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October 17, 2018

Watch: Michigan Woman Goes Missing After Halloween Party

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Michigan Woman Goes Missing After Halloween Party

Chelsea Ellen Bruck, 22, was last seen leaving a party while dressed as Batman character Poison Ivy.

01:57
| 10/30/2014

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Watch: Michigan Woman Goes Missing After Halloween Party

Ticks, mosquitoes on the rise in Iowa


Ticks, mosquitoes on the rise in Iowa

New report warns of climate impact on wildlife

By Gabriella Dunn, The Gazette

Published:

August 19 2014 | 6:21 pm – Updated: 19 August 2014 | 6:44 pm

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DES MOINES — Ballooning amounts of ticks, mosquitoes and poison ivy are invading Iowa because of climate change, and the increase will bring higher rates for disease, according to a report by the Iowa Wildlife Federation.

The report, titled “Ticked Off — America’s Outdoor Experience and Climate Change,” outlined effects on the outdoors from rising carbon dioxide rates, increased humidity and altered seasons like milder winters.

“If we keep the status quo the way we’re living, it will keep getting worse and we will start seeing diseases we never dreamed about coming to our soil,” said Dr. Yogesh Shah, associate dean of the Department of Global Health at Des Moines University.

To illustrate his point, Shah highlighted the rise of Chikungunya, a viral disease transmitted by mosquito bites, which starts with cold-like symptoms and then persists as joint pains for up to several years. Chikungunya, he said, was hardly discussed just six months ago, but will likely become more prevalent.

Shah said that with every degree increase in temperature, mosquito population increases by nearly tenfold — plus the viruses are living longer in each mosquito.

The report found that more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, mainly from burning fossil fuels, is causing poison ivy to grow more rapidly and with stronger toxicity.

“If a drop used to cause a rash, now it’s just half a drop,” Shah said.

Deer ticks that carry Lyme disease are expected to be “more widespread than ever before” because of milder winters.

“Climate change is not so subtle anymore,” said Joe Wilkinson, president of the Iowa Wildlife Federation. “With temperatures going up a degree to two, as a human, I can handle that. But what will be the cumulative effect?”

The report encourages people to reduce carbon pollution, invest in clean energy, increase energy efficiency, put buffers around farmland to keep soil in place, clean stagnant pools of water where mosquitoes breed and wear protective clothing outdoors.


New Vitality Health Foods, Inc. Provides Tips on How to Naturally Treat Common Summertime Ailments

The New Vitality Health Foods, Inc staff are knowledgable in the variety of natural and homeopathic remedies the store carries, and can assist you in selecting the proper product.

People more vulnerable to food poisoning include children, the elderly, pregnant women and anyone with a compromised immune system.

Orland Park, IL (PRWEB) May 28, 2014

Insect Bites

Before going outdoors, it is important to protect against disease carrying mosquitoes and tics by using an all natural insect repellent such as Buzz Away Extreme or Green Beaver. New Vitality Health Foods, Inc. carries both brands.

While most bites and stings will heal on their own, they can present some irritable reactions. New Vitality Health Foods, Inc. recommends the following natural remedies to help relieve insect bite pain, itching, and swelling:

1. Apply an ice pack or a cool wet cloth to a bite or sting for 15 to 20 minutes once an hour.

2. Try putting witch hazel or underarm deodorant on the bite to help stop itching.

3. An antihistamine, such as Benadryl or Chlor-Trimeton, may help relieve itching, redness, and swelling. Don’t give antihistamines to a child unless you’ve checked with the doctor first.

4. New Vitality Health Foods Inc. carries Sting Stop by Boericke and Tafel, both help relieve itching and redness.

Watch for an extreme allergic reaction following an insect bite. Seek immediate medical attention if airway restriction occurs or extreme swelling at the bite sight.

Poison Ivy, Oak, and Sumac Plants

The poison ivy rash can be transmitted by: direct contact with the plant; indirect contact when you touch pets, gardening tools, sports equipment, or other objects that had direct contact with the plant; or airborne contact from burning these plants, which releases particles of urushiol into the air that can penetrate the skin, eyes, nose, throat, or respiratory system. Poison ivy is extremely contagious. It is important bedding is washed daily and towels are not shared.

