_ap_ufes{"success":true,"siteUrl":"howtotreatpoisonivy.com","urls":{"Home":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com","Category":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/category/poison-ivy-news/","Archive":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/2015/04/","Post":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/go-ahead-little-goat-eat-some-poison-ivy-it-wont-hurt-a-bit/","Page":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/5-myths-treating-poison-ivy-rashes/","Nav_menu_item":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/96/"}}_ap_ufee

January 18, 2018

Wildlife: Mast is a critical wildlife food

Last week a caller to my radio show (8-10 a.m. Saturdays on WVLY-AM 1370 Wheeling, online at www.wvly.net) asked that I explain the term “mast.” It’s a great question, especially this time of year.

Fruits and nuts of trees and shrubs are collectively referred to as mast. Fleshy fruits and berries are soft mast; nuts are hard mast.

Crab apples, grapes, cherries and even poison ivy berries are sought by a variety of birds including turkeys, grouse and woodpeckers. Sweet, fleshy persimmons began ripening about two weeks ago. Birds take them on the tree while coyotes, foxes, raccoons, skunks and opossums gobble up those that fall to the ground.

The flat football-shaped seeds that pass through these mammals’ guts are recognizable in their scats. Hard mast including acorns, walnuts, hickory nuts, and beechnuts trigger a competitive feeding frenzy among squirrels, chipmunks, deer, bears, turkeys, mice, jays, woodpeckers and nuthatches.

Acorns, the fruits of oak trees, are the most important mast in Eastern deciduous forests. Where oaks are common, wildlife usually thrives.

Here on the ridge, we’ve had a bumper crop of black walnuts. For weeks my wife and I have been collecting walnuts and crushing them with the car to remove husks.

On cold winter nights we’ll crack the nuts and save the meat for snacks and baking.

To share the wealth, I offer a few walnuts and hickory nuts on a tray for the birds.

Scott Shalaway: www.drshalaway.com, sshalaway@aol.com.

See the article here:  

Wildlife: Mast is a critical wildlife food

Angie's List Report: Identifying Poison Ivy, Oak and Sumac

(WDEF) Homeowner Shirley Branham loves tending to her yard and garden, but she can’t seem to escape the itchy wrath of poison ivy.

She said, “I usually just noticed one or two little dots which eventually unfortunately then spread all the way up my arm or on my legs.”

The key to avoiding a rash like Shirley’s is knowing how to spot these poisonous plants.

Poison ivy grows in all areas of the continental U-S.

Poison oak is most common on the West Coast, but it’s also found in Southeastern states.

And poison sumac grows in swampy areas of the Southeast.

Emily Wood works as a horticulturist. She said, “Poison oak and poison ivy look fairly similar, but poison sumac has much more leaflets, more leaves on the leaflet.”

Birds often feed on the berries of these plants and consequently spread the seeds, so look for the plants in areas where birds hang out – on or under trees or near fences.

Angie’s List researchers found many lawn care companies won’t go near these plants, but there are some that do specialize in removal.

Angie Hicks of Angie’s List said, “During the hiring process be sure to cover how the company is going to tackle the problem. Are they going to use chemicals to remove the plants? Are they going to dig the plants up? How long do they guarantee their work? Will they come back if the plant reappears? Also, don’t forget these plants like to spread so if the plant is in your neighbor’s yard you want to understand that problem as well.”

You may be able to tackle smaller plants on your own, but be sure to wear protective clothing and know how to properly dispose.

Wood added, “Most of the time it’s probably best to put it in a plastic bag and throw it away, but keep in mind, that anything that touches it will carry the oil and you can get the contact dermatitis from the oil.”

You should never burn these plants or use a weed eater or lawn mower to get rid of them – you’ll just distribute the oil.

Excerpt from: 

Angie's List Report: Identifying Poison Ivy, Oak and Sumac

Angie's List: Removing Poison Ivy, Sumac or Oak Plants

A weekend spent working in the yard can turn into an itchy, uncomfortable nightmare — if you don’t steer clear of poisonous plants.

Homeowner Shirley Branham loves tending to her yard and garden. But she can’t seem to escape the itchy wrath of poison ivy. Every summer for the past ten years — she’s suffered through a horrible rash.

“I usually just noticed one or two little dots which eventually unfortunately then spread all the way up my arm or on my legs,” says Branham)

The key to avoiding a rash like Shirley’s — knowing how to spot these poisonous plants. Poison ivy grows in all areas of the continental US.

Poison oak is most common on the West Coast, but it’s also found in southeastern states. And poison sumac grows in swampy areas of the Southeast.

