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August 19, 2018

PureLife Organic in Cotton Exchange expanding distribution

Victoria Chavez, owner of PureLife Organic, displays PureLife products in her shop located at the Cotton Exchange in Wilmington. Chavez uses recipes passed down from her grandmother to make herbal remedies and has started selling to stores around the country.

Buy PhotoPhoto by Mike Spencer

Published: Saturday, December 27, 2014 at 8:30 a.m.
Last Modified: Friday, December 26, 2014 at 8:33 p.m.

When Victoria Chavez fell ill as a child, a visit to her grandmother’s house trumped sitting in a waiting room.

“Every time I got sick, she used to pull out this little box of herbs or literally go to her backyard and start picking out the herbs and plants,” Chavez said.

Herbalism – using natural products for medicinal purposes – would years later become the basis for PureLife Organic, Chavez’s store at 317 N. Front St. in the Cotton Exchange. While Wilmingtonians have been trying out her skin care products and herbal tinctures for years, customers up and down the East Coast are beginning to see the PureLife label on the shelves of their local health food stores.

In 2013, Chavez began wholesaling some of her products, handmade in Wilmington since she opened shop in 2007. Products in her Miracle Skin Relief line of balms, soap, shampoo and ointment ship out to stores in Maryland, Virginia, Florida and elsewhere, as do a variety of her tinctures.

Chavez stresses that the tinctures are not traditional medicine or FDA-reviewed. Some are based on her grandmother’s recipes or of Chavez’s own creation. Her migraine tonic contains feverfew and peppermint, while “Tummy Bitters” is made with chamomile and ginger, among other plants.

“I tell (customers), ‘I’m not your doctor,’?” she said. “I’m here to make you feel more comfortable. … I’m not here to cure, treat or diagnose a problem, and if you keep on being sick, you need to see a doctor.”

Wholesale broker Megan Schlicht said in the year and half she’s worked with Chavez, they’ve gotten PureLife products into nearly 10 shops, such as Salud Healthy Pantry in the wealthy Fairfax County, Va., community. Chavez said another broker sells to Florida stores with plans to expand to Georgia.

“Our independents around here, they like to support small businesses like themselves, and especially support local,” said Schlicht, who operates out of Baltimore and West Virginia. “You set up appointments and go in and present the product. We have to kind of look at their shelf space and what else they’re selling. … Luckily her product is something that’s more widely accepted everywhere because everybody’s going to get bug bites or poison ivy or scratches.” Schlicht said in the coming year she’ll be negotiating to get PureLife goods into East Coast chain stores, such as MOM’s Organic Market with locations in Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Washington, D.C.

For Chavez, getting calls from customers states away can be surreal. Most of her products were designed with Wilmington in mind – she created “Brain Formula” after a customer who attended Cape Fear Community College asked for an alternative to chugging Red Bulls to stay focused.

“It’s just weird because I’m used to seeing everybody face to face, knowing them, talking to them,” she said. “But it’s nice to see that the stores that carry my product – they believe in my product just as much as I do.”

Cammie Bellamy: 910-343-2339

On Twitter: @cammiebellamy

From: 

PureLife Organic in Cotton Exchange expanding distribution

Leaves of three, let it be

Leaves of three, let it be

Time to call Poison Ivy Gone

Published Aug 28, 2014 at 9:35 pm
(Updated Aug 28, 2014)

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Photos

  • Poison Ivy

  • Poison Ivy Gone workers dig up the plants and remove them.

  • The van says it all.

Things you may not know about poison ivy – but should
Urushiol (u-ROO-she-ol), the culprit in poison ivy, is found in leaves, stems and roots of the plant.
Three out of four people who come in contact with urushiol will develop a rash, an allergic dermatitis.
The first contact with urushiol often does not cause a reaction. However, the immune system goes on the defense and the next contact will result in an allergic reaction.
Skin must come in direct contact with the oil to be affected but it can be spread by contaminated hands, clothing, tools, sporting equipment, etc. The contamination can last for five years. The blister fluid does not spread the rash.
Symptoms, 12-48 hours after exposure: redness, itching, swelling, streaky or patchy rash, red bumps, blisters, sometimes oozing. Typically lasts 5-12 days, 30 days or longer in severe cases.
Medical attention is needed if there is a rash on face, lips, eyes or genitals, severe swelling, difficulty in breathing or a widespread reaction.
Never burn poison ivy. While the oil cannot be inhaled from the plant, burning results in toxic smoke that can cause a serious reaction in the lungs, nasal passages and throat.
Urushiol oil remains in the stems of poison ivy for years after the plant dies.
To prevent infection after contact, shower in cool water as soon as possible. Wash toys and tools in soap and cold water.

