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August 16, 2018

Leaves of three, let it be

Leaves of three, let it be

Time to call Poison Ivy Gone

Published Aug 28, 2014 at 9:35 pm
(Updated Aug 28, 2014)

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Photos

  • Poison Ivy

  • Poison Ivy Gone workers dig up the plants and remove them.

  • The van says it all.

Things you may not know about poison ivy – but should
Urushiol (u-ROO-she-ol), the culprit in poison ivy, is found in leaves, stems and roots of the plant.
Three out of four people who come in contact with urushiol will develop a rash, an allergic dermatitis.
The first contact with urushiol often does not cause a reaction. However, the immune system goes on the defense and the next contact will result in an allergic reaction.
Skin must come in direct contact with the oil to be affected but it can be spread by contaminated hands, clothing, tools, sporting equipment, etc. The contamination can last for five years. The blister fluid does not spread the rash.
Symptoms, 12-48 hours after exposure: redness, itching, swelling, streaky or patchy rash, red bumps, blisters, sometimes oozing. Typically lasts 5-12 days, 30 days or longer in severe cases.
Medical attention is needed if there is a rash on face, lips, eyes or genitals, severe swelling, difficulty in breathing or a widespread reaction.
Never burn poison ivy. While the oil cannot be inhaled from the plant, burning results in toxic smoke that can cause a serious reaction in the lungs, nasal passages and throat.
Urushiol oil remains in the stems of poison ivy for years after the plant dies.
To prevent infection after contact, shower in cool water as soon as possible. Wash toys and tools in soap and cold water.

BY GINNY RAUE
You went to sleep fine last night but woke up this morning with blisters and itching skin. Sure, you were weeding yesterday but you had on your garden gloves. So how did you get poison ivy?

According to George Louvis, the marketing director for Poison Ivy Gone, your cloth gloves act like a sponge, absorbing the urushiol oil in poison ivy, increasing the amount of oil that comes in contact with your skin and making your allergic reaction even worse.

Poison Ivy Gone
Oakland, New Jersey
Free estimates available
973-790-3638
http://www.poisonivygone.com
Business hours: Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Closed Sat. and Sun.

Based in Oakland, Poison Ivy Gone has over 28 years of experience in professionally removing poison ivy in Northern New Jersey but they have also worked in Orange and Rockland counties, Pennsylvania and South Jersey. They service residential and commercial properties as well as others sites, such as country clubs, playgrounds and schools. They are Service Award winners on Angie’s List.

“She comes on like a rose, but everybody knows, she’ll get you in Dutch….”

Louvis reports that poison ivy starts to grow in the spring and he said this year’s weather conditions created the perfect storm.

“It’s a weed, so there’s not much that stops its growth. It’s a vicious and invasive plant and it doesn’t take a lot for it to take over,” he said.

Poison ivy can grow anywhere but usually pops up around the borders of your property or near the house. It roots well in mulch, flower beds and woods, where there is little activity, and tends to shoot off in many directions.

“It’s very aggressive and it spreads in two ways; along the ground, where it gets longer and bigger and then every so often it shoots vertical. That’s when it reproduces and drops seeds. When it starts climbing it’s getting ready to have babies,” he said.

Your dog can take a walk on the wild side in poison ivy and suffer no ill effects, but once you pet your furry friend, who carries the oil on his coat, you’re in trouble. Backyard birds are also culprits in the itchy world of poison ivy. They ingest the berries of the plant and as they do a fly-over they pass the seeds, perfectly encased in their own little sack of fertilizer. No harm intended, but now you are in deep doo-doo and have a good chance of becoming a host property for poison ivy.

“You can look but you’d better not touch….”

Attempting to eliminate poison ivy with a lawn mower or weed whacker only succeeds in spreading the oil on the grass, in the bushes, on your shoes and pant legs. Your tools are also contaminated for the next five years unless they are properly cleaned. And it gets worse.

“When your kids play in the yard the oil is all over the lawn,” Louvis said.

“She’s pretty as a daisy, but look out man, she’s crazy….”

Poison ivy is easiest to identify from April to October. It goes dormant after the fall, but doesn’t die and you can still get a rash in the dead of winter. While the leaves remain is the best time to call Poison Ivy Gone.