Horticulturist Emily Wood says, “Poison oak and poison ivy look fairly similar, but poison sumac has much more leaflets, more leaves on the leaflet.”

Birds often feed on the berries of these plants and consequently spread the seeds. So look for the plants in areas where birds hang out — on or under trees or near fences. The plants can grow to great lengths — so you may need help to get rid of them. Angie’s List researchers found many lawn care companies won’t go near these plants, but there are some that do specialize in removal.

Angie Hicks, from Angie’s List, says “During the hiring process be sure to cover how the company is going to tackle the problem. Are they going to use chemicals to remove the plants? Are they going to dig the plants up? How long do they guarantee their work? Will they come back if the plant reappears? Also, don’t forget these plants like to spread so if the plant is in your neighbor’s yard you want to understand that problem as well.”

You may be able to tackle smaller plants on your own, but be sure to wear protective clothing and know how to properly dispose.

“Most of the time it’s probably best to put it in a plastic bag and throw it away, but keep in mind, that anything that touches it will carry the oil and you can get the contact dermatitis from the oil,” says Wood.

All parts of these plants produce urushiol — the oil that causes the rash. It can stay on clothing and garden tools for up to five years. You should never burn these plants or use a weed eater or lawnmower to get rid of them — you’ll just distribute the oil.

See the original article here: 

Angie's List: Removing Poison Ivy, Sumac or Oak Plants

Common Myths About Poison Oak, Poison Ivy and Poison Sumac: WSSA Experts Separate Fact From Fiction

Lawrence, Kansas (PRWEB) July 02, 2014

With summer temperatures luring us outdoors, scientists with the Weed Science Society of America (WSSA) say it’s a great time for refresher course on poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac. All three thrive during summer months and are known to trigger highly irritating skin rashes that can last for many days.

“When you look at the thousands of people exposed each year and at the misery a rash can produce, poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac certainly rank among the most notorious weeds in the nation,” says Lee Van Wychen, Ph.D., WSSA science policy director.

All three belong to the Toxicodendron genus and produce irritating urushiol oils. When urushiol comes in contact with the skin of sensitive individuals, itching and watery blisters will follow.

Poison oak and poison ivy in particular are common fixtures in many outdoor landscapes, often tucked among other native vegetation and growing as either a low shrub or trailing vine. Both produce small, whitish green flowers in the spring, followed by small berries in the summer. Birds enjoy the seeds and help to spread the weeds into new areas.

Poison sumac is rarer, and tends to be found primarily in wetlands. This characteristic is one of several differences among the three weed species and where they are found.

Poison oak grows as a low shrub in eastern and southern states and in tall clumps or long vines on the Pacific Coast. Fuzzy green leaves grow in clusters of three. It may have yellow or green flowers and clusters of green-yellow or white berries.

Poison ivy is found nationwide, with the exception of Alaska, Hawaii and some portions of the western coastline. Each leaf includes three glossy leaflets that vary in color (and sometimes shape) throughout the year – red in spring, green in summer and yellow, orange or red in the fall. It can grow as a shrub or as hairy, ropelike vines sometimes seen growing up the sides of trees.

Poison sumac grows as a woody shrub or small tree primarily in the eastern half of the U.S. Leaves feature multiple pairs of leaflets that have a smooth, velvet-like texture. Flowers and fruit are similar to those produced by poison oak or poison ivy, but hang in loose clusters.

Misinformation about poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac abounds, making it important to separate fact from fiction.

Fiction: Only the leaves are toxic. Fact: All parts of the plants can trigger an allergic response, including the leaves, roots, flowers, berries, stems and vines.

Fiction: The painful rash can be spread through watery fluid found in blisters. Fact: Only exposure to the oily toxin urushiol will trigger a reaction – not the fluid in blisters. Rashes often emerge over a series of days, though, which can make it seem as though they are spreading as blisters ooze.

Fiction: If you don’t touch the plants directly, you’re in the clear. Fact: Toxic oils can linger on clothes, gardening gloves, tools, shoes and even pet fur – producing a skin rash just as if you touched the plant yourself. Wash your tools, clothing and pets regularly, especially after an exposure. The oils can remain potent for months and even years.

Fiction: You can dispose of poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac just as you would any other weed. Fact: It is important to take great care in disposing of plants that you pull, mow or dig. You don’t want yourself or others to be exposed to oily toxins that remain. Be especially careful to never use burning as a disposal strategy. Inhaling the smoke can cause a whole-body reaction.

Fiction: There is nothing I can do to avoid a rash if I’ve touched poison oak, poison ivy or poison sumac. Fact: You may be able to avoid a rash or reduce its severity by pouring rubbing alcohol over the exposed area as soon as possible and washing with running water. Clinical tests show that dishwashing detergent is also effective at removing the rash-causing urushiol toxin.