BY GINNY RAUE
You went to sleep fine last night but woke up this morning with blisters and itching skin. Sure, you were weeding yesterday but you had on your garden gloves. So how did you get poison ivy?

According to George Louvis, the marketing director for Poison Ivy Gone, your cloth gloves act like a sponge, absorbing the urushiol oil in poison ivy, increasing the amount of oil that comes in contact with your skin and making your allergic reaction even worse.

Poison Ivy Gone
Oakland, New Jersey
Free estimates available
973-790-3638
http://www.poisonivygone.com
Business hours: Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Closed Sat. and Sun.

Based in Oakland, Poison Ivy Gone has over 28 years of experience in professionally removing poison ivy in Northern New Jersey but they have also worked in Orange and Rockland counties, Pennsylvania and South Jersey. They service residential and commercial properties as well as others sites, such as country clubs, playgrounds and schools. They are Service Award winners on Angie’s List.

“She comes on like a rose, but everybody knows, she’ll get you in Dutch….”

Louvis reports that poison ivy starts to grow in the spring and he said this year’s weather conditions created the perfect storm.

“It’s a weed, so there’s not much that stops its growth. It’s a vicious and invasive plant and it doesn’t take a lot for it to take over,” he said.

Poison ivy can grow anywhere but usually pops up around the borders of your property or near the house. It roots well in mulch, flower beds and woods, where there is little activity, and tends to shoot off in many directions.

“It’s very aggressive and it spreads in two ways; along the ground, where it gets longer and bigger and then every so often it shoots vertical. That’s when it reproduces and drops seeds. When it starts climbing it’s getting ready to have babies,” he said.

Your dog can take a walk on the wild side in poison ivy and suffer no ill effects, but once you pet your furry friend, who carries the oil on his coat, you’re in trouble. Backyard birds are also culprits in the itchy world of poison ivy. They ingest the berries of the plant and as they do a fly-over they pass the seeds, perfectly encased in their own little sack of fertilizer. No harm intended, but now you are in deep doo-doo and have a good chance of becoming a host property for poison ivy.

“You can look but you’d better not touch….”

Attempting to eliminate poison ivy with a lawn mower or weed whacker only succeeds in spreading the oil on the grass, in the bushes, on your shoes and pant legs. Your tools are also contaminated for the next five years unless they are properly cleaned. And it gets worse.

“When your kids play in the yard the oil is all over the lawn,” Louvis said.

“She’s pretty as a daisy, but look out man, she’s crazy….”

Poison ivy is easiest to identify from April to October. It goes dormant after the fall, but doesn’t die and you can still get a rash in the dead of winter. While the leaves remain is the best time to call Poison Ivy Gone.

“It’s never a do-it-yourself job. Our guys recognize it, figure out where it’s coming from, remove it completely and show you how to keep it from coming back,” Louvis said.

Poison Ivy Gone’s preferred method is to remove it by hand, just beneath ground level, or in the case of significant infestation, by machine.

Sometimes customers prefer the use of an herbicide to protect certain plants from harm. In that case, Poison Ivy Gone technicians use a paint brush to apply the herbicide to the poison ivy leaves, killing off the noxious plant only.

“They are skilled and careful and we are licensed to use herbicides,” Louvis said.

“You’re gonna need an ocean of calamine lotion….”

Poison Ivy Gone technicians know how to protect themselves so they’re not scratching like a hound the minute they mess around with poison ivy.

“The guys are basically in haz-mat suits. They take an oral product and use a cream on their skin. The suits are destroyed afterwards; you can’t re-use anything in this business,” Louvis said.

Poison Ivy Gone removes the poison ivy from the ground then carts it away from your property to a secure location.

And then the Poison Ivy is Gone.

Sources: http://lyricksfreak.com – “Poison Ivy” by the Coasters, 1959; http://www.mayoclinic.org; http://my.clevelandclinic.org;

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Leaves of three, let it be

Wild Moments: How to spot poison ivy

There’s a monster in the woods this time of year. It’s big, green and hairy – and it’s waiting patiently for you: Poison Ivy.

