the ivy under control, a recommendation made by the NJMC and Shade Tree Department, Hsu said.

The Shade Tree Committee is comfortable with allowing the Department of Public Works to treat the site prior to the trail work starting, granted the next phase is only delayed a few weeks, Hsu said.

“We were hoping to have the trail in by summer, but we’d like to have something since a lot of people donated to this project, and we want them to be able to enjoy the property,” Hsu said.

Hsu is optimistic that the borough and committee can decide on the next step this week during their scheduled meeting, expressing optimism in the renewed communication due to Manzo’s attendance at their meetings. The previous liaison did not attend, she said.

Progress was also made in spring through hazard tree removal – ones at risk of falling and others that were infested with poison ivy, Hsu said.

Donations by the public and a state grant are planned to finance Lincoln Woods.

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection awarded a Green Acres grant for the Lincoln Woods and Memorial Field projects combined in early 2013.

Rutherford falls into our Densely Populated Municipality category, and therefore, is eligible for a 25 percent grant and up to a 75 percent loan, with a total estimate for both projects combined at $1.02 million, explained NJDEP spokesperson Robert Considine. The grant itself came to $256,000, and a loan of $194,000 was approved by the state.

In October 2013, the Rutherford Council passed a bond ordinance allocating $256,000 in general bonds for improvements at Memorial Field and Lincoln Woods together. A donation of about $15,000 was made this spring by the Rutherford Education Foundation for the woods project, and over the last few years, funding has also been raised by the Lincoln School PTA.

The Green Acres grant has yet to change hands from the state to Rutherford.

Continued here:

Woods hits poison ivy snag again

Prevention and treatment options for bug bites and poison ivy this summer

With the summertime, comes increased outdoor activity, as well as increased exposure to things such as poison ivy and bug bites.

The majority of Americans are allergic to poison ivy; however, there are things we can do to prevent it from coming into contact with our skin, such as:

1. Knowing how to identify the plant – poison ivy has a cluster of three leaves at the end of a long stem. Hairy vines that you often see growing up the side of trees are also poison ivy.

2. Wearing gloves, long sleeves and pants if you are working outside, and washing them immediately after use.

Bug bites can also be quite the nuisance, and in some cases, quite dangerous. Tick bites, in particular, can cause serious health conditions such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever and Lyme disease.

To prevent tick bites, wear bug repellent spray containing at least 25 percent DEET when spending time outdoors.

In most cases, bug bites and poison ivy rashes can be treated at home using cold compresses and/or hydrocortisone cream to help with the itching.

However, if a rash from poison ivy lasts more than three weeks or if you begin experiencing high fever, achiness, a rash, fatigue and/or headache within a month of a tick bite, you need to seek medical attention.

Fortunately, Cone Health has an exceptional network of urgent care facilities throughout the area, from Kernersville to Mebane, dedicated to providing proper treatment to patients who have experienced a common summertime injury or health condition.

Spokesperson Background:
Dr. Laura Murray is an urgent care specialist at Mebane Urgent Care at Mebane Medical Park.

Dr. Murray received her Doctor of Medicine from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine in 1994. She completed her residency in internal medicine at The Ohio State University Department of Internal Medicine in 1997.

Originally posted here – 

Prevention and treatment options for bug bites and poison ivy this summer

Local plant walks show native knowledge

Anna Fialkoff can find something nice to say about any plant. Even poison ivy.

“It has beautiful fall color,” she said.

But that’s about the extent of her praise for the persistent plant, which takes on several different forms – vine, ground cover, shrub – and causes so many people so much discomfort.

Animals, however, said Fialkoff, are usually not allergic to the troublesome weed. Goats actually seem to eat it without a problem.

She did have more positive things to share about other wild plants – natives, weeds and invasive plants – during a recent Native Plant Walk she led at Old Frog Pond Farm, 38 Eldridge Road, in Harvard. A self-described “plant nerd,” Fialkoff grew up in Harvard, and has her graduate degree from Conway School in sustainable landscape design and planning. She is one of the farmers at Old Frog Pond Farm.

Participants in the walk were encouraged by Fialkoff “to feel and touch,” some of the plants.

“I’m a big believer in touching,” she said. “It is part of the identification process of the plant; it helps get ingrained into your psyche what the plant is like.”