“It’s never a do-it-yourself job. Our guys recognize it, figure out where it’s coming from, remove it completely and show you how to keep it from coming back,” Louvis said.

Poison Ivy Gone’s preferred method is to remove it by hand, just beneath ground level, or in the case of significant infestation, by machine.

Sometimes customers prefer the use of an herbicide to protect certain plants from harm. In that case, Poison Ivy Gone technicians use a paint brush to apply the herbicide to the poison ivy leaves, killing off the noxious plant only.

“They are skilled and careful and we are licensed to use herbicides,” Louvis said.

“You’re gonna need an ocean of calamine lotion….”

Poison Ivy Gone technicians know how to protect themselves so they’re not scratching like a hound the minute they mess around with poison ivy.

“The guys are basically in haz-mat suits. They take an oral product and use a cream on their skin. The suits are destroyed afterwards; you can’t re-use anything in this business,” Louvis said.

Poison Ivy Gone removes the poison ivy from the ground then carts it away from your property to a secure location.

And then the Poison Ivy is Gone.

Sources: http://lyricksfreak.com – “Poison Ivy” by the Coasters, 1959; http://www.mayoclinic.org; http://my.clevelandclinic.org;

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Leaves of three, let it be

Poison Ivy and Other Summer Skin Irritants

Started by Dana Sparks (@danasparks) · Mon, Jun 30 at 3:34pm EDT

Poison Ivy and Other Summer Skin Irritants

close up of three leaf poison ivy

Poison ivy grows as vines or low shrubs in most climates. Each leaf on a poison ivy plant has three smaller leaflets. Contact with any part of the poison ivy plant can cause red, swollen skin; blisters; and severe itching, sometimes within hours after exposure.

A poison ivy rash usually resolves on its own within a few weeks. In the meantime, control itching with an over-the-counter anti-itch cream, such as calamine lotion or hydrocortisone cream. An oatmeal bath and cool compress also might be helpful. Consult your doctor if you have a severe poison ivy rash or if the rash involves your eyes, face or genital area. Poison oak and poison sumac cause a similar rash.

Read More: Poison Ivy and Other Summer Skin Irritants

chigger bites Heat Rash Lyme disease poison ivy skin irritants Swimmers itch

Continued here – 

Poison Ivy and Other Summer Skin Irritants

5 Myths About Treating Poison Ivy Rashes

5 Myths About Treating Poison Ivy Rashes

Sam here from Itch Juice Poison Ivy Treatment.

In this post, we’ll outline 5 myths we have found online about the treatment of poison ivy rashes. It’s amazing what some people will do to cure this awful, awful rash…but we’re here to tell you what REALLY works.

Myth #1 – You need to touch poison ivy to get a rash
A common misunderstanding that we hear and see all the time is that people think they need to come into physical contact with a poison ivy plant to fall victim to a poison ivy rash or outbreak. This is not true.

Many of our customers have returned from hikes and camping trips without ever touching a single poison ivy plant, but have suffered from ugly red welts and painful itching. If you are allergic to poison ivy and you’re near a plant, you run the risk of a poison ivy rash breakout.

The myths we have outlined below could result in further, long term damage of your skin. Please note – this article has been compiled for entertainment purposes only and we do not recommend using ANY of the treatment methods outlined below.

Myth #2 – Homemade remedies are your only option
We have found dozens of homemade remedies online that sound like methods for washing dishes, rather than addressing a poison ivy rash. Here’s an example for you:

Step 1 – apply dish washing liquid to the affected area
Step 2 – let it dry
Step 3 – apply baking soda to the area
Step 4 – apply vinegar to the area
Step 5 – expect a chemical reaction
Step 6 – remove this from the skin
Step 7 – wait 3 – 4 hours for rash to subside

Not only does this sound like a hair-brained science experiment, but it seems like a lot of effort and long waiting time for dealing with poison ivy rash. We think that poison ivy treatment should be an easy fix.

Myth #3 – Calamine lotion is the only remedy that works.
Err – wrong! We have tested dozens of the remedies that we’ve found online, including cold compresses and all of our competitor’s products.

We have found that different people have different reactions to treatment and there are a number of variables that can affect this. These variables include skin sensitivity, proximity to plant and time taken to treatment. It pays to keep an open mind about ways to treat rashes from poison ivy.