VIDEO: How to spot poison ivy

PHOTOS: Scenes from Shenk’s Ferry Wildflower Preserve 

LEARN MORE: Things you never knew about Pa.’s native plants

Tim Draude of the Muhlenberg Botanical Society is one of those rare individuals who is not allergic to poison ivy. He also has some tips on how to spot the plant before you come in contact with it.

Tips on how to spot poison ivy:

– Look for 3 shiny leaves

– Poison ivy has tiny greenish-white flowers

– Later in the season, white berries sprout from the plant

Although it’s a vine, the plant doesn’t necessarily climb trees. You can get poison ivy from the leaves, stems, or roots. Also, you don’t have to come in direct contact with the plant to get poison ivy. Pets that run through a patch of poison ivy can also bring it into your home.

Photos: Scenes from Shenk’s Ferry Wildflower Preserve





1 of 31

Meg Frankowski/WGAL

Shenk’s Ferry Wildflower Preserve, located along the Susquehanna River, is one of the region’s premier locations to observe native Pennsylvania plant life.

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Wild Moments: How to spot poison ivy

Report: Mosquitoes, poison ivy to grow with climate change

Report: Mosquitoes, poison ivy to grow with climate change

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August 22, 2014 12:00 AM

There’s bad news for nature lovers this week: The most annoying outdoor bugs and pests will only get peskier and more prevalent with climate change.

Tiger mosquitoes, poison ivy, deer ticks and fire ants will all be conquering new ground and expanding their range as temperatures rise with global warming, according to a report released this week from the National Wildlife Federation called “Ticked off: America’s outdoor experience and climate change.”

On SouthCoast the pest that is most concerning is the tiger mosquito, said Dr. Doug Inkley, who authored the report.

Tiger mosquitoes can carry 30 different types of diseases, including West Nile Virus, EEE and Dengue fever, among others. Unlike many species of mosquitoes which are mostly active at dusk and dawn, tiger mosquitoes are active all day long, posing a particular threat to humans.

Currently, tiger mosquitoes, an invasive species from Asia, are present in southeastern Pennsylvania and the “very coastal areas” of Connecticut and Rhode Island.

By 2020, that will change thanks to global warming, Inkley said. By 2020 tiger mosquitoes could be present in all of coastal Massachusetts as rising temperatures encourage them to come north.

“Basically this host species, which carries diseases, is going to be out there all day, greatly increasing the exposure risk to humans,” Inkley said.

Just because a warmer climate will be favorable to tiger mosquitoes does not mean it will be favorable for all 30 of the diseases they can carry.

Still, Inkley said there is a cause for concern.

Another pest that will impact SouthCoast is poison ivy. Like all plants, poison ivy thrives when there is more carbon dioxide, a symptom of global warming. Poison ivy can also thrive in a warmer environment, meaning the plant will become more prevalent.

Perhaps more concerning, however, is that the combination of added heat and carbon dioxide will also increase the toxicity of urushiol, the part of poison ivy that causes allergic reactions in humans.

“This report shows that there are significant pests that we do deal with now but that we will have to take more effort to deal with in the future,” Inkley said.

He said he did not want the report to discourage people from spending time outdoors, noting that “the outdoor experience is so important to children and their health.”

But, he said, unless public policy changes so that the amount of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere decreases significantly, people will have to be much more vigilant when they are outside.

“We already know how to protect ourselves by wearing long clothing, and we should continue to do that,” he said. “But we also need to cut our carbon emissions and invest in renewable energy.”

Follow Ariel Wittenberg on Twitter at @awittenberg_SCT


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Original post: 

Report: Mosquitoes, poison ivy to grow with climate change

Climate change to boost health problems

Climate change: Now it’s personal.

There will be more itching, sneezing, swelling and gasping for breath as Pennsylvania’s climate shifts and residents are exposed to more poison ivy, stinging insects, pollen allergies and lyme-disease-bearing ticks, and experience increased asthma, respiratory disease and heat-related deaths.

That was the assessment of scientists and physicians at a one-day climate change conference sponsored by the Allegheny County Health Department and the University of Pittsburgh’s Graduate School of Public Health last week.

They said a silver lining is that Pennsylvanians won’t see the worst of those negative impacts until after 2050. But the bad news, echoing the findings contained in the third U.S. National Climate Assessment released May 6, is that the changes already have begun.

And, they agreed, the negative consequences of climate change brought on by man-made emissions of greenhouse gases will worsen the longer the world waits to reduce those emissions.