Symptoms, which generally last from one to two weeks, include:

  • Red streaks or patches
  • Itching
  • Rash
  • Swelling
  • Blisters that may “weep” (leak fluid) and later crust over
  • Inflammation and a burning sensation

New Vitality Health Foods, Inc. recommends the following natural remedies to help relieve poison ivy symptoms:

1. Immediately wash the rash with mild soap, but do not scrub.

2. Put a wet cloth on the rash to ease pain and itching.

3. Homeopathic Rhus Tox for Poison Ivy Remedy by Hylands relieve poison ivy symptoms.

4. Baking soda is a natural remedy for the itchiness. To help relieve itching, place 1/2 a cup of baking soda in a bath tub filled with warm water. You can also mix three teaspoons of baking soda with one teaspoon of water and mix until it forms a paste. Apply this paste to the infected area to relieve itching and irritation.

5. Witch hazel can help relieve the itch of poison ivy and tightens skin. The cooling, soothing extract will not get rid of the rash, but it will calm it down.

6. Aloe vera will help to relieve itching skin. Compounds in aloe help to accelerate wound healing.

7. Tea tree oil soothes the itch of poison ivy and serves as an anti-inflammatory.

Summertime Food Poisoning

Food poisoning is a real risk when taking food outside the home for packed lunches, picnics, camping, and other outdoor events, especially in warmer weather. High-risk foods for contamination include meat, poultry, dairy products, eggs, seafood, cooked rice and pasta, and ready-to-eat foods. People more vulnerable to food poisoning include children, the elderly, pregnant women and anyone with a compromised immune system.

At first signs of symptoms, take equal parts water and apple cider vinegar. In water or some kind of soft food, take 1/2 tsp or more of activated charcoal (or capsules if you can swallow them). Repeat until symptoms stop. Both of these products are available at New Vitality Health Foods, Inc.

Sunburn

To help elevate the pain, redness and swelling that can accompany sunburn, New Vitality Health Foods, Inc. recommends:

1. Witch hazel is an incredible astringent has been shown to have long-lasting anti-inflammatory relief. Apply often for temporary relief.

2. Do not soak in soapy water because they can dry and irritate burned skin. Do not rub your skin, or you’ll irritate it further. In order to reduce pain, itching, and inflammation, try adding vinegar to bath water. Mix 1 cup of white or apple cider vinegar into a tub of cool water. Baking soda can also offer relief. Generously sprinkle baking soda into tepid bathwater. Instead of toweling off, let the solution dry on your skin. It is completely nontoxic, and it will soothe the pain.

3. Just Aloe Gel for sunburn will help soothe sunburn.

About New Vitality Health Foods, Inc.:

Established in 1988, New Vitality Health Foods, Inc. provides Chicagoland’s largest selection of allergy-free foods that have met their high standards for taste, quality, and nutrition. New allergy-free foods are introduced weekly. They also carry frozen foods, vitamins, herbs, homeopathic, aromatherapy, body care, pet care, household items, and much more. New Vitality features only the highest quality, effective nutritional supplements to support their customers’ total health. New Vitality Health Foods, Inc. is located at 9177 West 151st Street, Orland Park, IL 60462; (708) 403-0120; http://www.newvitalityhealthfoods.com.


From:

New Vitality Health Foods, Inc. Provides Tips on How to Naturally Treat Common Summertime Ailments

10 Health Woes Summer Can Bring

Summer’s almost here, and so are microbes and other environmental woes that can bring your sun and surf fun into a halt.

Among the infections that tend to come when the temperatures rise, some are mild while others can be deadly.  From poisonous plants to “brain-eating” amoebas, here are ten health hazards you should be aware of this summer:

Valley fever

Valley fever, also called coccidioidomycosis, is an infection by a fungus that lives in soil. People become infected by breathing in the spores of the fungi from the air.