Myth #4 – Rest pennies in vinegar to create a magical chemical compound.
This is ACTUAL advice we found by looking through online forums. One reader claimed that soaking 40 pennies in a cup of vinegar and creating a chemical compound from this concoction would result in a magical cure. This is an old wive’s tale and is simply incorrect.

There is so scientific evidence to back this claim and unless you’re a chemist or like to perform science

experiments with your skin as the test subject, we strongly advise you avoid his method of poison ivy treatment.

Myth #5 – Using gasoline or bleach on your skin is a poison ivy cure.
This is another ludicrous and downright dangerous claim.

Let’s take a moment to consider the implications and danger of pouring gasoline or bleach on yourself or a member of your family. There are critical risks involved in doing this, including accidental ingestion, exposure to eyes or sensitive areas of skin and of course, the fact that gasoline is a flammable liquid.

Please do not ever try this at home.

If you’re interested in a poison ivy treatment that actually works, check out Itch Juice. It’s the ONLY product that actually guarantees results in 24 hours…or your money back.

We’re so confident our product works that we offer a 30 day, 100% money back refund with no questions asked if you’re not 100% happy.

You’re gonna need an ocean of calamine lotion – poison ivy

Poison Ivy


Gloucester County Nature Logo

Have you just finished spring cleaning your garden? Forgot to wear gloves? And now you have patches of an itchy rash and tiny blisters on your hands and arms?

Hmmm. Maybe you also forgot to notice the smooth stems and tiny, shiny newly-unfolding three-parted leaves of poison ivy.

Too bad; not much you can do about it. There are over-the counter remedies that will dry up the blisters and tone down the itch. Really serious cases can be treated with steroids. Cool compresses can help.

poison ivy

But in any case, the rash will clear up in a week or two, it’s not contagious, and it won’t spread from the area of origin.

Poison ivy grows from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico and from the Atlantic Coast to Texas. It is common everywhere in New Jersey, except in the Pine Barrens, where it generally grows only on the disturbed soils around home and industrial sites.

It can grow as a ground cover about a foot high, a vine, and even as a shrub. As a vine, it gets quite large, with stems several inches in diameter that cling to the bark of a tree with hundreds of short rootlets. So if you see a big hairy-looking vine climbing a tree, that’s poison ivy.

“Leaves of three, let it be” is a wise maxim for those who want to identify the plant. The individual leaves are two to four inches long, and they grow in groups of three.

The central leaflet is usually quite symmetrical; that is, the halves of the leaf on either side of the midrib are identical. The lateral two leaflets are most often asymmetrical, wider on one side of the midrib than the other.

poison ivy

All of the leaves may have a few shallow blunt lobes. The species most commonly confused with poison ivy are Virginia creeper (which has leaflets in groups of five) and some of the low-growing blackberries (leaves have lots of small sharp teeth, and the stems are thorny or bristly.)

The flowers of poison ivy are small, green, and grow in small clusters beneath the leaves. The fruits are small white berries.

The chemical that causes the allergic reaction to poison ivy is called uroshiol, and it does not affect everybody. This substance is also present in poison oak and poison sumac, two much less common local plants.

Poison oak looks much like poison ivy, but its leaves are more deeply lobed and it grows only as a ground cover, not a vine.

Poison sumac is a small wetland tree with compound leaves, which gives it a slight resemblance to the harmless staghorn, smooth, and shining sumacs.

Those three species have flowers and fruits that form large clusters at the ends of branches but poison sumac flowers and fruit are similar to those of poison ivy.

For information about the Gloucester County Nature Club, see gcnatureclub.org/.

poison ivy

poison ivy

Poison Ivy

Poison Ivy

New Allegra- Anti-Itch Cream Introduced by Sanofi-Chattem for Poison Ivy and Itchy Skin

New Allegra- Anti-Itch Cream Introduced by Sanofi-Chattem for Poison Ivy and Itchy Skin

Allegra Anti-Itch Cooling Relief Cream and Allegra Anti-Itch Intensive Relief Cream are now available in drug, grocery and mass merchandiser stores nationwide. Chattem, Inc., the Consumer Healthcare Division of Sanofi US and the makers of Allegra Allergy, introduced the Anti-Itch Creams to its family of products to help provide itch relief from reactions to skin irritations.