Raymond Najjar, a professor of oceanography in the Meteorology Department at Penn State University and an author of the 2009 Pennsylvania Climate Impact Assessment, said the most recent assessment released three weeks ago shows “some climate change is unavoidable,” and the state will get warmer and wetter. Heavy downpours will be more intense and more frequent.

He predicted that unless Pennsylvania cuts its emissions of greenhouse gases — including nitrogen oxides, carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide and volatile organic compounds — to 20 percent of what they are now, the state’s summer heat index will become 8 to 10 degrees warmer by the end of this century.

Without that level of emissions cuts, the number of days the temperature tops 90 degrees Fahrenheit each year will increase from 10 to 65 and Pennsylvania’s climate will resemble what is found now in northern Alabama.

“Pennsylvania has not done enough to reduce emissions and support renewable energy sources,” said Mr. Najjar, adding that even if emissions are reduced by 80 percent, Pennsylvania likely will see summer temperatures rise by 5 degrees Fahrenheit, giving it a climate resembling that of southern Kentucky today.

City and county officials must start now to adapt policies and programs to climate-altered and expanding public health needs, said Karen Hacker, Allegheny County Health Department director.

“Infectious diseases, ticks, mosquitoes will all increase as the climate warms, as will severity and incidence of asthma, water problems and severe weather,” Dr. Hacker said. “The increases will likely be incremental, but the impacts will collectively be bigger.”

Leonard Bielory, a professor at Rutgers University where he is studying the impact of a warming climate on allergies, said globally longer pollination seasons are expected to increase the duration of exposure and also the number of individuals who develop sensitivity to it.

“Ragweed is responding to climate change on a continental basis, so we’re seeing earlier and later pollen seasons and it moves northward with warmer climate,” he said. “By 2020, we expect to see pollen increase by 20 percent in Pennsylvania, and by 2050 sensitivity to allergens could double from what it is now.”

Dr. Bielory said research shows climate change is also likely to cause an increase in dust mites, stinging insects and cockroaches. The production of poison ivy oil, which causes the itchy skin rash, will increase as carbon dioxide levels rise, weed growth will be stimulated and peanut allergies, which have doubled in each of the last several decades, will continue to increase.

Lyme disease, the most prevalent vector-borne disease in the U.S. with 30,000 diagnosed and perhaps nine times more undiagnosed cases, also is likely to increase among humans as the geographic range of the tick that causes it continues to expand, according to Dustin Brisson, an associate professor of biology at the University of Pennsylvania, whose research involves evolutionary biology, molecular genetics and microbial ecology.

Peter Adams, a professor of civil and environmental engineering and engineering and public policy at Carnegie Mellon University, said warmer air temperatures combined with expected higher humidity “makes the atmosphere more able to do chemistry and produce compounds that could impact human health.”

One of those compounds likely to increase is ground-level ozone, the primary component of unhealthy smog. Methane emissions from increased shale gas drilling, along with nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compound emissions from drilling operations and increased truck traffic, also could rise.

“Depending on how tightly those [shale gas drilling] operations are controlled,” Mr. Adams said, “there could be significant health impacts on Pittsburgh and Philadelphia and even more significantly in the center of the state.”

Clifford Mitchell, director of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, said that mitigation policies are important and the public needs to get involved to force emissions reductions, but health officials need to plan now for how a changing climate will impact local populations and communities.

“We need to help people adapt,” Dr. Mitchell said. “We’re going to be doing damage control and we need to figure out how to do that systematically.”

Don Hopey: dhopey@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1983.

View original post here: 

Climate change to boost health problems

Archaeology, historic preservation company CHRS Inc. exhumes pieces of the past


View and purchase photos

A motorist slows down when he notices the archaeologists from Cultural Heritage Resource Services Inc. in Lansdale have returned to their Delaware County dig site.

Recently snow and extreme cold have delayed this third and final phase of the stratified layer excavation. But today temperatures will reach the 30s, and warm sunlight is shining just right in the area of the Marcus Hook SEPTA train station.

“Find any gold yet?” the passing motorist asks.

Archaeologist Rachael Fowler explains that there is a historical society in town, and its headquarters, The Plank House, was frequented by the infamous pirate Blackbeard because his mistress lived there.

When he was in these parts centuries ago, Blackbeard’s agenda was not likely to involve hiding pirate plunder, Fowler opined.

