_ap_ufes{"success":true,"siteUrl":"howtotreatpoisonivy.com","urls":{"Home":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com","Category":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/category/poison-ivy-news/","Archive":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/2015/04/","Post":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/go-ahead-little-goat-eat-some-poison-ivy-it-wont-hurt-a-bit/","Page":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/5-myths-treating-poison-ivy-rashes/","Nav_menu_item":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/96/"}}_ap_ufee

August 21, 2018

Sanam Saeed, Ayesha Toor and Meesha Shafi share their recipes for homemade skin scrubs that they love to use

Your skin is the largest organ of your body. Everything affects it: what you eat/drink, put inside your body, what you put on top of your body and the kind of emotional stress you take on.

Therefore it is important to take care of it. Often, it isn’t enough to simply shower and wash away dirt from your skin. You may have clogged pores, be facing the effects of sun burn, acne and more … all of which need more serious attention.

You can provide that attention by doing a little extra in your skin-care regimen. It’s important to scrub not only the skin on your face but also the rest of the skin on your body to keep it in shape.

Instead of stocking up on over-the-counter cosmetic products that often contain chemicals that aren’t good for your skin (or your wallet for that matter) we decided to ask three beautiful and hard-working women from Pakistan’s entertainment industry what their recipes and key ingredient is for their favourite do-it-yourself homemade scrubs and this is what we got.

Sanam Saeed: Porridge

Sanam Saeed

Sanam Saeed

Theatre and television actor and model Sanam Saeed’s homemade scrubs are as simple as the actor is in person. One is to take ground whole-grain porridge (oats are a great option) — the slow-cooking one not the instant one — and mix with some water.

Apply the mixture to your face and scrub. Other than the fact that they’re packed with nutrients which are good for your health, oats contain natural cleansers that remove dirt and oil from pores without causing irritation. This makes them very effective in fighting dull, flaky skin and dryness as they contain polysaccharides that have a gelatinous quality when mixed with water.


Sanam Saeed, Ayesha Toor and Meesha Shafi share their recipes for homemade skin scrubs that they love to use


Oats have also been used for thousands of years for the treatment of poison ivy, eczema, insect bites and skin infections. They have numerous anti-inflammatory and antioxidant qualities.

“It’s the best pore-tightener and the gentlest scrub ever,” said the actor, “The other is basin ka atta, haldi and lemon for summer and add yogurt in it for use in winter.”

Ayesha Toor: Salt

“The best one I’ve used at home is a mixture of sea salt, honey, olive oil and baking soda,” said the dusky beauty.

Ayesha Toor.— Photo Courtesy: fashioncentral.pk

Ayesha Toor.— Photo Courtesy: fashioncentral.pk

Sea salt is natural salt left behind after water from the ocean is evaporated. It isn’t processed like iodized salt and therefore contains a lot of vital nutrients that nourish your skin. It contains a large amount of vitamin C and magnesium which makes the function of antioxidants smoother — therefore it detoxifies your skin cells by absorbing dirt, dust and toxins from them resulting in a softer and healthier skin.

Honey helps moisturize skin, fights ageing and bacteria. It’s full of antioxidants and nutrients for your skin and protects your skin from sun damage as well.

Olive oil has been used as a product in beauty treatment since its discovery 5,000 years ago. It’s loaded with nutrients and is closer in chemical structure to the skin’s natural oil. That is why it’s a great moisturizer for dry skin and areas prone to dryness such as the knees and elbows.

Perhaps the best quality of olive oil is its skin-regenerative ability. Regular usage makes your skin remain firm and toned while also being soft and smooth.

“Sea salt gets rid of dead skin. Honey kills bacteria. Olive oil softens the skin. Lemon gets rid of the bad Karachi sunburn and discoloration. Finally, baking soda gives a glow,” said Ayesha Toor of the benefits of the scrub. “Follow it up with a good mustard oil massage and you’ll end up with gold, honey skin.”

Meesha Shafi: Coffee

“When you have an hour of ‘me’ time on your hands, try out my do-it-yourself spa treat,” wrote Meesha Shafi while sharing her favourite routine to pamper herself with.