Fiction: Some people are simply immune to urushiol-induced rashes. Fact: While it is true some individuals are not bothered by a rash, sensitivity to urushiol can develop at any time. Once you’ve had a rash, you can become more sensitive and have a stronger allergic response the next time you are exposed.

“Prevention is paramount when it comes to poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac,” Van Wychen says. “If you plan to work or play in an area where it may be growing, wear protective clothing, including long sleeves and long pants tucked into your boots or hiking shoes. Being a bit warm may be a better alternative than days of suffering from a painful rash.”

For more information about poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac, visit http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/plants.

About the Weed Science Society of America

The Weed Science Society of America, a nonprofit scientific society, was founded in 1956 to encourage and promote the development of knowledge concerning weeds and their impact on the environment. The Society promotes research, education and extension outreach activities related to weeds, provides science-based information to the public and policy makers, fosters awareness of weeds and their impact on managed and natural ecosystems, and promotes cooperation among weed science organizations across the nation and around the world. For more information, visit http://www.wssa.net.

Sidebar:

Managing poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac

Today there are several options for control – and more may be on the horizon.

Chemical Treatment

One of the most effective is the use of herbicides. Two or more treatments may be needed, though, as the plants are very persistent. Spray spreading vines with products containing glyphosate, dicamba, 2,4-D or triclopyr, using tank mixtures of these products when possible.

When poison oak or poison ivy grows as a climbing vine, the same products can be used as a “cut stump” treatment. Cut the stem a few inches above ground and treat the stump with your herbicide to keep it from resprouting. Remember to always read and follow label directions before buying or using these products.

Mechanical Treatment

If the weeds are growing in an open and accessible location, mowing is a possibility. Mow repeatedly throughout the growing season, though, or the rootstock will simply sprout new plants.

You can hand-pull or dig the plants, but you run the risk of exposure. In addition, any root stalks missed are likely to sprout again. Don’t burn the plants you’ve removed. Toxic oils can be spread by smoke and cause a full-body reaction. You’ll need to bury the plants in a safe spot.

Possible Future Treatment Alternative: Biocontrol

Researchers at Virginia Tech University are exploring whether poison ivy can be controlled by a naturally occurring fungus (Colletotrichum fioriniae). High concentrations have been used to kill seedlings in the lab. Further research is underway to determine whether the fungus can be applied in granular form to control poison ivy in the wild, without impacting surrounding plants.


Read this article:

Common Myths About Poison Oak, Poison Ivy and Poison Sumac: WSSA Experts Separate Fact From Fiction

Poison Ivy An old enemy lies in wait for the unsuspecting

Poison ivy is out in full force, and will be hanging around until a hard frost sends it away.

“Every five years or so, I get poison ivy,” said gardening expert Margaret Hagen of the University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension. “It usually takes me four to six weeks to get rid of it. It’s awful, so I try hard not to get it.”

Exposure to urushiol, an oil produced by the plant and found in its leaves and stems, causes an allergic reaction — the itchy rash. Some people have reactions so severe they need medical attention or even hospitalization.

There are three types of poison ivy common to the Granite State, according to Helaine Hughes, owner of The Poison Ivy Removal Company in Greenfield. There’s the Eastern climbing variety that can take over trees and power lines, Western ivy that grows like a shrub, and Rydberg’s, a creeping variety of poison ivy.

“The biggest problem that people have is they don’t know how to identify poison ivy,” Hughes said.

In the spring, the three-leaved plant is reddish-green and shiny. In the summer, it becomes a dull, matte green almost like poinsettia leaves, Hughes said. And in the fall, poison ivy takes on the quintessential fall colors, turning brilliant red, orange and gold.

Poison ivy thrives in the edges between two landscapes, according to Hagen. The space between a forest and a field, the border between a garden and a lawn, or banks of a riverbed on the side of the road are all prime locations.

“For some reason, poison ivy likes edges,” Hagen said.

The plant spreads through underground runners, said Hughes, but also with the help of birds who eat the seeds from poison ivy berries in the fall and drop them into stone walls or garden beds or into rivers, where they travel downstream and take root.

Getting rid of it

Getting rid of poison ivy is a chore, said Hagen, because the plant is hardy, will grow in just about any conditions, and is invasive. With a small infestation, she recommends going after the plant and its roots with loppers and applying weed and brush killer to the open cut on the stem. Larger patches can be fought back with some persistence and some Roundup or an organic acid-based herbicide — both of which come with drawbacks and controversy.