The approximately one-acre area of the dig, marked off with orange mesh plastic fencing, puts them right on top of people’s back yards.

“We try to be as unobtrusive as possible,” she said of the high-traffic residential area.

The circa 1927 bridge that crosses over the train station is due for replacement. CHRS Director of Archaeology Tom Lewis said that per state law, just as an engineering or environmental survey is required before construction begins, projects of this nature require an excavation for artifacts of historical or cultural significance. Although this seemingly guarantees work for archaeological firms like CHRS, Lewis pointed out that state budget cuts can take that work away.

According to Fowler, most people think the crew of seven CHRS archaeologists are looking for dinosaur bones or buried treasure. In this case, the buried treasure they’re unearthing is artifacts such as antique glass bottles, children’s toys and dish fragments that came from three late 19th century to early 20th century homes that exist only on historical maps and deed records. What they find will be taken back to the CHRS offices on Cannon Avenue, carefully washed off, labeled and cataloged. CHRS has promised a detailed report, likely to be written by Fowler, to both PennDOT and the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.

Lewis, who has worked for CHRS 29 years, noted that Marcus Hook had one of the first successful African-American communities in the USA, and wondered if these homes might have some link to that history. Continued…

So far, the best proof that there were houses here are the brick-lined privy shafts that have been uncovered. Since the homes that once stood here were built before organized trash removal, “they had to fill it out with refuse after taking the nasty stuff out,” Fowler said, referring to the shafts’ original use as outhouse pits.

“We’ll be able to tell what they threw away. We’ll find bones with butcher marks,” she said.

“The Philadelphia area was pretty into shellfish at the turn of the century,” Lewis said when asked about clam shells that may have been buried for 100 years.

Cultural heritage preservation is something that Mike Rowe has likely tried on the TV show “Dirty Jobs.”

“You’re going to get pretty gross,” Fowler says, noticing that this writer has worn work boots and cold weather outerwear, but not ski pants or insulated pants.

“I’ve been out in days with -18 wind chill. There will be ticks (in warmer conditions). There will be poison ivy. Still, it’s better than my best day at a desk job,” Fowler said.

Despite the cold, and the sloppy, muddy ground, the dig site is abuzz with activity. Discolorations in the soil have been found, suggesting more filled-in holes. Clumps of dirt are being set aside to be shaken through a screen; some will have to wait until they thaw. Archaeologist Adam Richardson has pulled some glass medicine bottles from the ground. That the bottles are unbroken is a lucky find. Lewis is examining the site from multiple angles through the lens of a surveyor’s camera. Per procedure, the entire dig site has to be mapped and graphed, showing grid-by-grid what was found where, and how far down.

Specific areas of the site are referred to as test units, which represent a cubic meter and roughly a ton of dirt. Two people are assigned to each test unit.

The sample of the archaeologist’s tools of the trade include shovels; root clippers; screens; trowels; split spoon samplers, which take a 20-cm. core sample that shows if there are changes in the soil; and an array of measuring tools, including a submeter GPS.

The dig, which began in September, will — he hopes — be wrapped up by April, Lewis said. Continued…

To learn more about CHRS, visit

www.chrsinc.com

.

A motorist slows down when he notices the archaeologists from Cultural Heritage Resource Services Inc. in Lansdale have returned to their Delaware County dig site.

Recently snow and extreme cold have delayed this third and final phase of the stratified layer excavation. But today temperatures will reach the 30s, and warm sunlight is shining just right in the area of the Marcus Hook SEPTA train station.

“Find any gold yet?” the passing motorist asks.

Archaeologist Rachael Fowler explains that there is a historical society in town, and its headquarters, The Plank House, was frequented by the infamous pirate Blackbeard because his mistress lived there.

When he was in these parts centuries ago, Blackbeard’s agenda was not likely to involve hiding pirate plunder, Fowler opined.

The approximately one-acre area of the dig, marked off with orange mesh plastic fencing, puts them right on top of people’s back yards.

“We try to be as unobtrusive as possible,” she said of the high-traffic residential area.

The circa 1927 bridge that crosses over the train station is due for replacement. CHRS Director of Archaeology Tom Lewis said that per state law, just as an engineering or environmental survey is required before construction begins, projects of this nature require an excavation for artifacts of historical or cultural significance. Although this seemingly guarantees work for archaeological firms like CHRS, Lewis pointed out that state budget cuts can take that work away.