Meesha Shafi.— Photo Courtesy: koolmuzone.pk

Meesha Shafi.— Photo Courtesy: koolmuzone.pk

You start off with dry brushing your entire body in long, sweeping strokes towards your heart for not more than 10 minutes. Dry brushing is when you take a brush with a long handle with non-synthetic bristles and brush your body starting from your feet.

You must always brush towards your heart. It helps to stand on a tiled surface or inside a bathtub to catch the falling skin. Dry brushing helps unclog pores and excretes toxins that become trapped in the skin.

Coffee beans.—Photo Courtesy: Friendlycuponlie

Coffee beans.—Photo Courtesy: Friendlycuponlie

Step two is to soak in a tub of hot water with two cups of Epsom salts for 20 minutes. Other than its detoxifying properties, Epsom salts are known for their healing properties: helps relieve pain and muscle cramps, prevents the hardening of arteries, etc. It is also used in the removal of splinters as soaking in Epsom saltwater brings the splinter (and ingrown hair) closer to the surface.

Then take a handful of coffee grounds, moisten them with coconut oil (organic, unfiltered and cold-pressed) and scrub the mixture on your body. Coffee contains powerful anti-oxidant agents which protects skin from free radicals and reduces the risk of skin cancer.

It also removes dead skin cells and tightens pores, resulting in a younger looking skin. Needless to say, it also has anti-wrinkle properties. Coconut oil is used as a base in many skin products and is full of vital nutrients for your skin and hair.

After you’re done scrubbing your body, rinse it and finish off with an application of the same coconut oil (without the coffee) while the body is still damp.

“This routine is great for exfoliation, circulation and skin toning,” related Meesha, “It tackles cellulite and leaves you with skin that is smooth as silk and smells like freshly-baked cookies. What more do you want?”

Published in Dawn, Sunday Magazine, January 25th, 2015

On a mobile phone? Get the Dawn Mobile App: Apple Store | Google Play

Jump to original:  

Sanam Saeed, Ayesha Toor and Meesha Shafi share their recipes for homemade skin scrubs that they love to use

Personal Health: Steering Clear of Poison Ivy

Alexa Grace
Personal Health
Personal Health

Jane Brody on health and aging.

I was once among those who claim, “I could walk through a field of poison ivy and not get it.” One day I learned otherwise: On a hike, I needed to relieve myself in the great outdoors and ended up with an impossibly itchy, blistering rash on a most delicate body part.

Too late I learned that you can develop an allergic reaction to poison ivy after previously uneventful exposures, which induce a sensitivity to the plant’s oily sap, urushiol. Once sensitized, your skin is likely to react to every subsequent exposure. Even people repeatedly exposed who appear to be immune may react to high concentrations of the toxin.

I also learned not to rely on the popular warning, “Leaves of three, let them be,” to alert me to the presence of Toxicodendron radicans, as the poison ivy plant is aptly called by botanists. It is not just the leaves that can provoke a reaction; the stems, roots, flowers and berries all contain urushiol.

Touching or brushing against any of these plant parts, even if they are dead, can cause a reaction. The sap is hardy and can cause a rash in the dead of winter, or even a year after contaminating clothing or shoes that are not thoroughly cleaned.

Poison oak.iStockPoison oak.
Poison sumac.Zoran Ivanovich/The New York TimesPoison sumac.
Poison ivy.iStockPoison ivy.

Urushiol shows up elsewhere, including in the skin of mangoes (and the leaves and bark of the mango tree), as I discovered when I ate a mango still in the rind and ended up with a blistering rash on my mouth. Cashew shells also have the toxin, which is why cashews are sold shelled and processed (either roasted or in the case of “raw” cashews, steamed) at a temperature high enough to destroy urushiol. Poison ivy is not the only problem plant one might encounter while hiking, camping or simply strolling in the countryside. T. radicans has two relatives, poison oak and poison sumac, that don’t always form the classic clusters but are equally toxic troublemakers.

Myths and misconceptions abound about these three plants and the reactions they can cause. Knowing the facts can help to spare you and your family considerable distress.

First, learn to recognize the plants in their various growth patterns. While poison ivy is most often encountered as a small ground plant, it also grows as a shrub and vine. The vines, which turn bright red in fall, were once used to adorn buildings in England.

Poison oak, which has compound leaves made up of three (or sometimes five) leaflets, usually grows as a shrub, but will form a vine in the Western states.