This fungus is thought to grow best in soil after heavy rainfall, and then to disperse into the air during hot, dry conditions. Researchers have found an increase in the number of infection during hot and dry weather conditions, for example during drought, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

In the U.S., these fungi are found in Western states including California and Arizona, but have also been recently found in south-central Washington.

It is difficult to prevent breathing in fungal spores, but people who live in or travel to areas where the fungi are common, can try to avoid spending time in dusty places as much as possible. Most people who become infected experience flu-like symptoms, and get better on their own within two to three months, but some need antifungal medication, according to the CDC.

West Nile virus

West Nile virus lives in birds and mosquitoes, and is transmitted to people by mosquito bites. In the United States, infections tend to rise starting June, and the number of cases peaks in the middle of August, according to the CDC.

Most infected people show no symptoms, but some develop a fever, headache and nausea. About 1 percent of people develop a serious neurologic illness such as encephalitis, meningitis or paralysis, and about 10 percent of people in this group die from their infection.

You can reduce the risk of getting infected with West Nile virus by using insect repellent and wearing protective clothing, such as long sleeves and pants, to prevent mosquito bites.

Brain-eating amoeba

The Naegleria fowleri is a heat-loving microscopic amoeba living in warm freshwater, for example lakes, rivers, and hot springs. It can also be found in soil. Most cases of infection with this amoeba have occurred during the summer months.

People usually get infected by swimming in warm, fresh water. Water containing the parasite can enter the body through the nose, and then travel to the brain and cause deadly inflammation of the brain and the membrane that surrounds it.

Infections with Naegleria fowleri are rare – in the 10 years from 2003 to 2012, 31 infections were reported in the United States, according to the CDC. But most people who become infected don’t survive.

Lyme disease

Deer ticks that carry the Lyme disease bacteria are most active during the spring, early summer and fall. They ticks favor shady, humid environments, and can be found clinging to grass, in lawns and gardens, at the edges of woods, and in old stone walls, according to New York’s Department of Health.

To protect yourself from tick bites and Lyme disease, avoid walking in places where ticks are likely to live, and use insect repellents and skin covering clothing.

Poison ivy, sumac and oak

Some 80 to 90 percent of people are allergic to an oil in the sap of plants such as poison ivy, poison sumac and poison oak, according to the American Academy of Dermatology.

People are more likely to come into contact with these plants in summertime when they are more common. The allergic reaction causes a painful and itching rash, which can often be treated with over-the-counter topical lotions and antihistamines. Learning about how these plants look like can help avoiding contact.

Ear Infection

Swimmer’s ear, also called otitis externa, is a common infection of the outer ear canal that results in about 2.4 million doctor’s visits and $500 million in health care costs each year, according to the CDC.

To prevent getting an ear infection from organisms living in the water, use a bathing cap or ear plug when swimming, and dry your ears well with a towel after swimming. Leave your ear wax alone, though, because it helps protect your ear canal from infection.

Hyperthermia

Extreme heat kills about 650 Americans yearly, and sends many more to emergency rooms, according to the CDC. To put things into perspective, between 1979 and 2003 more people have died from extreme heat than from tornadoes, hurricanes, floods and earthquakes combined.

Extreme heat causes hyperthermia, a condition in which a person’s body absorbs more heat than it dissipates. Hyperthermia can lead to dangerously high body temperatures that require medical attention.

To stay safe, the CDC recommends using air conditioning during hot summer days, keeping hydrated, and checking at least twice a day on the elderly and those who have other medical conditions that put them at higher risk for heat-related problems. Also, never leave children, or pets, in a parked car.

Hand, foot, and mouth disease

Hand, foot, and mouth disease is a viral infection that usually affects children younger than 5 years old, but can occur in adults too. Patients experience fever, mouth sores, and a skin rash, according to the CDC.

There’s no vaccine to protect against the viruses that cause hand, foot, and mouth disease, but maintaining personal hygiene such as washing hands and disinfecting common surfaces or toys can lower the risk of infection.