As Fialkoff led those in attendance around Old Frog Pond, as well as the farm’s wooded and meadow areas, she pointed out different native species, talking about their medicinal and wildlife benefits.

“I’ve done a lot of thinking about the terms “invasives, pests, exotics,”” she said, noting that the use of certain words to describe plants often echoes one’s feelings about them. Some species, for example, are referred to as “invasives,” but actually are not.

Invasives, such as garlic mustard, crowd out other native plants; the area becomes a “mono-crop,” said Fialkoff.

But other invasives, like the multiflora rose, have some beneficial attributes, she said. The rose hips are high in Vitamin C; it has edible berries, and thick foliage, which hides and protects wildlife.

Another native plant, stinging nettle, sounds from its name as if it might be as troublesome as poison ivy, but actually has more benefits than deficits, she said. The plant, which grows in moist, rich soil (it is especially fond of the earth next to compost piles) has “hairs” with uric acid on their ends, which can cause a rash to unprotected skin.

But Fialkoff said some people intentionally invite the sting of the nettle: arthritis sufferers have found that it lessens their joint pain.

Once the plant is processed (boiled, steamed, dried), Fialkoff said, the nettle loses its “sting” and can be made into a tea, eaten like spinach or made into a pesto. The plant is quite nutritious, high in calcium and iron. Old Frog Pond farmer Linda Hoffman brews the tea in large quantities to spray on her apple orchard, to help boost its immune system, Fialkoff said. The tea is also a good remedy for allergy sufferers.

Jewelweed, an abundantly growing plant with soft, rubbery stems and a bright orange-yellow flower, offers a remedy of another kind: relief from poison ivy’s rash. Fialkoff described how to take the cut stem of the plant and rub the juice of it along the affected area. The plant, including stems, leaves and flowers can also be boiled down, she said, and the resulting orange water frozen in ice cube trays. Once frozen, the cubes can be rubbed over the rash, she said.

Another antidote to poison ivy is offered by the sweet fern. Not a true fern, Fialkoff said, but rather a woody shrub, the plant gives off a spicy, cinnamon smell. Tea made from the plant has a somewhat bitter taste, but is good for digestion and for urinary tract infections.

Fialkoff cautioned that many plants that have medicinal uses could also be toxic and recommended that medicinal plant usage be under the supervision of a clinical herbalist.

Those interested in a Native Plant Walk can contact Fialkoff at 978-456-9828.

More: 

Local plant walks show native knowledge

School Notes: Goats Bring National Recognition to Reading Elementary School

The fifth-graders at Reading, Vt., Elementary School, all six of them, may be small in number. Yet in developing an eco-friendly solution to removing the poison ivy at their school, they’ve embodied the famous Margaret Mead quote that hangs in their classroom: that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world.

That’s not to overlook the efforts of Sadie, Izzy and Happy, the three Boer goats who have consumed the poison ivy leaves on the school playground. But Abigail Merseal, Hayley Mullins, Kit Oney, Nevaeh Sullivan, Nick Bishop and Sam Mitchell evaluated the cost-efficiency and environmental impact of each plan, came up with the idea of using goats, and approached the principal and the Reading School Board for permission to let goats graze on the school grounds.

Not only have the goats gone a long way in eradicating the poison ivy problem, but the fifth-graders’ eco-conscious project contributed to Reading Elementary being named a Green Ribbon School by the U.S. Department of Education. Collins’ class travels to Burlington today to be recognized by Gov. Peter Shumlin as a recipient of the Governor’s Award for Environmental Excellence. And the class is currently raising the $4,000 needed for a trip to Washington, D.C., to be recognized with all 64 schools nationwide that received the Green Ribbon designation, awarded to schools that adopt energy efficient and environmentally savvy practices.

Besides the addition of the goats to the school’s ecosystem, Reading has a school garden where vegetables are raised for the cafeteria and food scraps are composted, and the school’s third- and fourth-grade class built a covered bridge over a stream that connects the school to a nearby woodlands area, used for environmental education.

The Green Ribbon designation has given a boost in morale to the small elementary school, which in the past has been targeted for closure.

“It not only validates the importance of the school in our community, it validates the importance of having children in a community school,” said Principal Lou Lafasciano, known as “Dr. Lou” around the school. “That community spirit is alive and well. That’s the kind of school everybody wants their child in.”