Poison sumac, which grows as a tall shrub or small tree, produces leaves with rows of paired leaflets and a single leaflet at the end. It likes a wet habitat, growing in peat bogs in the Northeast and Midwest and swamps in the Southeast.

Urushiol can penetrate cloth. Although long sleeves, pants and gloves can reduce the risk of exposure, they cannot guarantee protection. Even rubber gloves can be breached. If you must handle the plants or are likely to contact poison ivy when gardening, wear vinyl gloves.

You don’t have to touch the plant directly to react to urushiol. Gardening tools, sporting equipment, even a pet that has been in a patch of poison ivy — all can cause a reaction. My brother, who has been sensitive to urushiol since childhood, once developed the rash on his arm after retrieving a baseball that had rolled through poison ivy.

Before possible exposure, use an over-the-counter skin-care product containing bentoquatam (IvyBlock) to prevent or reduce absorption of urushiol. The combination of this barrier product and protective clothing is your best defense against an inadvertent encounter.

But there is no scientific evidence that jewelweed, feverfew, plantain or other herbal remedies prevent or cure a urushiol-induced rash.

Nor do you become immune to urushiol through repeated exposures to small amounts. Quite the opposite. There is no way to desensitize a person to urushiol as there is with pollen and peanut allergies. Eating mangoes or cashews will not work.

Contrary to popular belief, a poison ivy rash is not contagious. It cannot be spread by oozing blisters, or by scratching or touching the rash. Only direct contact with urushiol causes a reaction. (Scratching can result in an infection, however.)

The rash can appear on different parts of the body at various times. This may happen because the parts were exposed at different times, or because areas with thicker skin are less easily penetrated by the oil. The delicate skin of the genital and perianal areas, for example, is more easily breached than tougher skin on the hands.

Repeated tilling or mowing can eventually kill poison ivy plants, as can repeated applications of an herbicide like Roundup. The latter should be applied with serious caution and only on a warm, sunny day with little or no wind when the plants are actively growing.

If you are highly allergic, or wary of applying herbicides, clearing your property of the plants may be best left to a professional. While goats are said to have a hearty appetite for poison ivy plants, they may eat everything else in the yard, too.

Never try to burn a poison plant. Burning releases the toxin, which may land on skin or, worse, be inhaled and cause a serious internal reaction.

Should you contact a urushiol-containing plant, the American Academy of Dermatology recommends washing your skin immediately. Lukewarm, soapy water is best, but even plain water can limit exposure to the sap. Take care in removing contaminated clothing, and wash it separately as soon as possible.

You can relieve a rash by applying cool compresses with an astringent like Burow’s solution, soaking the affected area in colloidal oatmeal, or using calamine lotion; all are sold over the counter. Do not apply products containing a topical antihistamine, like Benadryl, which can cause a sensitivity reaction that makes matters worse.

Severe reactions may require medically prescribed treatment with an oral corticosteroid like prednisone.

A version of this article appears in print on 06/17/2014, on page D7 of the NewYork edition with the headline: Steering Clear of Poison Ivy.

View post:  

Personal Health: Steering Clear of Poison Ivy

Outdoor Summer Activities Prompt Peak in Visits to Urgent Care

MORGANTOWN, W.Va.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

With the “unofficial” start of summer upon us, urgent care centers anticipate peaks in ailments related to warm weather and traditional summer outdoor activities. MedExpress, an urgent care provider serving over two million patients a year at 129 centers in nine states, traditionally sees peaks in summer ailments across a wide range of categories including sunburns, accidents, dehydration, heat stroke and exhaustion, bee stings, poison ivy and bug bites.

“It’s no surprise that summer and warm weather bring an increase in accidents and outdoor-related illnesses and injuries,” said Thomas Pangburn, M.D., MedExpress. “We see predictable upticks this time of year in everything from sunburn and bug bites to injuries caused by outdoor activities or home improvement projects. In 2013, from March to July alone, we saw an 85% increase in the number of insect and allergic-related visits.”

Many summer ailments can be easily avoided by following a few summer safety tips, however if unsure about the severity of an issue, always consult a health care professional to discern the best treatment option. Urgent care centers often offer extended weekday and weekend hours to assist with unexpected summer ailments.