Allegra Anti-Itch Cooling Relief provides fast cooling relief for hot, itchy skin while Allegra Anti-Itch Intensive Relief provides moisturizing relief for itchy skin or dry and irritated skin. Both products provide temporary relief from the pain and itching associated with insect bites, minor skin irritations, sunburn, rashes due to poison ivy, poison oak or poison sumac, and minor cuts and scrapes. They also temporarily protect and help relieve chapped or cracked skin.

“We identified an opportunity in the topical anti-itch category and leveraged our experience with Allegra Allergy to introduce a new product for common skin irritations that not only helps stop the itch but also provides a moisturizing benefit,” said John Stroud, Executive Vice President, Marketing, Chattem.

Itchy skin can be triggered by a chemical in a person’s body called histamine. Histamine is a person’s immune system reacting to an irritant, like an insect bite or poison ivy. Allegra Anti-Itch Cream acts as an antihistamine, going beneath the surface of the skin to stop the itch at its source. In addition, the moisturizers and vitamins A, C and E in Allegra Anti-Itch Cream help soothe the skin, and the allantoin protects the skin while it gets back to normal after scratching.

Allegra Anti-Itch Cream is indicated for adults and children ages 2 and up. The suggested retail price is $4.99-$6.99. For additional information on the Allegra family of products, please visit www.allegra.com. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

anit-itch poison ivy itchy skin
New Allegra- Anti-Itch Cream Introduced by Sanofi-Chattem for Poison Ivy and Itchy Skin

About Allegra®
Allegra Allergy has been providing allergy sufferers with relief of symptoms from indoor and outdoor allergies for more than 15 years. The Allegra family of products is available without a prescription in drug, grocery, mass merchandiser and club stores nationwide.

About Sanofi
Sanofi, a global and diversified healthcare leader, discovers, develops and distributes therapeutic solutions focused on patients’ needs. Sanofi has core strengths in the field of healthcare with seven growth platforms: diabetes solutions, human vaccines, innovative drugs, rare diseases, consumer healthcare, emerging markets and animal health. Sanofi is listed in Paris (SAN) and in New York (SNY).

Sanofi is the holding company of a consolidated group of subsidiaries and operates in the United States as Sanofi US, also referred to as sanofi-aventis U.S. LLC. For more information on Sanofi US, please visit http://www.sanofi.us or call 1-800-981-2491.

About Chattem
In March 2010, Chattem, Inc. became a wholly-owned subsidiary of the sanofi-aventis Group, as the consumer healthcare division of Sanofi US. Chattem is more than 130 years old and is a leading manufacturer and marketer of branded consumer healthcare products, toiletries and dietary supplements across niche market segments in the United States. For more information, please visit Chattem’s website at www.chattem.com

Forward Looking Statements

anti-itch poison ivy itchy skin
New Allegra- Anti-Itch Cream Introduced by Sanofi-Chattem for Poison Ivy and Itchy Skin

This press release contains forward-looking statements as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, as amended. Forward-looking statements are statements that are not historical facts. These statements include projections and estimates and their underlying assumptions, statements regarding plans, objectives, intentions and expectations with respect to future financial results, events, operations, services, product development and potential, and statements regarding future performance. Forward-looking statements are generally identified by the words “expects”, “anticipates”, “believes”, “intends”, “estimates”, “plans” and similar expressions. Although Sanofi’s management believes that the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are reasonable, investors are cautioned that forward-looking information and statements are subject to various risks and uncertainties, many of which are difficult to predict and generally beyond the control of Sanofi, that could cause actual results and developments to differ materially from those expressed in, or implied or projected by, the forward-looking information and statements. These risks and uncertainties include among other things, the uncertainties inherent in research and development, future clinical data and analysis, including post marketing, decisions by regulatory authorities, such as the FDA or the EMA, regarding whether and when to approve any drug, device or biological application that may be filed for any such product candidates as well as their decisions regarding labeling and other matters that could affect the availability or commercial potential of such product candidates, the absence of guarantee that the product candidates if approved will be commercially successful, the future approval and commercial success of therapeutic alternatives, the Group’s ability to benefit from external growth opportunities, trends in exchange rates and prevailing interest rates, the impact of cost containment policies and subsequent changes thereto, the average number of shares outstanding as well as those discussed or identified in the public filings with the SEC and the AMF made by Sanofi, including those listed under “Risk Factors” and “Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” in Sanofi’s annual report on Form 20-F for the year ended December 31, 2011. Other than as required by applicable law, Sanofi does not undertake any obligation to update or revise any forward-looking information or statements.

