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December 12, 2018

Got an itch? Allergy to moistened wipes rising, says dermatologist

More and more people are developing an itchy, painful rash in an effort to stay clean. A dermatologist at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center says a preservative in many types of pre-moistened wipes is linked to a dramatic rise in allergic reactions.

“In the last two or three years, we’ve suddenly seen a big increase in people with this type of allergy,” said Dr. Matthew Zirwas, director of the contact dermatitis center at Ohio State’s Wexner Medical Center. “For some patients, their rash has been unexplained and going on for years.”

Zirwas says the chemical preservative is MI (methylisothiazolinone) and it has been around for years. MI is found in many water-based products like liquid soaps, hair products, sunscreen, cosmetics, laundry products and cleaners as well as pre-moistened personal hygiene products and baby wipes.

“Concentrations of the preservative have increased dramatically in some products in the last few years, as manufacturers stopped using other preservatives like paraben and formaldehyde,” Zirwas said.

The irritated skin can be red, raised, itchy and even blistery, appearing much like a reaction to poison ivy. The three most common areas affected by the allergic reaction include the face, from using soaps and shampoos, the fingers and hands, from handling the wipes, and the buttocks and genitals from using moistened flushable wipes.

Julie Omiatek, an Ohio mother of two, says it took a year to figure out her allergy. All that time, she endured the rashes on her hands and face.

“I tried to look for patterns and I journaled every time I had a flare-up,” Omiatek said. “My allergist referred me to Dr. Zirwas’ clinic and, lo and behold, it was a preservative in the baby wipes I was using. I was really surprised, because I thought that the allergy would have appeared with my first child.”

“If someone suspects an allergy to moistened wipes, they need to stop using them for at least one month. A week or two isn’t enough time,” Zirwas said.

Zirwas is nationally-known as a kind of ‘dermatologist detective.’ He has spent nearly 10 years sleuthing out the causes of mysterious rashes that others can’t solve. Over the years, he has identified allergies to shoe glue, hot tub chemicals, nickel in food, even a chemical in escalator hand rails. Patients have traveled from as far as Alaska to have him diagnose their skin allergies.

Zirwas says it isn’t clear how many Americans might react to MI, but he says manufacturers are aware of the growing allergy problem and are working on alternatives.

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

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Got an itch? Allergy to moistened wipes rising, says dermatologist

Gear We Love: Tecnu Poison Ivy Relief

Gear We Love: Tecnu Poison Ivy Relief

By Dougald MacDonald

Here’s how allergic to poison ivy I am: When I was a kid, I once caught poison ivy in the middle of winter, even though there was a foot of snow on the ground. It was so bad I had to go to the doctor to treat the oozing blisters that threatened to seal my eyes. He said, “It looks like poison ivy…but it can’t be. It’s the middle of winter.”

I still get PI frequently, even in winter. Recently, I caught it twice in one month, from the very same bush. (I’m a slow learner.) I was frequenting a good sunny crag near home, and the best warm-up started with a short finger crack in which the best jam was partially blocked by a small, twiggy bush with white berries. Twice that winter I buried my hand in that bush as I cranked the opening moves. Twice that winter I suffered PI’s itchy wrath. At least now I know what poison ivy looks like when the leaves are gone.

Last weekend I was climbing at a remote crag in Wyoming. Nearly half of the 2.5-mile approach was infested with poison ivy. The leaves are pretty in the fall—all glowing red and yellow—and the oil that blisters your skin is said to be less prevalent in late season. But then again, I’m the guy who gets it in winter. The PI on this approach is so notorious that locals wear gaiters or rain pants, and they carry soap to scrub themselves clean when they get to the cliff. I figured I was doomed.

Fortunately, Andy Burr, Climbing’s senior contributing photographer, was also on this trip. “Tecnu,” he intoned with Graduate-like simplicity. “You get it at Walgreen’s. I keep a jug of it in the shower and scrub with it anytime I suspect poison ivy.”

