_ap_ufes{"success":true,"siteUrl":"howtotreatpoisonivy.com","urls":{"Home":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com","Category":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/category/poison-ivy-news/","Archive":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/2015/04/","Post":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/go-ahead-little-goat-eat-some-poison-ivy-it-wont-hurt-a-bit/","Page":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/5-myths-treating-poison-ivy-rashes/","Nav_menu_item":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/96/"}}_ap_ufee

July 20, 2018

Comcast Borrows Apple's Branding Flourishes for Its Remotes


Print 13 comment(s) – last by theapparition.. on Feb 24 at 3:56 PM


It’s unclear whether the embellishment was meant to be ironic

Comcast Corp.’s (CMCSA) Xfinity service generally leaves something to be desired although in some regions it’s better than others. But it’s not Comcast’s service, customer relations etiquette, or pending merger with Time Warner Cable Inc. (TWC) that are the topic du jour. Rather it’s a rather humorous bit of self-promotion offered up by Comcast’s set-top box remotes team, which apparently is based out of Philadelphia, Penn.

Users have been noting that new XR5 v4u remotes for Xfinity boxes carry the bold proclamation:


Designed by Comcast in Philadelphia

Comcast XR5

Sound familiar? It’s the same wording (and virtually the same font/lettering style, as well) that’s used by Apple, Inc. (AAPL) on its products:

Apple designed by

Here’s another view of the flourish, thanks to a user on Twitter, Inc. (TWTR):

Is Comcast being intentionally humorous? Or do their designers just have delusions of grandeur in placing such silly embellishment on a cheap plastic utility product?

Either way, this is pretty funny. And about the only thing that could make it funnier is if Apple sued Comcast for cribbing its trademarked look. Now that would be real entertaintment.

Sources: Twitter, Gizmodo

“I mean, if you wanna break down someone’s door, why don’t you start with AT&T, for God sakes? They make your amazing phone unusable as a phone!” — Jon Stewart on Apple and the iPhone

Credit: 

Comcast Borrows Apple's Branding Flourishes for Its Remotes

'A poison ivy crisis,' and he's the crisis manager

Plants are waking up and seedlings emerging. Runners are creeping across yards and woodlands, over fences and walls. Ropelike aerial roots are shooting up the sides of trees like archers to a target.

Got itch yet?

Poison ivy got its name in the 1600s from Capt. John Smith, the explorer, who noted its resemblance to English ivy. Connecticut is the nation’s poison ivy epicenter, Mycka says, “but the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware region is not far off.”

It’s spread by birds, which eat the seeds. Development and habitat destruction, and our own gardening habits, are factors, too, Mycka says. We build homes and attract birds that like to eat from feeders, explore our gardens, and perch on our decks, buildings, and fences.

Duke University researchers have also determined that rising carbon dioxide levels are causing poison ivy to grow faster and produce more potent urushiol, the pale, resin-like substance that causes the plant’s signature rash, swelling, and blistering.

“We have a poison ivy crisis now,” Mycka says. “People can’t identify it and remove it. They’re so disconnected from nature.”

That was not the case with Gusoff, a retired public schoolteacher who loves to garden and tried for two years, unsuccessfully, to get rid of her poison ivy.

Gusoff, who suffers from multiple sclerosis and other ailments and walks with a cane, became so overwhelmed by “the monster” quietly infiltrating her yard that she avoided the family’s aboveground pool for two summers.

And got zapped anyway.

In August, she broke out in a bodysuit-like rash after snuggling with Delilah Mercedes, her senior-citizen golden retriever now nicknamed “the culprit.”

“She enjoys exploring the backyard. It’s a jungle out there,” says Gusoff, who finally called Mycka.

One day in late April, he arrives with a crew of three. They’re wearing long sleeves, long pants, double gloves, and wrist-to-elbow Tyvek protectors, knee pads, and boots.

(We resist the temptation to chant: Leaves of three, let it be! Hairy rope, don’t be a dope!)

Using Japanese gardening knives and serrated grass sickles with hardened steel blades, the men follow the vines 15 feet down the trunk to the base of a 30-year-old white spruce, and out into the yard.

“It doesn’t matter if you start above or on the ground, as long as you get it all,” says Mycka, who estimates that Gusoff’s vine is nine years old, 19 feet long, and 25 pounds.

A mere mini.

In 2013, Mycka used crowbars to pry a 50-foot poison ivy vine off a hackberry tree along Kelly Drive in Fairmount Park. Counting rings, he determined that the female vine – yes, there are male and female plants – was 38 years old. Cut into five pieces, it tipped the scales at 506 pounds.

“This is an interesting job,” says Mycka, who collects poison ivy books and art in his Overbrook home.