New Allegra- Anti-Itch Cream Introduced by Sanofi-Chattem for Poison Ivy and Itchy Skin

New Allegra- Anti-Itch Cream Introduced by Sanofi-Chattem for Poison Ivy and Itchy Skin

New Allegra- Anti-Itch Cream Introduced by Sanofi-Chattem for Poison Ivy and Itchy Skin

Get ready for spring with tips and advice on sunburns, bee stings, poison ivy, allergies

Get ready for spring with tips and advice on sunburns, bee stings, poison ivy, allergies

poison ivy allergies bee stings

GENESEE COUNTY, MI – The warm weather and sunshine finally
seem to be showing up more frequently these days.

Being outdoors and taking advantage of the springtime
weather is great, but this time of the year also brings worries of sunburn, bee stings, poison ivy and allergies.

Health officials in Genesee County have some advice on the springtime
topics and offer some tips about staying comfortable outside:

Sunburns

No, it’s not summer yet. But once the snow melts and the sun
starts to shine, it’s time to think about being protected from the sun, said Dr.
Robert Soderstrom, a Flint Township dermatologist.

People haven’t had to worry about sun exposure all winter,
so oftentimes they forget to worry about it when the weather first starts to
get nice, he said.

“As people go into the spring and summer, we caution people
about sun exposure. People forget,” Soderstrom said. “People have gone months
without any exposure. It doesn’t take much sun for people to burn sometimes.”

From the first of May to the end of September, people should
think about sun protection, he said. Wearing hats, covering up the skin with
clothing and using a sunscreen with at least 15 SPF are ways to protect again
the sun.

As more people begin running, biking and exercising outside,
it’s best to get out before 10 a.m. or after 2 or 3 p.m., when the sun is not at its peak in the sky, Soderstrom said.

“No sunburn is safe,” he said. “A lot of it is just common
sense. We ask people to keep it in mind.”

Bee stings

This is the time that bees start waking up, but a single
sting with minor swelling isn’t anything to worry about, local physicians said.

If someone, however, starts to have trouble breathing, they
become dizzy, get hives or their tongue starts swelling up, then emergency care
is needed right away, said Dr. Gerald Natzke, a Flint Township environmental
medicine specialist.

If the sting causes pain, itching or some swelling, it is
suggested to use Calamine lotion or take Benadryl.

Baking soda mixed with water is an old trick to help with
the itch from a bee sting. One trick some may not know is you can make a
similar paste with meat tenderizer and water, Natzke said.

“Bee venom is a protein. It can be denatured by using the
meat tenderizers,” he said.

Poison Ivy

poison ivy
Get ready for spring with tips and advice on sunburns, bee stings, poison ivy, allergies

Living in Michigan,
knowing what poison ivy looks like is important, Soderstrom said.

“Poison ivy is an epidemic in Michigan. It is everywhere. It
starts out this type of year as a low-growing weed and then begins vining up in
the summertime,” he said.

Eastern poison ivy is typically a hairy, ropelike vine with
three shiny green (or red in the fall) leaves budding from one small stem,
according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Western
poison ivy is typically a low shrub with three leaves that does not form a
climbing vine. It may have yellow or green flowers and white to green-yellow or
amber berries.

Soderstrom said it’s known for its three leaves.

Poison ivy, however, is not just found in the woods, he
said. People can come in contact with it while gardening, in a park, off in the
weeds or climbing up a tree or house, he said.

While some people will be unaffected when coming into
contact with poison ivy, others will be greatly affected after only a short
exposure to it, Soderstrom said.

A poison ivy reaction often shows as a rash or blisters in a
straight line and it takes about 24 to 48 hours to really break out. The rash
will get worse within the first few days before it gets better, and it can take
about two or three weeks to completely clear up, he said.