Burns
Avoid the sun between the hours of 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. when the sun is at its strongest. Remember to wear light, breathable fabric and apply at least a 30 SPF sunscreen, even on overcast days.

Heat Exhaustion
Heat exhaustion occurs when the body is unable to efficiently cool itself to maintain a normal body temperature. Dehydration, alcohol use and overdressing also prevent the body from cooling itself correctly. Heat cramps, indicated by heavy sweating, fatigue thirst and muscle cramps, are the first stage of heat exhaustion. Rest in a cooler location, drink cool fluids, apply cool water to the skin and rest with legs elevated above heart level.

Bites and Stings
The symptoms of insect bites and stings vary depending on the severity of the body’s reaction to the insect’s venom. Most mild bites and stings can be treated by applying a cold pack or hydrocortisone cream. Refrain from scratching, which can lead to infection.

Community-based urgent care centers are staffed by licensed physicians and full medical support teams to help patients find relief. With no appointments necessary and most insurance accepted, each facility can treat injuries and illnesses, including broken bones, cuts, burns, colds and flu. They can also handle lab work, minor surgeries, X-Rays and offer access to most common forms of prescription medications.

About MedExpress
MedExpress is a national leader in delivering high-quality, convenient and affordable walk-in care for those seeking medical treatment for illness and injury, as well as preventative care and wellness services. MedExpress also offers treatment for workplace injury and job-related medical issues to employers and their employees. MedExpress operates full-service, walk-in health care facilities that are open 12 hours per day, seven days a week, and always have a fully staffed medical team on site. MedExpress currently operates centers in nine states and employs more than 3,000 people. MedExpress has administrative offices in Morgantown, W.Va., and Canonsburg, Pa. For more information, visit http://www.medexpress.com.

Contact:

MedExpress

Annie Jamieson, 724-597-6059


anne.jamieson@medexpress.com

See the original article here:

Outdoor Summer Activities Prompt Peak in Visits to Urgent Care

Treating Poison Ivy: Ease the Itch With Tips From Dermatologists

SCHAUMBURG, IL–(Marketwired – Apr 8, 2014) – As summer approaches and the landscape turns greener, so too are the leaves from poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac. When the oil from these plants touches the skin, most people (about 85 percent) develop an itchy, blistering rash. Although the rash itself is not contagious, the oil can spread to other areas of the body and from person to person if not quickly washed off after touching the plants. Fortunately, there are simple steps people can take to safely treat the rash at home.

“If you are absolutely certain that your rash is due to poison ivy, poison oak, or poison sumac, and if the rash appears on a small section of your skin, you may be able to treat the rash at home,” said board-certified dermatologist Seemal R. Desai, MD, FAAD, who maintains a private practice in Plano, Texas and serves as clinical assistant professor of dermatology at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. “However, if you have difficulty breathing or swallowing, you experience swelling, or you have many rashes or blisters, go to the emergency room right away.”

If you are not experiencing a serious reaction, Dr. Desai recommends the following tips for treating the rash and easing the itch:

1. Immediately rinse your skin with lukewarm, soapy water. If you can rinse your skin immediately after touching poison ivy, poison oak, or poison sumac, you may be able to rinse off some of the oil. This helps ensure that the oil does not spread to other areas of the body and cause additional rashes.
2. Wash your clothing. Thoroughly wash all of the clothes you were wearing when you came into contact with the poisonous plant. The oil can stick to clothing, and if it touches your skin, it can cause another rash.
3. Wash everything that may have the oil on its surface. Besides clothing, the oil from poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac can stick to many surfaces, including gardening tools, golf clubs, leashes and even a pet’s fur. Be sure to rinse your pet’s fur, and wash tools and other objects with warm, soapy water.
4. Do not scratch, as scratching can cause an infection.
5. Leave blisters alone. If blisters open, do not remove the overlying skin, as the skin can protect the raw wound underneath and prevent infection.
6. Take short, lukewarm baths. To ease the itch, take short, lukewarm baths in a colloidal oatmeal preparation, which you can buy at your local drugstore. You can also draw a bath and add one cup of baking soda to the running water. Taking short, cool showers may also help.
7. Consider calamine lotion or hydrocortisone cream. Apply calamine lotion to skin that itches. If you have a mild case, a hydrocortisone cream or lotion may also help.
8. Apply cool compresses to the itchy skin. You can make a cool compress by wetting a clean washcloth with cold water and wringing it out so that it does not drip. Then, apply the cool cloth to the itchy skin.
9. Consider taking antihistamine pills. These pills can help reduce itching, however use with caution. You should not apply a topical antihistamine to your skin, as doing so can worsen the rash and the itch.