He grew up in the city’s Somerton section, always wanted to be a gardener, and became fascinated by toxic plants when he was a Boy Scout.

He signed on at the zoo in 1974 and, after seven years of evening classes, earned a two-year associate’s degree in horticulture from Temple University Ambler.

You’d think “the poison ivy horticulturist” would be happy that it’s such a problem. Actually, says Mycka, who hosted a poison ivy conference in Philadelphia in 2012 and 2013, “I want to educate people. There’s so much suffering. I really don’t want to have 20 crews out pulling poison ivy.”

Poisonous in every season, poison ivy doesn’t die in winter. Bird-dropped seeds can germinate and wind up climbing a tree 15 feet away. In three years, that vine can be 25 feet up the trunk. In 40 years, just imagine.

If you’re lucky, you’re among the 15 percent of the population whose immune systems don’t register poison ivy as a threat. Mycka’s crew is among them, but he is not.

Yes, the boss occasionally gets the rash. But, as you might imagine, he is very, very careful.

So careful that when a now poison-ivy-free Gusoff approaches to shake his hand, Mycka backs off. “We’ll do a virtual handshake,” he says.

“God bless you,” his grateful client responds from two feet away.

vsmith@phillynews.com

215-854-5720215-854-5720

facebook.com/InqGardening

@inkygardener

www.inquirer.com/kisstheearth.

Learn more

More here: 

'A poison ivy crisis,' and he's the crisis manager

Archaeology, historic preservation company CHRS Inc. exhumes pieces of the past


View and purchase photos

A motorist slows down when he notices the archaeologists from Cultural Heritage Resource Services Inc. in Lansdale have returned to their Delaware County dig site.

Recently snow and extreme cold have delayed this third and final phase of the stratified layer excavation. But today temperatures will reach the 30s, and warm sunlight is shining just right in the area of the Marcus Hook SEPTA train station.

“Find any gold yet?” the passing motorist asks.

Archaeologist Rachael Fowler explains that there is a historical society in town, and its headquarters, The Plank House, was frequented by the infamous pirate Blackbeard because his mistress lived there.

When he was in these parts centuries ago, Blackbeard’s agenda was not likely to involve hiding pirate plunder, Fowler opined.

The approximately one-acre area of the dig, marked off with orange mesh plastic fencing, puts them right on top of people’s back yards.

“We try to be as unobtrusive as possible,” she said of the high-traffic residential area.

The circa 1927 bridge that crosses over the train station is due for replacement. CHRS Director of Archaeology Tom Lewis said that per state law, just as an engineering or environmental survey is required before construction begins, projects of this nature require an excavation for artifacts of historical or cultural significance. Although this seemingly guarantees work for archaeological firms like CHRS, Lewis pointed out that state budget cuts can take that work away.

According to Fowler, most people think the crew of seven CHRS archaeologists are looking for dinosaur bones or buried treasure. In this case, the buried treasure they’re unearthing is artifacts such as antique glass bottles, children’s toys and dish fragments that came from three late 19th century to early 20th century homes that exist only on historical maps and deed records. What they find will be taken back to the CHRS offices on Cannon Avenue, carefully washed off, labeled and cataloged. CHRS has promised a detailed report, likely to be written by Fowler, to both PennDOT and the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.

Lewis, who has worked for CHRS 29 years, noted that Marcus Hook had one of the first successful African-American communities in the USA, and wondered if these homes might have some link to that history. Continued…

So far, the best proof that there were houses here are the brick-lined privy shafts that have been uncovered. Since the homes that once stood here were built before organized trash removal, “they had to fill it out with refuse after taking the nasty stuff out,” Fowler said, referring to the shafts’ original use as outhouse pits.

“We’ll be able to tell what they threw away. We’ll find bones with butcher marks,” she said.

“The Philadelphia area was pretty into shellfish at the turn of the century,” Lewis said when asked about clam shells that may have been buried for 100 years.

Cultural heritage preservation is something that Mike Rowe has likely tried on the TV show “Dirty Jobs.”

“You’re going to get pretty gross,” Fowler says, noticing that this writer has worn work boots and cold weather outerwear, but not ski pants or insulated pants.

“I’ve been out in days with -18 wind chill. There will be ticks (in warmer conditions). There will be poison ivy. Still, it’s better than my best day at a desk job,” Fowler said.

Despite the cold, and the sloppy, muddy ground, the dig site is abuzz with activity. Discolorations in the soil have been found, suggesting more filled-in holes. Clumps of dirt are being set aside to be shaken through a screen; some will have to wait until they thaw. Archaeologist Adam Richardson has pulled some glass medicine bottles from the ground. That the bottles are unbroken is a lucky find. Lewis is examining the site from multiple angles through the lens of a surveyor’s camera. Per procedure, the entire dig site has to be mapped and graphed, showing grid-by-grid what was found where, and how far down.