Over-the-counter medication, like Calamine lotion, will help
with the itching, but if it blisters, people need prescription medicine,
Soderstrom said.

Poison ivy contact really starts picking up in the
middle of May and grows rather dramatically in the summer. If people know they
are going to be in weeded areas or the woods, they should wear long sleeves
and pants, he said.

Once someone realizes they’ve been in contact with poison
ivy, they should shower and soap up within 30 minutes, Soderstrom said. Poison
ivy cannot be spread from one person to another, but it can be spread off the clothing
the person was wearing if they are not washed right after contact.

Allergies

Believe it or not, allergy season has already began, said
Natzke.

Get ready for spring with tips and advice on sunburns, bee stings, poison ivy, allergies

Trees are releasing pollen and have been for
a while, he said. Grass allergies won’t be far away, along with mold allergies.

“We have a lot of trees in this area, so it’s real common to
have tree-sensitive individuals,” Natzke said. “It’s going to come out full
force here in the next few weeks.”

Shortness of breath, coughing, watery and itchy eyes and
runny nose are all signs of allergies. If allergies to pollen or grass are not
an issue, spring is a great time to open the windows and air out the house to
let chemicals out and fresh air in, Natzke said.

If allergies are a problem, opening the windows might make
it worse, so Natzke suggested getting an air purifier.

With spring just beginning, it might be a good time to talk
with a physician about the best ways to control allergies, he said.

Medications are good for people who have mild to moderate
allergies for a short period of time, Natzke said. There is nasal spray
available to get some of the pollen and mold out of the nose.

“Allergies are getting worse and getting more prevalent,”
Natzke said, noting that decreased immune systems have a lot to do with it. “Put
yourself in a healthier place, by reducing stressers and improving their sleep
habits, exercise and reducing exposure to toxins.”

Exposure to chemicals from things such as potent household
cleaners, pesticides and smoke and wood burning stoves increase the potential
for the development allergies. As the warmer
weather encourages spring cleaning and painting, Natzke advised people to be
cautious of the products they use.

Rabies

Although it’s not common in the area, springtime is a good
time to be aware of the disease.

Rabies is a viral disease that is usually transmitted from animal
to animal, but can also infect humans as a result of an animal bite, according
to the Genesee County Health Department’s website.

People are out
and about and playing, they could come certainly in contact with certain type
of animals and animals that may appear wild or have abnormal behavior and can
be bitten,” said Dr. Gary Johnson, Genesee County Health Department medical
director. “Just be on the lookout for any type of animal that looks (and acts)
strangely.”

Animals most affected by rabies are wild animals such as
skunks, raccoons, foxes and bats. Domestic animals – usually unvaccinated cats
and dogs – can also spread the virus, according to the website.

Johnson said people should not try to capture a wild animal
they think is affected with rabies. If bitten by a wild animal, the individual
should call their primary health care provider or visit an emergency room.

For more information about rabies and what to do if bitten,
visit the Genesee County Health Department’s website.

Get ready for spring with tips and advice on sunburns, bee stings, poison ivy, allergies

Get ready for spring with tips and advice on sunburns, bee stings, poison ivy, allergies
Get ready for spring with tips and advice on sunburns, bee stings, poison ivy, allergies
Get ready for spring with tips and advice on sunburns, bee stings, poison ivy, allergies

Climate change means mutant poison ivy

Climate change means mutant poison ivy

Climate change means mutant poison ivy – Back in college, I developed an oozing poison ivy rash all over my neck and arms and had to go on steroids — just because I inadvertently grazed the clothes of a friend who had gone tromping through the woods earlier that day. What’s worse, it happened right before the Dalai Lama visited my school. While my classmates were leaning forward in their folding chairs to capture his every syllable, I was shifting in my seat, clutching a bottle of calamine lotion, and desperately trying to look calm while the Lama talked about peace of mind — something I only know from reading the transcript. It’s hard to listen while your skin is on fire.

poison ivy climate change

So yeah, I’m pretty allergic to poison ivy. But a lot of people are — 80 percent of the population reacts to the vine with welts and maddeningly itchy rashes. So the fact that poison ivy plants are getting bigger and more poisonous due to climate change isn’t exactly welcome news. But that’s precisely what’s happening; scientific research indicates that with higher levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, the poison ivy plant grows larger, and its “oil” (a.k.a. the awful poisonous stuff) becomes more potent.