“A rash from poison ivy, oak or sumac usually lasts one to three weeks,” said Dr. Desai. “If your rash is not improving after seven to 10 days, or you think your rash may be infected, see a board-certified dermatologist for treatment.”

The “Poison Ivy: How to Treat” video is posted to the American Academy of Dermatology’s (Academy) website and the Academy’s YouTube channel. This video is part of the Dermatology A to Z: Video Series, which offers relatable videos that demonstrate tips people can use to properly care for their skin, hair and nails. A new video in the series posts to the Academy’s website and YouTube channel each month.

Headquartered in Schaumburg, Ill., the American Academy of Dermatology (Academy), founded in 1938, is the largest, most influential, and most representative of all dermatologic associations. With a membership of more than 17,000 physicians worldwide, the Academy is committed to: advancing the diagnosis and medical, surgical and cosmetic treatment of the skin, hair and nails; advocating high standards in clinical practice, education, and research in dermatology; and supporting and enhancing patient care for a lifetime of healthier skin, hair and nails. For more information, contact the Academy at 1-888-462-DERM (3376) or www.aad.org. Follow the Academy on Facebook (American Academy of Dermatology) or Twitter (@AADskin).

To view this release in a media-rich version, go to: http://www.pwrnewmedia.com/2014/aad/poison_ivy/

Contact:

Jennifer Allyn

(847) 240-1730


Email Contact

Nicole DiVito
(847) 240-1746
Email Contact

Kara Jilek
(847) 240-1701
Email Contact

Original source:  

Treating Poison Ivy: Ease the Itch With Tips From Dermatologists

Shingles Remain Lifelong Threat

Published: Monday, March 10, 2014 at 8:32 p.m.
Last Modified: Tuesday, March 11, 2014 at 5:14 p.m.

If you had chickenpox (varicella zoster) as a youngster, you probably remember it well.

The itching.

The scratching.

The perpetual discomfort bordering on pain.

What you probably don’t remember, however, is being told by your parents and/or doctor that five, six or seven decades later the virus may just revisit you — in the form of shingles (herpes zoster).

Former MSNBC and current ESPN broadcaster Keith Olbermann is the latest baby boomer to be reminded — the hard way — that once the dreaded “zoster” comes to visit, it never leaves.

Late last month, the 55-year-old Olbermann missed a week of broadcasting of his eponymous nightly one-hour show after being felled by the burning, painful disorder.

His tweets — self-admitted “kvetches” — about the condition, though, were quite entertaining. Among them:

“It is mind-boggling to realize that I am dealing with a virus I contracted while JFK was still president”

“To those asking, Shingles (sic) feels like you fell 3 flights. On to sharp poison ivy. Which then spontaneously combusts. Emitting toxic fumes.”

“…Get the vaccine!”

Of course, for anyone who’s suffered through a bout with shingles, they’re no laughing matter.

What’s more, a study of Medicare data published in December showed that, between 1992 and 2010, the annual rates of shingles cases in those older than 65 increased nearly 40 percent.

That same study concluded that, for those who had chickenpox in their youth, between a quarter and a third eventually experience at least one episode with shingles.

The reason why? Well, the medical community’s guess is as good as yours or mine.

“Anything that is a ‘stress’ on the body could be a factor that contributes to a shingles outbreak,” explains Dr. Thomas Balshi, owner and medical director of Balshi Dermatology and Cosmetic Surgery in Delray Beach. “Everything from the flu, arthritic injury and mental stress to too much sunlight or a sudden change in climate can do it. The list is endless. And, sometimes shingles erupts without any definable reason behind it.”

The vaccine Olbermann referenced in his tweet — it’s called “Zostavax” — is available to those 50 and older who’ve had chickenpox. The injection helps mitigate some of the risk for seniors — but, says Balshi, it “doesn’t provide 100 percent protection from getting shingles.”