Specific areas of the site are referred to as test units, which represent a cubic meter and roughly a ton of dirt. Two people are assigned to each test unit.

The sample of the archaeologist’s tools of the trade include shovels; root clippers; screens; trowels; split spoon samplers, which take a 20-cm. core sample that shows if there are changes in the soil; and an array of measuring tools, including a submeter GPS.

The dig, which began in September, will — he hopes — be wrapped up by April, Lewis said. Continued…

To learn more about CHRS, visit

www.chrsinc.com

.

A motorist slows down when he notices the archaeologists from Cultural Heritage Resource Services Inc. in Lansdale have returned to their Delaware County dig site.

Recently snow and extreme cold have delayed this third and final phase of the stratified layer excavation. But today temperatures will reach the 30s, and warm sunlight is shining just right in the area of the Marcus Hook SEPTA train station.

“Find any gold yet?” the passing motorist asks.

Archaeologist Rachael Fowler explains that there is a historical society in town, and its headquarters, The Plank House, was frequented by the infamous pirate Blackbeard because his mistress lived there.

When he was in these parts centuries ago, Blackbeard’s agenda was not likely to involve hiding pirate plunder, Fowler opined.

The approximately one-acre area of the dig, marked off with orange mesh plastic fencing, puts them right on top of people’s back yards.

“We try to be as unobtrusive as possible,” she said of the high-traffic residential area.

The circa 1927 bridge that crosses over the train station is due for replacement. CHRS Director of Archaeology Tom Lewis said that per state law, just as an engineering or environmental survey is required before construction begins, projects of this nature require an excavation for artifacts of historical or cultural significance. Although this seemingly guarantees work for archaeological firms like CHRS, Lewis pointed out that state budget cuts can take that work away.

According to Fowler, most people think the crew of seven CHRS archaeologists are looking for dinosaur bones or buried treasure. In this case, the buried treasure they’re unearthing is artifacts such as antique glass bottles, children’s toys and dish fragments that came from three late 19th century to early 20th century homes that exist only on historical maps and deed records. What they find will be taken back to the CHRS offices on Cannon Avenue, carefully washed off, labeled and cataloged. CHRS has promised a detailed report, likely to be written by Fowler, to both PennDOT and the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.

Lewis, who has worked for CHRS 29 years, noted that Marcus Hook had one of the first successful African-American communities in the USA, and wondered if these homes might have some link to that history.

So far, the best proof that there were houses here are the brick-lined privy shafts that have been uncovered. Since the homes that once stood here were built before organized trash removal, “they had to fill it out with refuse after taking the nasty stuff out,” Fowler said, referring to the shafts’ original use as outhouse pits.

“We’ll be able to tell what they threw away. We’ll find bones with butcher marks,” she said.

“The Philadelphia area was pretty into shellfish at the turn of the century,” Lewis said when asked about clam shells that may have been buried for 100 years.

Cultural heritage preservation is something that Mike Rowe has likely tried on the TV show “Dirty Jobs.”

“You’re going to get pretty gross,” Fowler says, noticing that this writer has worn work boots and cold weather outerwear, but not ski pants or insulated pants.

“I’ve been out in days with -18 wind chill. There will be ticks (in warmer conditions). There will be poison ivy. Still, it’s better than my best day at a desk job,” Fowler said.

Despite the cold, and the sloppy, muddy ground, the dig site is abuzz with activity. Discolorations in the soil have been found, suggesting more filled-in holes. Clumps of dirt are being set aside to be shaken through a screen; some will have to wait until they thaw. Archaeologist Adam Richardson has pulled some glass medicine bottles from the ground. That the bottles are unbroken is a lucky find. Lewis is examining the site from multiple angles through the lens of a surveyor’s camera. Per procedure, the entire dig site has to be mapped and graphed, showing grid-by-grid what was found where, and how far down.

Specific areas of the site are referred to as test units, which represent a cubic meter and roughly a ton of dirt. Two people are assigned to each test unit.

The sample of the archaeologist’s tools of the trade include shovels; root clippers; screens; trowels; split spoon samplers, which take a 20-cm. core sample that shows if there are changes in the soil; and an array of measuring tools, including a submeter GPS.

The dig, which began in September, will — he hopes — be wrapped up by April, Lewis said.

To learn more about CHRS, visit www.chrsinc.com.

Source: 

Archaeology, historic preservation company CHRS Inc. exhumes pieces of the past

Wordpress SEO Plugin by SEOPressor