Fortunately, someone’s already thinking about how we could do a better job getting rid of the plant. (Rabbits and deer might miss it — they’re immune to the ivy’s poison, so it makes a nice leafy lunch for them — but consequences to the overall ecosystem would be minor, experts say.) Last week a group of horticulturists, scientists, and nurses convened in Philadelphia for the first conference devoted exclusively to the nettlesome vine. Ivy eradication specialist Umar Mycka, who also works at the Philadelphia zoo, organized the small, four-day gathering. One of his goals was to swap itching remedies and removal strategies with other poison ivy experts.

poison ivy

“If you want to deal with a problem, you have to know what size problem you’re dealing with,” Mycka says. “These plants are so powerful to start with, it doesn’t take much of a touch from carbon to make it much worse.”

That’s exactly what scientists found when they planted poison ivy in an experimental forest at Duke University, piping in carbon dioxide to artificially raise the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere to the levels it’s expected to be by about 2050. The result, published in 2006: like other plants subjected to a high-CO2 environment, the poison ivy plants grew 150 percent bigger, with 153 percent higher concentrations of their oil, called urushiol.

Lewis Ziska, a plant physiologist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture who co-authored the study, estimates that poison ivy plants are already growing 50 to 60 percent larger than they did 100 years ago. He told me that warmer temperatures are probably also pushing poison ivy-growing zones northward (again, as with many other plants), and urbanization is creating conditions amenable to the wily plant, which thrives in semi-developed areas with more sunlight.

“Think of heat islands or cities as climate change in miniature,” Ziska says. “There are higher C02 concentrations, higher temperatures. There’s a fragmentation of ecosystems. All of those factors allow poison ivy to enter an environment that it may not have been in before.”

At the Philadelphia conference, attendees had a chance to see poison ivy’s monstrous proportions firsthand. Mycka led them to a public park near the center of the city, where a large vine had been growing up a tree. Its weight after removal: 506 pounds. And climate change is going to make it worse? I can already feel my skin burning.

poison ivy

poison ivy

Climate change means mutant poison ivy

Climate change means mutant poison ivy

You don’t want to itch for spring – poison ivy is lurking

You don’t want to itch for spring – poison ivy is lurking

With spring will come green plants, some of which give humans contact dermatitis or irritated skin.

There are three main offenders to watch for locally: western poison ivy, nettles and wild parsnip, said Randy Schindle, private land specialist with the Department of Natural Resources.

All three irritate in different ways, he added.

“Poison ivy has a chemical in it; more an allergic reaction,” Schindle said.

It gives a person water blisters and severe itching, but there’s a simple cure.

“Soap and water takes care of it,” Schindle said. “Get to soap as quick as you can.”

Touching poison ivy isn’t the only danger. If you’re trying to get rid of it with fire, watch out.

“Breathe it in when it’s burning and you’ll get a reaction in the lungs,” Schindle said. “Not a good thing.”

poison ivy
You don’t want to itch for spring – poison ivy is lurking

Poison ivy is a low vine with three leaves that are usually glossy and turn red in the fall. The berries are white/light green and are eaten by birds. Other than feeding the birds, Schindle didn’t know of any other purpose it serves, but said it was a native plant.

Nettles are also native. Look for a wood stem covered with leaves that have serrated edges, and “a greenish-white spike of flowers on top,” Schindle said.

“It gets pretty tall,” he added. “I’ve seen it over six feet.”

Both kinds of nettles – stinging nettle and wood nettle – have “little hairs” that inject histamine and other chemicals, he said.

“It just burns more than anything,” Schindle said of the reaction. It doesn’t cause water blisters, but the skin might get red.

Ironically, it doesn’t burn indiscriminately.

“It only burns where you don’t have fingerprints,” Schindle said. “You can actually touch it with the pads of your fingers, but [if you touch it] with the backs of your fingers, it’ll burn you.”

poison ivy
You don’t want to itch for spring – poison ivy is lurking

The chemicals don’t stand up to boiling water.

“Drop it in boiling water and you have instant spinach,” Schindle said. “I’ve eaten them and they’re quite good.”

Schindle said nettles might be found in health food stores, but he wasn’t sure what it is used for.