According to Fowler, most people think the crew of seven CHRS archaeologists are looking for dinosaur bones or buried treasure. In this case, the buried treasure they’re unearthing is artifacts such as antique glass bottles, children’s toys and dish fragments that came from three late 19th century to early 20th century homes that exist only on historical maps and deed records. What they find will be taken back to the CHRS offices on Cannon Avenue, carefully washed off, labeled and cataloged. CHRS has promised a detailed report, likely to be written by Fowler, to both PennDOT and the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.

Lewis, who has worked for CHRS 29 years, noted that Marcus Hook had one of the first successful African-American communities in the USA, and wondered if these homes might have some link to that history.

So far, the best proof that there were houses here are the brick-lined privy shafts that have been uncovered. Since the homes that once stood here were built before organized trash removal, “they had to fill it out with refuse after taking the nasty stuff out,” Fowler said, referring to the shafts’ original use as outhouse pits.

“We’ll be able to tell what they threw away. We’ll find bones with butcher marks,” she said.

“The Philadelphia area was pretty into shellfish at the turn of the century,” Lewis said when asked about clam shells that may have been buried for 100 years.

Cultural heritage preservation is something that Mike Rowe has likely tried on the TV show “Dirty Jobs.”

“You’re going to get pretty gross,” Fowler says, noticing that this writer has worn work boots and cold weather outerwear, but not ski pants or insulated pants.

“I’ve been out in days with -18 wind chill. There will be ticks (in warmer conditions). There will be poison ivy. Still, it’s better than my best day at a desk job,” Fowler said.

Despite the cold, and the sloppy, muddy ground, the dig site is abuzz with activity. Discolorations in the soil have been found, suggesting more filled-in holes. Clumps of dirt are being set aside to be shaken through a screen; some will have to wait until they thaw. Archaeologist Adam Richardson has pulled some glass medicine bottles from the ground. That the bottles are unbroken is a lucky find. Lewis is examining the site from multiple angles through the lens of a surveyor’s camera. Per procedure, the entire dig site has to be mapped and graphed, showing grid-by-grid what was found where, and how far down.

Specific areas of the site are referred to as test units, which represent a cubic meter and roughly a ton of dirt. Two people are assigned to each test unit.

The sample of the archaeologist’s tools of the trade include shovels; root clippers; screens; trowels; split spoon samplers, which take a 20-cm. core sample that shows if there are changes in the soil; and an array of measuring tools, including a submeter GPS.

The dig, which began in September, will — he hopes — be wrapped up by April, Lewis said.

To learn more about CHRS, visit www.chrsinc.com.

Source: 

Archaeology, historic preservation company CHRS Inc. exhumes pieces of the past

Hapten Sciences, Inc. and Particle Sciences, Inc. Partner to Bring Hapten's Poison Ivy Product Into Clinical Trials

BETHLEHEM, Pa., Jan. ;28, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — ;Particle Sciences, Inc. a drug delivery Contract Development and Manufacturing Organization (CDMO), has partnered with Hapten Sciences, Inc. to progress Hapten’s lead product into the clinic. ;The product is a vaccine developed to lessen or eliminate contact dermatitis from Poison Ivy, Oak and Sumac exposure. ;According to Raymond Hage, CEO of Hapten, “Experts report that 50 to 85 percent of the population in the United States is sensitive to urushiol and, when adequately exposed, will suffer an allergic reaction. Aside from the actual physical discomfort, these reactions cost the federal government and private business millions each year in lost workdays. ;For instance, in the western US, annually, about one third of US Forest Service Firefighters will leave a fire as a result of exposure to Poison Ivy, Oak or Sumac.” ;Particle Sciences will be manufacturing the Phase I/II materials of Hapten’s first human studies scheduled for 2014. ;According to Mark Mitchnick, MD, Particle Sciences’ CEO, “We have worked with Hapten in the past and are delighted to be helping them bring this important product to market. ;This a great use of our sterile solution manufacturing capacity: ;producing and filling a novel product along with providing complete analytic (service info) and release testing (service info). ; We have steadily expanded or cGMP manufacturing capacity with a focus on sterile and otherwise challenging products and have several in the queue already for early 2014.”