Kidney stones

Another thing to be wary of during the summer is dehydration, which doctors say contributes to a peak in number of people developing kidney stones.

As you sweat, the body loses water and makes less urine, which allows for stone-causing minerals to form stones in the kidneys and urinary tract.

Hantavirus

This virus, carried by rodents, can cause a rare but deadly disease called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. During summer months when people spend more time outdoors, they are more likely to come in contact with droppings of infected rodents, and become infected. Also, when fresh rodent urine or droppings are stirred up, tiny droplets containing the virus get into the air and can infect people through inhalation. 

To avoid contact with the virus, people are advised to keep their homes and workplace rodent-free and be cautious of mouse activity in campsites, parks and cabins where they plan to spend time.

Email Bahar Gholipour or follow her @alterwired. Follow us @LiveScience, Facebook & Google+. Original article on Live Science.

Copyright 2014 LiveScience, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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10 Health Woes Summer Can Bring

Avoid Poison Ivy Peril


Continue reading here – 

Avoid Poison Ivy Peril

Dangers of burning poison ivy

The chill in the air makes this time of year prime time bonfire season, and here in Sportsman’s Paradise: hunting season. But before you clear out the brush from your hunting camp or light any brush on fire, pay special attention to this warning on what you burn.

When Todd Taylor and his wife, Ashley, moved into a new home in Moss Bluff – the first step was to clear out some of the old brush. “We started raking up pine straw and we threw the pine straw onto the pile. We started trimming trees,” he said.

Then the pile was set on fire. Todd kept an eye on it, inadvertently breathing in the smoke.

The next day, Todd’s eyelids turned blood red. Then his health took a nose dive. “I start throwing up, I have chills, I’m running fever,” he said.

Todd thought it might be a temporary virus, until his skin broke out. All over his body, painful, itchy rashes started popping up. “I’ve had some blisters in my eyebrows, irritation on my neck, all over my arms,” he said.

Those symptoms were not new to this country boy that can recognize a reaction to poison ivy. “I know this is poison ivy. I’ve been down this road before, but my eyes were still kind of reddish,” he said.

Todd decided to go to see a doctor. The diagnosis: systemic poison ivy. Imperial Health Ear, Nose and Throat Specialist Bridget Loehn explains, “Systemic poison ivy is an extreme allergic reaction to the oils from the poison ivy plant.”

It was not physically touching the poison ivy plant that sickened Todd. It was breathing in the oils of the plant as it burned, traveling from the lungs to the blood stream.

Fortunately, Todd’s case cleared up with steroids, allergy medicine and antihistamines. But Dr. Loehn says the symptoms can be life-threatening. “Symptoms of nausea, vomiting, fever, they can have swollen lymph nodes and even develop respiratory difficulties.”

If you do not spend a lot of time in the woods, you may not know how to recognize poison ivy. Here is an easy way to remember: leaves of three, let it be. Vines with hair, beware!

“It’s just a good reminder to go look up pictures and be familiar with what poison ivy, poison oak, poison sumac looks like,” said Todd, “because it is very indigenous to the area.”

It is also important to note that even if you have burned poison ivy before and had no health problems, your neighbors could be affected by inhaling the burning plant’s oils.

Copyright KPLC 2013. All rights reserved.

Link:  

Dangers of burning poison ivy

Poison ivy It's getting stronger and tougher

Mark Laliberte is used to getting poison ivy, but the reaction he suffered in July was the worst ever.

The 37-year-old Candia man was clearing brush on his property when he slipped into some bushes.

“I didn’t see it, but once I fell into it, I knew it was poison ivy. I ran inside and showered, but it was too late. It was all over my face and neck, particularly on my left side,” he said.

Beth Almon’s doctor told her she has the worst case of poison ivy she’s ever seen. After battling the itch for three weeks, Almon is now on her second batch of Prednisone, a drug used to treat severe allergic reactions.

“This year, for some odd reason I can’t get rid of it out of my system,” said Almon, 32, of Raymond.