The poison ivy problem on the Reading Elementary playground could have been improved with a chemical solution, but that was not a road the fifth-graders wanted to take. “This was a wetland,” said fifth-grader Kit Oney. “And if we put chemicals in there, it would have killed a lot of animals.”

Instead, the students considered several different eradication methods that would not be harmful to the land and creatures around the school, or the students and faculty who spend their days there. They ruled out covering the poison ivy with black plastic, and pouring a vinegar and soapy water solutions and boiling water over the weed. A Google search for “cute ways to eradicate poison ivy” yielded information about using goats, who have special enzymes that allow them to safely eat the plant.

They were further encouraged when Dr. Lou told them that he’d heard on Vermont Public Radio of how Stephen Brooks, the cemetery commissioner in Charlotte, Vt., was deploying goats to ameliorate the poison ivy in the town’s cemeteries. The students took it upon themselves to call Brooks and gather information about implementing a similar program.

Finding a group of goats was no trouble . Malisa Williams, the sister of the third- and fourth-grade teacher at Reading, raises goats, but needed to let her land recover from their grazing for a few months. “She was willing to let her goats go for six weeks in the fall,” said fifth-grader Abigail Merseal. So Sadie, Izzy and Happy found new homes at the Reading Elementary playground, penned in by an electric fence, and with all the poison ivy they could want.

More difficult was compiling their research for a presentation to the Reading School Board, in order to secure permission to bring the goats to the school. They had to figure out what possible arguments board members might raise, and come up with alternate plans in case any part of their proposal was rejected. “It was — how should I put this …” Sam Mitchell began.

“Nervewracking,” Nick Bishop interjected.

“Good one,” Sam continued. “We were nervous, but we did a good job.” At present, the goats have consumed one-and-a-half acres of poison ivy on the school grounds, and the students have received a grant for $907 from the Woodstock Union High School Foundation to purchase supplies like a goat shelter to keep the goats at the school.

And, if the class manages to raise $4,000 in the coming weeks, they’ll travel to the White House with the other Green Ribbon School recipients; about $3,500 has been raised thus far

“A little class is going to Washington, D.C.,” said fifth-grader Nevaeh Sullivan. “If we were at some other school, this probably would never happen.”

To make that trip happen, though, the class is once again looking to the community to lend a hand. To donate, visit www.razoo.com/story/Green-Goat-5th-Graders-Go-To-Washington.

Achievements

Susannah Howard, a sophomore at Thetford Academy, was accepted to MedQuest 2013, a program at Lyndon State College that exposes students to health care career options through job shadowing and training in medical procedures like CPR. MedQuest 2013 will be held from July 14 to 19.

∎ Yuzhou “Oscar” Lin, a student at Thetford Academy, was named one of nine statewide winners in the Vermont State Mathematics Coalition’s 20th annual Talent Search. Lin was honored with fellow recipients at a dinner in South Burlington last month and is invited to attend the Governor’s Institute in Mathematical Sciences this summer at no charge.

Graduations

Kelsey L. Jordan of Lebanon graduated from Northeastern University with a bachelor’s degree in biology, magna cum laude.

School Notes appears most Tuesdays. Email news and announcements to schoolnotes@vnews.com.

Source:

School Notes: Goats Bring National Recognition to Reading Elementary School

Goats Bring National Recognition to Reading Elementary School

The fifth-graders at Reading, Vt., Elementary School, all six of them, may be small in number. Yet in developing an eco-friendly solution to removing the poison ivy at their school, they’ve embodied the famous Margaret Mead quote that hangs in their classroom: that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world.

That’s not to overlook the efforts of Sadie, Izzy and Happy, the three Boer goats who have consumed the poison ivy leaves on the school playground. But Abigail Merseal, Hayley Mullins, Kit Oney, Nevaeh Sullivan, Nick Bishop and Sam Mitchell evaluated the cost-efficiency and environmental impact of each plan, came up with the idea of using goats, and approached the principal and the Reading School Board for permission to let goats graze on the school grounds.