Particle Sciences, Inc. is an integrated pharmaceutical CDMO. ; Particle Sciences focuses on BCS II/III/IV molecules, biologics and highly potent compounds through a variety of technologies including emulsions, gels, micro and nano-particulates, drug/device combination products, solid solutions and others. Particle Sciences is FDA registered and DEA licensed. Through a full range of formulation, analytic, and manufacturing services, Particle Sciences provides pharmaceutical companies with a complete and seamless development solution that minimizes the time and risk between discovery and the clinic. ; The company was founded in 1991 and is headquartered in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. ; Visit www.particlesciences.com, email info@particlesciences.com or contact us at (610) 861-4701 for information.

Hapten Sciences, Inc. is a privately held biopharmaceutical company based in Memphis, Tennessee. The company’s mission is to identify and efficiently develop novel, early-stage products that will significantly contribute to the health and well-being of people around the world. ; The company’s initial product is a small molecule that acts like a vaccine to prevent the extremely painful itching and rash (contact dermatitis) caused by exposure to urushiol (yoo-ROO-she-ol) oil in poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac plants. The development of the this product is progressing and Hapten intends to begin clinical trials this year.

Contact:
Maureen Grieco
Maureen.Grieco@particlesciences.com ;

SOURCE Particle Sciences, Inc.

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Hapten Sciences, Inc. and Particle Sciences, Inc. Partner to Bring Hapten's Poison Ivy Product Into Clinical Trials

Itchapalooza 2013: Climate Change Fuels Poison Ivy Boom

It takes a Pennsylvania journalist to educate me on why so much poison ivy is growing along the paths and up the trees in my home state of New York this summer.

Global warming is literally changing the chemistry of poison ivy; experts believe it has doubled in strength since the 1960s.

According to the Pittsburgh ;Post-Gazette, it’s ;global warming, stupid! And apparently it’s a countrywide problem.

It also partially explains why there have been more bears walking through the backyard this summer, since they love to munch on the urushiol soaked leaves, the name for the oil or sap that lives on the skin of poison ivy and is such a pain for 85 percent of people.

An increase in carbon dioxide encourages plant growth like some kind of super fertilizer. And for some yet uncertain reason, poison ivy is proving especially greedy when it comes to CO2, sucking it down and spreading through fields and strangling trees at a record pace.

According to field studies by the Department of Agriculture, as long as CO2 levels keep rising, poison ivy will keep spreading, in some places virulently. It’s not just the number of plants that are growing, but also the potency of its poison. Global warming is literally changing the chemistry of the poison ivy; experts believe it has doubled in strength since the 1960s.

Poison ivy is not the only plant being impacted by global warming. Other studies, one by the biology department at Southwestern University in 2010, shows how an increase in CO2 increases photosynthesis in plants and encourages some to grow 30 to 40 percent faster. This is not necessarily a good thing. Even as they are growing faster, nitrogen levels in the plants are decreasing—as are othere important minerals including calcium, magnesium and phosphorous—which makes them drastically less nutritious for the herbivores (and man) that depend on them.

So, this is our future. Dirtier air and faster growing, evil-intended plants. I’m guessing next we’ll see news stories confirming that cockroaches and rats somehow thrive on increases in CO2. (Somewhat to the contrary, if you believe that superstorms, like Sandy, are encouraged by global warming they are proving to be hard on rat populations. The rat population in NYC went down post-Sandy, due to drowning.)

Be careful out there! Poison ivy’s ill effects aren’t only gained from brushing up against it in the woods. If its vines are burned or even churned up by weed whacker or lawn mower, the poisonous oil can become airborne and impact susceptible lungs.

What can you do about this advance, if you’re among the majority badly infected by poison ivy, the itchy, pimply blisters of which can last for several days?

First and foremost, learn to identify the plant. And then stay far away from it. Truth is, if you show the plant to most they mistake it for something innocuous, even marijuana.

Some Forest Service employees spray antiperspirant deodorant on exposed skin because the aluminum chlorohydrate may help prevent the oil from penetrating skin. (A human form of geo-engineering!)

At our house, where others are very susceptible, we keep a big, red bottle of Tecnu soap next to the sink all summer long and at the merest inkling of a brush-up there’s a rush for cold water and soap. (If you think you’ve made contact, move fast. The oil on the leaves, which is the ‘poison’ in poison ivy, often doesn’t sink into skin for about 15 minutes.) Jumping in a cold pond or pool is a possible instant remedy; Calamine lotion and ice can work after the fact.

It’s not like the measles or chicken pox. Apparently once you’ve had an allergic reaction to poison ivy you become even more at risk.

Original source: takepart.com

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