The reason for the severe cases may have something to do with changes in the poison ivy plant caused by higher levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, experts say.

Poison ivy is thriving and becoming much more potent, according to Lewis H. Ziska, a research weed ecologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Ziska has studied the effects of carbon dioxide on plants and has found that it’s changing the chemistry of the urushiol oil in poison ivy, making it more toxic and more likely to cause a skin reaction.

His research looked at how plants react to more sunlight appearing in forests that have become fragmented, especially in urban areas. Ziska found that poison ivy flourishes, spreading faster and becoming more potent.

“Poison ivy tends to do better than most of the plant species we looked at. It’s able to take in the additional carbon dioxide and convert it into additional growth,” he said.

While she hasn’t seen more poison ivy sufferers than usual, Dr. Ellen Bernard of Epping Regional Health Center said there are treatments available to ease the itching and clear things up. Topical steroids can be used, but more severe cases may require an oral steroid.

Susan Chadwick, director of marketing at Derry Medical Center, said she takes steps to avoid poison ivy, but still ended up with a case in July.

“I’m very sensitive to it, so I try like the devil to avoid it,” said Chadwick, whose colleague also suffered a severe reaction this summer and ended up on Prednisone.

jschreiber@newstote.com

View this article:

Poison ivy It's getting stronger and tougher

Poison ivy It's getting stronger and tougher

Mark Laliberte is used to getting poison ivy, but the reaction he suffered in July was the worst ever.

The 37-year-old Candia man was clearing brush on his property when he slipped into some bushes.

“I didn’t see it, but once I fell into it, I knew it was poison ivy. I ran inside and showered, but it was too late. It was all over my face and neck, particularly on my left side,” he said.

Beth Almon’s doctor told her she has the worst case of poison ivy she’s ever seen. After battling the itch for three weeks, Almon is now on her second batch of Prednisone, a drug used to treat severe allergic reactions.

“This year, for some odd reason I can’t get rid of it out of my system,” said Almon, 32, of Raymond.

The reason for the severe cases may have something to do with changes in the poison ivy plant caused by higher levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, experts say.

Poison ivy is thriving and becoming much more potent, according to Lewis H. Ziska, a research weed ecologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Ziska has studied the effects of carbon dioxide on plants and has found that it’s changing the chemistry of the urushiol oil in poison ivy, making it more toxic and more likely to cause a skin reaction.

His research looked at how plants react to more sunlight appearing in forests that have become fragmented, especially in urban areas. Ziska found that poison ivy flourishes, spreading faster and becoming more potent.

“Poison ivy tends to do better than most of the plant species we looked at. It’s able to take in the additional carbon dioxide and convert it into additional growth,” he said.

While she hasn’t seen more poison ivy sufferers than usual, Dr. Ellen Bernard of Epping Regional Health Center said there are treatments available to ease the itching and clear things up. Topical steroids can be used, but more severe cases may require an oral steroid.

Susan Chadwick, director of marketing at Derry Medical Center, said she takes steps to avoid poison ivy, but still ended up with a case in July.

“I’m very sensitive to it, so I try like the devil to avoid it,” said Chadwick, whose colleague also suffered a severe reaction this summer and ended up on Prednisone.

jschreiber@newstote.com

Original link:

Poison ivy It's getting stronger and tougher

Poison Parsnip: Toxic And Invasive

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Poison Parsnip: Toxic And Invasive

Poison Parsnip

Poison Parsnip plants are toxic and invasive. They are also growing wild across the nation. The weeds are native to Asia and Europe. However, they are now common in nearly every US state.

Wild parsnip plants are usually found in areas where other common weeds thrive, including backyards. They are an invasive species that can spread rapidly and wipe out other plant species in the area. Even worse, the plant oils can cause health concerns.

As reported by The Poison Garden, poison parsnip can cause a blistering skin rash, similar to those caused by poison ivy. However, the rash produced by wild parsnip is usually more severe. The symptoms generally disappear after a few weeks, but may discolor the skin for months.

The plants share their name with edible parsnips, which are grown for food. Unlike the edible variety, wild parsnips should be avoided.