Nonetheless, adds Balshi: “Experts recommend that people older than 60 get this vaccine — whether or not they’ve had shingles before — because it considerably reduces the severity and risk of further complications of a shingles outbreak.”

At the first sign of shingles — that is, when you begin experiencing nerve pain, burning or topical blistering — get to your doctor immediately.

“By taking antiviral prescription medication within 72 hours of an outbreak, you can help reduce the pain and duration of the disease,” says Boca Raton family physician Dr. Carlos Ballestas.

In severe cases, notes Ballestas, patients may need to supplement the antiviral meds with corticosteroids (to reduce swelling), antihistamines (to decrease itching) and Zostrix, a cream containing capsacian, which helps control pain.

In addition, Ballestas warns that just because you’ve never had chickenpox does not mean shingles pose you no threat.

“Exposure to shingles may cause chickenpox in adults or children who’ve never had chickenpox,” he explains.

See original article here: 

Shingles Remain Lifelong Threat

Dangers of burning poison ivy

The chill in the air makes this time of year prime time bonfire season, and here in Sportsman’s Paradise: hunting season. But before you clear out the brush from your hunting camp or light any brush on fire, pay special attention to this warning on what you burn.

When Todd Taylor and his wife, Ashley, moved into a new home in Moss Bluff – the first step was to clear out some of the old brush. “We started raking up pine straw and we threw the pine straw onto the pile. We started trimming trees,” he said.

Then the pile was set on fire. Todd kept an eye on it, inadvertently breathing in the smoke.

The next day, Todd’s eyelids turned blood red. Then his health took a nose dive. “I start throwing up, I have chills, I’m running fever,” he said.

Todd thought it might be a temporary virus, until his skin broke out. All over his body, painful, itchy rashes started popping up. “I’ve had some blisters in my eyebrows, irritation on my neck, all over my arms,” he said.

Those symptoms were not new to this country boy that can recognize a reaction to poison ivy. “I know this is poison ivy. I’ve been down this road before, but my eyes were still kind of reddish,” he said.

Todd decided to go to see a doctor. The diagnosis: systemic poison ivy. Imperial Health Ear, Nose and Throat Specialist Bridget Loehn explains, “Systemic poison ivy is an extreme allergic reaction to the oils from the poison ivy plant.”

It was not physically touching the poison ivy plant that sickened Todd. It was breathing in the oils of the plant as it burned, traveling from the lungs to the blood stream.

Fortunately, Todd’s case cleared up with steroids, allergy medicine and antihistamines. But Dr. Loehn says the symptoms can be life-threatening. “Symptoms of nausea, vomiting, fever, they can have swollen lymph nodes and even develop respiratory difficulties.”

If you do not spend a lot of time in the woods, you may not know how to recognize poison ivy. Here is an easy way to remember: leaves of three, let it be. Vines with hair, beware!

“It’s just a good reminder to go look up pictures and be familiar with what poison ivy, poison oak, poison sumac looks like,” said Todd, “because it is very indigenous to the area.”

It is also important to note that even if you have burned poison ivy before and had no health problems, your neighbors could be affected by inhaling the burning plant’s oils.

Copyright KPLC 2013. All rights reserved.

Link:  

Dangers of burning poison ivy

Pointers for preventing, treating poison ivy

KANSAS CITY, Kan. — Itching to know more about poison ivy? It’s the most common allergy with two out of three people being allergic to it.

For most of us, the rash occurs after we’ve been exposed to poison ivy at least once before in our lives.

Bruce Chladny of K-State Extension in Wyandotte County reminds us that the old adage, “Leaves of three, let it be,” definitely holds true.

“Not to confuse it with the five leaves of Virginia creeper. When you look at the plant, there’s three leaflets and that means it’s not good to touch,” says Chladny.

The rash ia an allergic reaction to the oil in the plant.

“So when the oil comes from the plant onto your skin, it gets into your skin and your body has that allergic reaction. It could either be through exposure as you walk through the garden…could be from touching a tool or some sort of machinery or something like that that had been in an infested areas.  Or off of pets,” says Chladny.

If you think you’ve been exposed to poison ivy, use soap and cold water quickly to remove the oil from the skin. Chladny says it’s important to use cold water because it keeps the pores of the skin closed.