After wading through those waving fields of PI on the way out from the cliff, I drove straight to the first Walgreen’s I could find, continued home to Colorado, and jumped in the shower. Now it’s four days later and despite a few suspicious bumps and itches earlier in the week, I seem to be PI-free.

Now, I can’t be certain that Tecnu made the difference. But Burr swears by the stuff, and he says he’s just as PI prone as I am. (And, as a professional climbing photographer, he’s constantly wallowing into poison ivy.) I’m a believer.

Tecnu is supposed to work best if you rub it onto dry skin that’s been in contact with poison ivy, oak, or sumac within eight hours of exposure, and then rinse it off. But it also can clean your skin of urushiol oil—the nasty stuff in rash-causing plants—after some damage has been done, minimizing the scale and duration of the rash. You can use it to clean packs, clothes, and even pets that come in contact with poison ivy, but I’d be too cautious to wash ropes, harnesses, or other life-safety gear with it.

I’ve had good results with Zanfel (zanfel.com) as well, and it might be the best stuff to use once a rash has flared up. But Zanfel costs about 40 bucks for a 1-ounce tube. I bought a 12-ounce tub of Tecnu (teclabsinc.com) for around $12.

I’ve said it before, and I’m sure I’ll say it again: “Thanks, Burr!”

Read this article: 

Gear We Love: Tecnu Poison Ivy Relief

Gear We Love: Tecnu Outdoor Skin Cleanser

Gear We Love: Tecnu Poison Ivy Relief

By Dougald MacDonald

Here’s how allergic to poison ivy I am: When I was a kid, I once caught poison ivy in the middle of winter, even though there was a foot of snow on the ground. It was so bad I had to go to the doctor to treat the oozing blisters that threatened to seal my eyes. He said, “It looks like poison ivy…but it can’t be. It’s the middle of winter.”

I still get PI frequently, even in winter. Recently, I caught it twice in one month, from the very same bush. (I’m a slow learner.) I was frequenting a good sunny crag near home, and the best warm-up started with a short finger crack in which the best jam was partially blocked by a small, twiggy bush with white berries. Twice that winter I buried my hand in that bush as I cranked the opening moves. Twice that winter I suffered PI’s itchy wrath. At least now I know what poison ivy looks like when the leaves are gone.

Last weekend I was climbing at a remote crag in Wyoming. Nearly half of the 2.5-mile approach was infested with poison ivy. The leaves are pretty in the fall—all glowing red and yellow—and the oil that blisters your skin is said to be less prevalent in late season. But then again, I’m the guy who gets it in winter. The PI on this approach is so notorious that locals wear gaiters or rain pants, and they carry soap to scrub themselves clean when they get to the cliff. I figured I was doomed.

Fortunately, Andy Burr, Climbing’s senior contributing photographer, was also on this trip. “Tecnu,” he intoned with Graduate-like simplicity. “You get it at Walgreen’s. I keep a jug of it in the shower and scrub with it anytime I suspect poison ivy.”

After wading through those waving fields of PI on the way out from the cliff, I drove straight to the first Walgreen’s I could find, continued home to Colorado, and jumped in the shower. Now it’s four days later and despite a few suspicious bumps and itches earlier in the week, I seem to be PI-free.

Now, I can’t be certain that Tecnu made the difference. But Burr swears by the stuff, and he says he’s just as PI prone as I am. (And, as a professional climbing photographer, he’s constantly wallowing into poison ivy.) I’m a believer.

Tecnu is supposed to work best if you rub it onto dry skin that’s been in contact with poison ivy, oak, or sumac within eight hours of exposure, and then rinse it off. But it also can clean your skin of urushiol oil—the nasty stuff in rash-causing plants—after some damage has been done, minimizing the scale and duration of the rash. You can use it to clean packs, clothes, and even pets that come in contact with poison ivy, but I’d be too cautious to wash ropes, harnesses, or other life-safety gear with it.

I’ve had good results with Zanfel (zanfel.com) as well, and it might be the best stuff to use once a rash has flared up. But Zanfel costs about 40 bucks for a 1-ounce tube. I bought a 12-ounce tub of Tecnu (teclabsinc.com) for around $12.

