_ap_ufes{"success":true,"siteUrl":"howtotreatpoisonivy.com","urls":{"Home":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com","Category":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/category/poison-ivy-news/","Archive":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/2015/04/","Post":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/go-ahead-little-goat-eat-some-poison-ivy-it-wont-hurt-a-bit/","Page":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/5-myths-treating-poison-ivy-rashes/","Nav_menu_item":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/96/"}}_ap_ufee

December 19, 2018

You’re gonna need an ocean of calamine lotion – poison ivy

Poison Ivy


Gloucester County Nature Logo

Have you just finished spring cleaning your garden? Forgot to wear gloves? And now you have patches of an itchy rash and tiny blisters on your hands and arms?

Hmmm. Maybe you also forgot to notice the smooth stems and tiny, shiny newly-unfolding three-parted leaves of poison ivy.

Too bad; not much you can do about it. There are over-the counter remedies that will dry up the blisters and tone down the itch. Really serious cases can be treated with steroids. Cool compresses can help.

poison ivy

But in any case, the rash will clear up in a week or two, it’s not contagious, and it won’t spread from the area of origin.

Poison ivy grows from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico and from the Atlantic Coast to Texas. It is common everywhere in New Jersey, except in the Pine Barrens, where it generally grows only on the disturbed soils around home and industrial sites.

It can grow as a ground cover about a foot high, a vine, and even as a shrub. As a vine, it gets quite large, with stems several inches in diameter that cling to the bark of a tree with hundreds of short rootlets. So if you see a big hairy-looking vine climbing a tree, that’s poison ivy.

“Leaves of three, let it be” is a wise maxim for those who want to identify the plant. The individual leaves are two to four inches long, and they grow in groups of three.

The central leaflet is usually quite symmetrical; that is, the halves of the leaf on either side of the midrib are identical. The lateral two leaflets are most often asymmetrical, wider on one side of the midrib than the other.

poison ivy

All of the leaves may have a few shallow blunt lobes. The species most commonly confused with poison ivy are Virginia creeper (which has leaflets in groups of five) and some of the low-growing blackberries (leaves have lots of small sharp teeth, and the stems are thorny or bristly.)

The flowers of poison ivy are small, green, and grow in small clusters beneath the leaves. The fruits are small white berries.

The chemical that causes the allergic reaction to poison ivy is called uroshiol, and it does not affect everybody. This substance is also present in poison oak and poison sumac, two much less common local plants.

Poison oak looks much like poison ivy, but its leaves are more deeply lobed and it grows only as a ground cover, not a vine.

Poison sumac is a small wetland tree with compound leaves, which gives it a slight resemblance to the harmless staghorn, smooth, and shining sumacs.

Those three species have flowers and fruits that form large clusters at the ends of branches but poison sumac flowers and fruit are similar to those of poison ivy.

For information about the Gloucester County Nature Club, see gcnatureclub.org/.

poison ivy

poison ivy

Poison Ivy

Poison Ivy

What Everyone Should Know About Poison Ivy Rash

Poison ivy rash – Anyone who grew up in the eastern United States or Canada will undoubtedly have several colorful stories to tell about toxicodendron radicans, otherwise known as poison ivy. This poisonous North American plant is a small and unobtrusive green leafy shrub or vine that would probably go completely unnoticed, except for its dramatic effect on humans. While some people are naturally immune, most of us will develop a painful itchy rash whenever bare skin comes into contact with this plant. This is because of a liquid compound called urushiol found in the plant’s sap.

Upon contact with urushiol, an allergic reaction forms in 70-85% of people. The first sign is severe itching and bumps. This will usually happen within a few hours after contact. As the reaction runs its course, these bumps will begin to blister and ooze. Eventually the abrasions will dry and scab over. In most cases, symptoms will clear up after 1-4 weeks, during which an itchy sensation is strong and persistent. The vast majority of cases occur from passing contact while walking in areas where the plants thrive. More severe effects can occur when the plant is burned or eaten as urushiol will bind with the interior of the mouth, throat or lungs and can lead to dangerous respiratory problems. The best way to avoid outbreaks is to avoid contact with poison ivy altogether. As the old words of wisdom state: ‘leaves of three, let it be.’

Poison Ivy Rash

| Poison Ivy Rash | Poison Ivy Rash | Poison Ivy Rash | Poison Ivy Rash | Poison Ivy Rash | Poison Ivy Rash |
poison ivy rash

Poison ivy is more prevalent now than it was in the past, mostly because of the accidental expansion of the plant’s desired habitats. The shrubs like direct sunlight, and love border areas where open spaces meet patches of woods. The edges of yards and fields, rock walls, and wooded paths are perfect habitats for poison ivy. This means that suburban North America has unwittingly become a dream habitat for this plant. These days, the plant is so common in many regions that to walk near woods without shoes and socks is an open invitation for a poison ivy rash.

Poison Ivy Rash

Most children in the eastern US and Canada learn to identify the plant at a young age. Even so, this unassuming plant can be hard to spot amidst the undergrowth. It is characterized by groups of three leaflets that are green turning to red in the fall. The surface of the leaves are slightly shiny and can have serrated edges or not depending on the sub-species. This plant can grow as a shrub up to a foot high, or as a creeping vine on tree trunks and rocks.

The active itching agent present in the plant will remain active long after the plant has died or is no longer present. This means that even touching dead and dried leaves and stems is likely to lead to a reaction. What’s more, sap can easily become attached to animal fur, tools, or clothing. Special precautions should be taken to wash clothes, animals, and so on that may have come into contact with poison ivy.

poison ivy rash

In most cases, allergic reaction is annoying but not overly dangerous. Left alone, the effects will go away by themselves. It it always best not to scratch a poison ivy rash if possible to avoid damaging the skin and causing healing to take longer. Contrary to popular belief, a poison ivy rash is not transferable by contact with oozing skin. The liquid that seeps from cracked blisters is created by the body and is not urushiol. If oozing is especially problematic, it can be reduced by cooling the affected area.

While there is no way to eliminate a poison ivy rash after contact, there are ways to reduce discomfort. On of the most popular is to apply calamine lotion to the area. This reduces itching and helps to dry the area. Another popular cure is to apply common under-arm deodorant. This has a similar effect to calamine, drying and cooling the area.

Jewel weed is an effective herbal cure that has been scientifically proven to reduce itching and eliminate the effects of a poison ivy rash more quickly. For this remedy, a 1:4 compound of jewel weed is applied to the affected area frequently. This can shorten the full course of the allergic reaction by several days or even weeks. While most people will find exposure to poison ivy annoying and uncomfortable, it will only be dangerous in extreme cases. Certain individuals will have stronger reactions and will need to be especially careful to avoid contact.

Although annoying, this eastern pest is not likely to go away any time soon. Instead, it will most likely continue to flourish as eastern North America continues to undergo subdivision. The best way to avoid contracting a poison ivy rash is to learn how to correctly identify the plant and avoid contact. It is also wise to avoid walking though forest undergrowth with unprotected feet, and to be especially vigilant in border areas around yards and fields.

poison ivy rash

Poison Ivy Rash | Poison Ivy Rash | Poison Ivy Rash | Poison Ivy Rash | Poison Ivy Rash | Poison Ivy Rash | Poison Ivy Rash |

Poison Ivy Rash

Poison Ivy Rash

Wordpress SEO Plugin by SEOPressor