Not only have the goats gone a long way in eradicating the poison ivy problem, but the fifth-graders’ eco-conscious project contributed to Reading Elementary being named a Green Ribbon School by the U.S. Department of Education. Collins’ class travels to Burlington today to be recognized by Gov. Peter Shumlin as a recipient of the Governor’s Award for Environmental Excellence. And the class is currently raising the $4,000 needed for a trip to Washington, D.C., to be recognized with all 64 schools nationwide that received the Green Ribbon designation, awarded to schools that adopt energy efficient and environmentally savvy practices.

Besides the addition of the goats to the school’s ecosystem, Reading has a school garden where vegetables are raised for the cafeteria and food scraps are composted, and the school’s third- and fourth-grade class built a covered bridge over a stream that connects the school to a nearby woodlands area, used for environmental education.

The Green Ribbon designation has given a boost in morale to the small elementary school, which in the past has been targeted for closure.

“It not only validates the importance of the school in our community, it validates the importance of having children in a community school,” said Principal Lou Lafasciano, known as “Dr. Lou” around the school. “That community spirit is alive and well. That’s the kind of school everybody wants their child in.”

The poison ivy problem on the Reading Elementary playground could have been improved with a chemical solution, but that was not a road the fifth-graders wanted to take. “This was a wetland,” said fifth-grader Kit Oney. “And if we put chemicals in there, it would have killed a lot of animals.”

Instead, the students considered several different eradication methods that would not be harmful to the land and creatures around the school, or the students and faculty who spend their days there. They ruled out covering the poison ivy with black plastic, and pouring a vinegar and soapy water solutions and boiling water over the weed. A Google search for “cute ways to eradicate poison ivy” yielded information about using goats, who have special enzymes that allow them to safely eat the plant.

They were further encouraged when Dr. Lou told them that he’d heard on Vermont Public Radio of how Stephen Brooks, the cemetery commissioner in Charlotte, Vt., was deploying goats to ameliorate the poison ivy in the town’s cemeteries. The students took it upon themselves to call Brooks and gather information about implementing a similar program.

Finding a group of goats was no trouble . Malisa Williams, the sister of the third- and fourth-grade teacher at Reading, raises goats, but needed to let her land recover from their grazing for a few months. “She was willing to let her goats go for six weeks in the fall,” said fifth-grader Abigail Merseal. So Sadie, Izzy and Happy found new homes at the Reading Elementary playground, penned in by an electric fence, and with all the poison ivy they could want.

More difficult was compiling their research for a presentation to the Reading School Board, in order to secure permission to bring the goats to the school. They had to figure out what possible arguments board members might raise, and come up with alternate plans in case any part of their proposal was rejected. “It was — how should I put this …” Sam Mitchell began.

“Nervewracking,” Nick Bishop interjected.

“Good one,” Sam continued. “We were nervous, but we did a good job.” At present, the goats have consumed one-and-a-half acres of poison ivy on the school grounds, and the students have received a grant for $907 from the Woodstock Union High School Foundation to purchase supplies like a goat shelter to keep the goats at the school.

And, if the class manages to raise $4,000 in the coming weeks, they’ll travel to the White House with the other Green Ribbon School recipients; about $3,500 has been raised thus far

“A little class is going to Washington, D.C.,” said fifth-grader Nevaeh Sullivan. “If we were at some other school, this probably would never happen.”

To make that trip happen, though, the class is once again looking to the community to lend a hand. To donate, visit www.razoo.com/story/Green-Goat-5th-Graders-Go-To-Washington.

Achievements

Susannah Howard, a sophomore at Thetford Academy, was accepted to MedQuest 2013, a program at Lyndon State College that exposes students to health care career options through job shadowing and training in medical procedures like CPR. MedQuest 2013 will be held from July 14 to 19.

∎ Yuzhou “Oscar” Lin, a student at Thetford Academy, was named one of nine statewide winners in the Vermont State Mathematics Coalition’s 20th annual Talent Search. Lin was honored with fellow recipients at a dinner in South Burlington last month and is invited to attend the Governor’s Institute in Mathematical Sciences this summer at no charge.

Graduations

Kelsey L. Jordan of Lebanon graduated from Northeastern University with a bachelor’s degree in biology, magna cum laude.

School Notes appears most Tuesdays. Email news and announcements to schoolnotes@vnews.com.

Read this article: 

Goats Bring National Recognition to Reading Elementary School

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