Although nettles might made a good substitute for your salad, you don’t want to mistake wild parsnip – and Schindle said it’s easy to do.

“Wild parsnip is in the dill or carrot family,” he said. It’s a wild form of domestic parsnip and looks similar to dill or Golden Alexander, which are beneficial, while wild parsnip is dangerous.

“It will cause very severe blistering and burning,” Schindle said.

Make sure you take note of where wild parsnip grows, because whether you react to it or not depends on when you encounter it.

“Wild parsnip has a photo-chemical reaction that reacts with sunshine,” Schindle said. “If you’re out in the dark, you’re fine.”

Wild parsnip can be a big plant, growing to 6 feet, he said. It has bigger seed than its look-a-likes, and the leaves are different.

Unlike poison ivy and nettles, wild parsnip is not native.

poison ivy
You don’t want to itch for spring – poison ivy is lurking

“It’s a very invasive plant,” Schindle warned.

People can help keep it from spreading by being careful when they mow, particularly road ditches.

“It’s biennial, like carrots,” Schindle said.

Biennials die after two years. The first year, wild parsnip will just get leaves. The second year, it will bloom, go to seed and die. When they are mowed while in seed, it spreads the seeds and allows the plants to proliferate.

It’s best to get rid of it before it goes to seed, Schindle said.

“Mow them just when they’re starting to bloom,” he said.

Another way to get rid of all three is herbicide, but check the labels or ask the advice of a plant expert. Schindle said nettles can be pulled by hand, but you must wear gloves.

“Just be sure of your ID before you decide to control them,” Schindle warned. “You might be controlling a beneficial plant.”

poison ivy

You don’t want to itch for spring – poison ivy is lurking | You don’t want to itch for spring – poison ivy is lurking
You don’t want to itch for spring – poison ivy is lurking | You don’t want to itch for spring – poison ivy is lurking

You don’t want to itch for spring – poison ivy is lurking

You don’t want to itch for spring – poison ivy is lurking

Poison Ivy Pictures

Poison Ivy Pictures – This page has been developed to share a variety of pictures related to poison ivy. As can be seen below, the first set of pictures related to poison ivy in the wild. These pictures are beneficial to study, in order to become aware of exactly what it looks like, so that you can avoid it. Not everybody was a boy or girl scout and not everybody realizes the may have it growing in their own yard or neighborhood where they spend time. The second set of photographs presents pictures of poison ivy rash. Let me warn you, some of these pictures are not pretty, but are necessary to educate the masses of what exposure to the nasty plant can actually do to some people. Again, the pictures are not presented here to scare you or gross you out, but are here to educate you, your friends and family. However, that can only happen if you share the information, so please take the time and utilize the social friendly sharing buttons at the beginning and/or end of the post. We really do appreciate it!

Poison Ivy Pictures

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I think you get the idea. As can be seen in the above photographs, “Leaves of three? Let them be!”, as these plants have a cluster of three leaves at the end of a long stem. Other identifying indicators of leaves include:

The leaves alternate, with three leaflets sitting on a long stem.

The leaflets are broad and the two side leaflets are smaller than the the end or middle leaf.

The center leaf usually has a small stem, wheres the two side leaves grow directly from the vine and typically do not have small stems.

The leaves tend to be a bright to dark, and a waxy green when viewed from above. When viewed from underneath, they appear lighter and hairier/fuzzier. In the spring time, the leaves are usually a bright green, while during the fall, they tend to turn red (poison ivy), bright red or orange (poison oak).

Keep in mind that while these leaves usually appear shiny, they won’t always. In particular, do not rely on shininess as an indicator after it has recently rained.

Now that you have savvy enough to identify what poison ivy is, perhaps you should educate yourself on what a poison ivy rash looks like, just in case you or someone you know catches it. The following pictures depict what a poison ivy rash can look like, from mild cases to severe.

poison ivy picturespoison ivy picturespoison ivy picturespoison ivy picturespoison ivy picturespoison ivy picturespoison ivy picturespoison ivy picturespoison ivy picturespoison ivy picturespoison ivy picturespoison ivy picturespoison ivy picturespoison ivy picturespoison ivy pictures

Poison Ivy Pictures

Poison Ivy Pictures

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