What Hughes does to remove poison ivy from her clients’ properties is to go after the plant at the roots. Dressed in Tyvek suits with thick rubber gloves taped at the wrist, and overshoes, Hughes and her all-female team seek out the poison ivy and follow it to where it began, yanking it out and depositing it in black plastic bags that will then be hauled to the dump.

Persistence is necessary because it can keep coming back if people aren’t watching for it.

“Poison ivy thrives when people aren’t paying attention,” said Hagen.

When it comes to disposing of poison ivy, the most important rule is to never, ever burn it, said Hagen. When burned, the oil from the plant becomes airborne and can be inhaled into the lungs, causing an internal case of poison ivy that could require hospitalization.

It’s also unwise to put poison ivy into a compost heap; anywhere it’s thrown, it can take root and grow anew. The best advice Hagen and Hughes offer is to bag it and bring it to the dump, being careful not to get the oil on the outside of the bag.

Precautionary measures

Hughes and her employees are all susceptible to poison ivy, so they use extreme measures to ensure the urushiol oil doesn’t contaminate their equipment, vehicles or skin.

After handling the ivy, Hughes and company carefully strip off their protective clothing and throw it away, and then scrub with Tecnu, a product that binds to the oil and prevents it from being absorbed into the skin.

“We follow the 15-minute rule,” said Hughes. “You’ve got to get the oil off of you in 15 minutes or less if you’re going to avoid getting the rash. And it’s less than that for people with sensitive skin.”

Using cold water, not hot, is best for washing the oil off the skin, said Dr. Christine Doherty of Balance Point Natural Medicine in Milford. Hot water can open the pores of the skin, allowing the oil to get in.

Another product that helps is Ivyblock, said Doherty. It creates a barrier and keeps the oil from being absorbed into the skin.

Anything that comes in contact with the oil should be washed immediately after exposure — including clothing, shoes, and especially pets, who can track the oil around the house. Unless it’s exposed to rain or some sort of solvent like rubbing alcohol, urushiol can hang around for years, Hughes said.

nfoster@newstote.com

Link to original:

Poison Ivy An old enemy lies in wait for the unsuspecting

Walls: Poison ivy arrives with warmer weather

While walking in the woods the other day, a couple of observations reminded me that it is the season that people will be venturing outdoors for warm-weather activity.

Besides the many fire ant mounds that I encountered (I wrote about the scourge of fire ants a few weeks back), one plant that can cause some real discomfort was readily evident on several tree trunks and posts that I walked past. Poison ivy was heartily growing all along my route.

Advertisement

Poison ivy has leaflets of three leaves per segment. Thus, the saying “Leaves of three, leave it be.” On many plants, the vines have hair-like tendrils that assist in attaching the vines to the tree trunks on which they are growing.

Approximately eight out of ten people will have some sort of skin reaction to poison ivy. When coming in contact with the oil contained in all parts of the plant (roots, vines, stems, branches and leaves), a skin rash of varying degrees of severity will break out between eight hours and three days after contact with the oil. The rash can last a few days or two to three weeks depending on your body’s reaction to the oil and where on the body you come in contact with the oil.

Touching a garden implement or clothing exposed to the oil or pet hair exposed to poison ivy are additional ways to break out in a reaction. There are also reports of people breathing in the smoke of someone burning poison ivy. The lungs and poison ivy smoke are not compatible. This can be a serious situation and medical attention is always recommended. In most cases, exposure to someone with a poison ivy rash is not contagious. It is the direct exposure to the oil in the plant that causes the rash.

Although many of us do have a reaction to exposure with the oil in poison ivy, many types of wildlife readily feed on the berries that will be on the plants later on in the year. In addition to some small mammals, more than three dozen species of birds have been recorded feeding on poison ivy fruit.

On one tree, accompanying the many vines of poison ivy was a similar plant often misidentified as poison ivy. Virginia creeper was mixed in with the ivy. “Leaves of five, let it thrive” is the saying that applies to Virginia creeper. There are reports of some poison ivy plants having leaflets of five, but I have not yet found this. It is advisable to learn the difference in the two types of plants. The best bet, however, is to avoid any climbing vine if you are not sure. Better to be safe than sorry.

Don’t be afraid to venture out this spring or summer. Our great outdoors hold wonderful experiences for all of us. Just take a bit of time to educate yourself about the plants and animals that are our wild neighbors. In most cases, they were here long before we arrived in the neighborhood.

Enjoy your nature trails.

For questions or comments, email jwalls443@gmail.com.

Taken from: 

Walls: Poison ivy arrives with warmer weather

Wordpress SEO Plugin by SEOPressor