Wild parsnip plants can rapidly spread, taking over yards and flower beds. However, they can be eliminated from the yard through diligent care. As reported by FDL Reporter, the poison parsnips can be eliminated with herbicide application in the fall or spring.

Those who wish to avoid chemicals can keep the weeds cut at ground level or mowed. Gloves should always be worn when handling the plants to avoid an adverse reaction.

As discussed by the Vermont Department of Health, wild parsnips are green plants that produce tiny yellow flowers. They are similar in appearance to Queen Anne’s Lace.

They are closely related to carrots, and produce similar sized roots. The flowers do not appear until their second year of growth. Mature plants can reach up to four feet in height.

The health department suggests thoroughly washing with soap and water if skin comes into contact with the plants. As sunlight may trigger a reaction, avoiding sunlight for 48 hours may decrease the risk. If blisters form a doctor should be contacted.

Poison Parsnip

Clothes that come into contact with the plants should also be thoroughly washed as the oils may linger.

Poison parsnip can be toxic and is certainly invasive. However, with care, they can be avoided and eliminated, reducing the risks.

[Image via Wikimedia]


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Poison Parsnip: Toxic And Invasive

Health talk: Poison ivy dermatitis

It’s that time of year again when patient’s start clamoring for steroids to treat their poison ivy.

However, oral corticosteroids are not always appropriate for treating poison ivy dermatitis. Oral corticosteroids have significant side effects that can change your mood, increase your appetite and disrupt your sleep, as well as affect the metabolic processes in your body. If dosed incorrectly or taken for too short an interval, it can result in a “steroid flare” with the poison ivy dermatitis returning worse than it was originally.

Learn how to identify poison ivy and avoid it. It typically has clusters of three leaves, color can range from green to red, and it grows as vines, single stalks or shrubs. A Google search will provide images to improve your identification skills.

If you know you are going to be exposed to poison ivy, wear long clothing, although the resin from these plants can soak through clothes and come in contact with skin. Heavy duty vinyl gloves are the best option to avoid exposure.

After possible exposure wash all of your clothes (don’t forget your footwear) and clean any tools that may have been exposed to the resin with detergent. The resin can remain on objects for days and each time you contact it, you re-expose yourself to the allergen. Shower and wash with a mild detergent, such as Dial dishwashing detergent — we keep a bar of FELS-NAPTHA laundry soap in the shower and use it after any possible contact with these plants (commercial products are available but are more expensive).

The resin from poison ivy is highly allergenic. It typically takes 12-96 hours to develop a rash, with symptoms peaking between one and 14 days after exposure. Symptoms are redness and intense itching with development of raised bumps and vesicles, often in a linear pattern. The time to develop a rash and the severity of the rash depends on how much resin you were exposed to and the thickness of your skin. This is why people often think the rash is “spreading.” However, the liquid from the vesicles does not spread the rash, and it cannot be spread to someone else. You can continue to re-expose yourself if something has the resin on it, such as your clothes, garden tools or even your pets.

Treat symptoms with cool baths and calamine lotion. Popping blisters can be treated with Burrow’s solution. Contact your physician if you are concerned about secondary bacterial infection, or if the rash is severe, involves your face or genitals or if you do not improve after 2-3 weeks.

Medical treatment with high dose topical corticosteroids can relieve symptoms and shorten the course of the reaction. Oral corticosteroids may be prescribed if the rash is severe covering a significant portion of the body or if it is on the face or genitals. Once again, corticosteroids — topical and oral — can have significant side effects and are often only used in severe situation, so let’s try to prevent “the poison” this summer and avoid side effects of treatment.

Dr. Lara Kauffman is a board certified family physician at Carlisle Family Care. She graduated from Penn State College of Medicine in 2005 and has been practicing in Central Pennsylvania for the past five years.

Kauffman is one of five Carlisle Regional Medical Center staffers contributing to the weekly Health Talk column, to appear in The Sentinel every Sunday.

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Health talk: Poison ivy dermatitis

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