I’ve said it before, and I’m sure I’ll say it again: “Thanks, Burr!”

Visit site:

Gear We Love: Tecnu Outdoor Skin Cleanser

Adam Sandler uncovers maid's poison ivy attack

Adam Sandler was recently horrified to discover his maid had been rubbing poison ivy all over his body as he slept as payback for having to handle the actor’s dirty underwear.

The Big Daddy star had no idea how he had contracted the itchy skin rash, and so he turned to his household security camera footage to ensure he wasn’t rummaging through his yard in his sleep.

And Sandler reveals he was shocked to discover who was responsible for all his discomfort.

He tells US TV host Jay Leno, “It was a horrific event. When you get that as a kid it makes sense, but a man my age, it doesn’t make too much sense because I don’t even go… in the woods… So I thought maybe I was sleep walking or something like that…

“The security camera in my house, I put it on me in my bed to see what I do, and a housekeeper kept coming in and rubbing poison ivy all over my body while I slept and I was like, ‘What the hell is going on? Why is this lady doing that to me?’ So I wake up in the morning, I said, ‘Hey, what’s the deal? It’s itchy, what you’re doing to me is wrong. I caught you. Why (did) you do that to me? I’m very nice to you.’

“She went to the laundry hamper and pulled out my underwear and (pointed to the stains) and she said, ‘That’s why’.”

WENN.com

View original – 

Adam Sandler uncovers maid's poison ivy attack

Adam Sandler uncovers maid's poison ivy attack

Adam Sandler was recently horrified to discover his maid had been rubbing poison ivy all over his body as he slept as payback for having to handle the actor’s dirty underwear.

The Big Daddy star had no idea how he had contracted the itchy skin rash, and so he turned to his household security camera footage to ensure he wasn’t rummaging through his yard in his sleep.

And Sandler reveals he was shocked to discover who was responsible for all his discomfort.

He tells US TV host Jay Leno, “It was a horrific event. When you get that as a kid it makes sense, but a man my age, it doesn’t make too much sense because I don’t even go… in the woods… So I thought maybe I was sleep walking or something like that…

“The security camera in my house, I put it on me in my bed to see what I do, and a housekeeper kept coming in and rubbing poison ivy all over my body while I slept and I was like, ‘What the hell is going on? Why is this lady doing that to me?’ So I wake up in the morning, I said, ‘Hey, what’s the deal? It’s itchy, what you’re doing to me is wrong. I caught you. Why (did) you do that to me? I’m very nice to you.’

“She went to the laundry hamper and pulled out my underwear and (pointed to the stains) and she said, ‘That’s why’.”

WENN.com

See original article here:

Adam Sandler uncovers maid's poison ivy attack

Sandler uncovers maid's poison ivy attack

Adam Sandler was recently horrified to discover his maid had been rubbing poison ivy all over his body as he slept as payback for having to handle the actor’s dirty underwear.

The Big Daddy star had no idea how he had contracted the itchy skin rash, and so he turned to his household security camera footage to ensure he wasn’t rummaging through his yard in his sleep.

And Sandler reveals he was shocked to discover who was responsible for all his discomfort.

He tells US TV host Jay Leno, “It was a horrific event. When you get that as a kid it makes sense, but a man my age, it doesn’t make too much sense because I don’t even go… in the woods… So I thought maybe I was sleep walking or something like that…

“The security camera in my house, I put it on me in my bed to see what I do, and a housekeeper kept coming in and rubbing poison ivy all over my body while I slept and I was like, ‘What the hell is going on? Why is this lady doing that to me?’ So I wake up in the morning, I said, ‘Hey, what’s the deal? It’s itchy, what you’re doing to me is wrong. I caught you. Why (did) you do that to me? I’m very nice to you.’

“She went to the laundry hamper and pulled out my underwear and (pointed to the stains) and she said, ‘That’s why’.”

WENN.com

Original source – 

Sandler uncovers maid's poison ivy attack

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