You can’t get poison ivy from another person’s blister fluid. But Chladny says if there’s residual oil on someone’s skin and you touch that, you could get a rash.

To show you how powerful the oil is, five hundred people could itch just from the oil covering the head of a pin.

So how do you treat poison ivy? An over-the counter corticosteroid cream, calamine lotion, a cool bath with oatmeal or cool wet compresses. You may also want to try an antihistimine such as Benedryl to help you sleep.

See your doctor if the rash is widespread or on your face, if the blisters are oozing badly, or if the rash isn’t better after a few weeks.

See original article:

Pointers for preventing, treating poison ivy

Adam Sandler uncovers maid's poison ivy attack

Adam Sandler was recently horrified to discover his maid had been rubbing poison ivy all over his body as he slept as payback for having to handle the actor’s dirty underwear.

The Big Daddy star had no idea how he had contracted the itchy skin rash, and so he turned to his household security camera footage to ensure he wasn’t rummaging through his yard in his sleep.

And Sandler reveals he was shocked to discover who was responsible for all his discomfort.

He tells US TV host Jay Leno, “It was a horrific event. When you get that as a kid it makes sense, but a man my age, it doesn’t make too much sense because I don’t even go… in the woods… So I thought maybe I was sleep walking or something like that…

“The security camera in my house, I put it on me in my bed to see what I do, and a housekeeper kept coming in and rubbing poison ivy all over my body while I slept and I was like, ‘What the hell is going on? Why is this lady doing that to me?’ So I wake up in the morning, I said, ‘Hey, what’s the deal? It’s itchy, what you’re doing to me is wrong. I caught you. Why (did) you do that to me? I’m very nice to you.’

“She went to the laundry hamper and pulled out my underwear and (pointed to the stains) and she said, ‘That’s why’.”

WENN.com

See original article here:

Adam Sandler uncovers maid's poison ivy attack

Adam Sandler uncovers maid's poison ivy attack

Adam Sandler was recently horrified to discover his maid had been rubbing poison ivy all over his body as he slept as payback for having to handle the actor’s dirty underwear.

The Big Daddy star had no idea how he had contracted the itchy skin rash, and so he turned to his household security camera footage to ensure he wasn’t rummaging through his yard in his sleep.

And Sandler reveals he was shocked to discover who was responsible for all his discomfort.

He tells US TV host Jay Leno, “It was a horrific event. When you get that as a kid it makes sense, but a man my age, it doesn’t make too much sense because I don’t even go… in the woods… So I thought maybe I was sleep walking or something like that…

“The security camera in my house, I put it on me in my bed to see what I do, and a housekeeper kept coming in and rubbing poison ivy all over my body while I slept and I was like, ‘What the hell is going on? Why is this lady doing that to me?’ So I wake up in the morning, I said, ‘Hey, what’s the deal? It’s itchy, what you’re doing to me is wrong. I caught you. Why (did) you do that to me? I’m very nice to you.’

“She went to the laundry hamper and pulled out my underwear and (pointed to the stains) and she said, ‘That’s why’.”

WENN.com

View original – 

Adam Sandler uncovers maid's poison ivy attack

Adam Sandler says maid rubbed poison ivy on him as he slept

Washington, May 18 (ANI): Adam Sandler has told of his horror when he discovered that his maid had been rubbing poison ivy on him, to get back at him for having to deal with his soiled underwear.

The 46-year-old comedian apparently had no clue how he had contracted the itchy skin rash, so he turned to his household security camera footage to ensure that he wasn’t sleep walking, Contactmusic reported.

The ‘Big Daddy’ star claimed that he was horrified to discover the reason behind his discomfort.

Sandler told US TV host Jay Leno that it was a horrific event because when you get the rash as a kid it makes sense, but for a man his age, it doesn’t.

The actor asserted that he doesn’t go out in the woods, so he thought maybe he was walking in his sleep.

Sandler said that he put the security camera on himself in his bed to see what he was doing but instead discovered that a housekeeper kept coming in and rubbing poison ivy all over his body while he slept.

He added that when he confronted the maid, she went to the laundry hamper, pulled out his underwear, pointed to the stains and said, ‘That’s why’. (ANI)

Original post:  

Adam Sandler says maid rubbed poison ivy on him as he slept

Wordpress SEO Plugin by SEOPressor