_ap_ufes{"success":true,"siteUrl":"howtotreatpoisonivy.com","urls":{"Home":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com","Category":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/category/poison-ivy-news/","Archive":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/2015/04/","Post":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/go-ahead-little-goat-eat-some-poison-ivy-it-wont-hurt-a-bit/","Page":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/5-myths-treating-poison-ivy-rashes/","Nav_menu_item":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/96/"}}_ap_ufee

December 14, 2018

The goats fighting America's plant invasion

Read more:  

The goats fighting America's plant invasion

The goats fighting America's plant invasion

Link – 

The goats fighting America's plant invasion

Yahoo Reveals Most-Searched Halloween Costumes for 2014

Looks like there will be a lot of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles on the streets this Halloween.

Yahoo recently released the top-searched Halloween costumes this year, and “ninja turtle costume” tops the list, with searches jumping whopping 5,225 percent from the previous week.

See more Halloween 2014: From ‘Guardians’ to a Three-Breasted Woman, 23 Pop Culture-Inspired Costumes

Also making the list were three characters from Frozen — Elsa, Anna and Olaf — as well as Maleficent and The Hunger Games’ Katniss, along with the generic “superhero costumes” and, more specifically, Wonder Woman and Catwoman.

As one might expect, Frozen also topped the list of most-searched costumes for kids, followed by Star Wars.

Check out the lists of most-searched costumes on Yahoo below.

Top “buzzing costumes”:

1. Ninja Turtle Costume – up 5,225 percent from the previous week

2. Pirate Costumes – up 4,045 percent

3. Star Wars Costumes – up 2,828 percent

4. Poison Ivy Costume – up 2,222 percent

5. Superhero Costumes – up 1,328 percent

6. Catwoman Costume – up 1,163 percent

7. Monster High Costume – up 1,113 percent

8. Olaf Costumes – up 1067 percent

9. Elsa Frozen Costume – up 985 percent

10. Tinkerbell Costume – up 951 percent

11. Pocahontas Costume – up 931 percent

12. Minnie Mouse Costume – up 928 percent

13. Alice in Wonderland Costumes – up 875 percent

14. Little Red Riding Hood Costume – up 798 percent

15. Great Gatsby Costumes – up 702 percent

16. Minion Costume – up 609 percent

17. Maleficent Costume – up 460 percent

18. Wonder Woman Costume – up 162 percent

19. Frozen Anna Costume – 150 percent

20. Katniss Everdeen Costume – up 85 percent

Read more Ebola Halloween Costume Sparks Outrage

Top-spiking Halloween costume searches based on recent movie characters:

1. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles – up 356 percent

2. Great Gatsby – up 293 percent

3. Black Widow (The Avengers) – up 243 percent

4. Anna (Frozen) – up 240 percent

5. Deadpool (upcoming X-men movie) – up 148 percent

6. Maleficent – up 143 percent

7. Star Lord (Guardians of the Galaxy) – up 138 percent

8. Elsa (Frozen) – up 117 percent

9. Groot (Guardians of the Galaxy) – up 113 percent

10. Katniss (Hunger Games trilogy) – up 97 percent

11. Captain America (The Avengers) – up 54 percent

Top-spiking Halloween costume searches based on classic movie characters:

1. Red Riding Hood – up 466 percent

2. Cheshire Cat (Alice in Wonderland) – up 404 percent

3. Scarecrow (Wizard of Oz) – up 399p ercent

4. Thing 1 and Thing 2 (The Cat in the Hat) – up 188 percent

5. Batman – up 184 percent

6. Joker (Batman) – up 98 percent

7. Queen of Hearts (Alice in Wonderland) – up 73 percent

8. Mary Poppins – up 56 percent

9. Mad Hatter (Alice in Wonderland) – up 50 percent

10. Cleopatra – up 36 percent

11. Catwoman (Batman) – up 34 percent

Read more Martha Stewart Is Hosting a Halloween Fashion Competition

Top-searched Halloween costumes for kids:

1. Frozen

2. Star Wars

3. Monster High Costumes

4. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

5. Captain America Costume

6. Transformers Costumes

7. Disney’s Maleficent Movie Costumes

8. Guardians of the Galaxy

9. Lalaloopsy Halloween Costumes

10. Skylanders Halloween Costumes

See more here: 

Yahoo Reveals Most-Searched Halloween Costumes for 2014

Do you recognize this mystery plant?

Poison ivy isn’t “evil.” Neither are spiders or hurricanes.

Some plants do cause problems, of course. Poison ivy is a “problem” plant for humans in that it causes lots of people to break out in allergic reactions, sometimes severely.

Yet poison ivy is in fact a widespread native species, providing wildlife food for a variety of critters. It is a common component of many natural ecosystems and has been here in our landscapes a lot longer than we humans have.

On the other hand, there are some plants that have not been around very long, relatively speaking. These are the weeds.

Some weeds are rather innocuous, rarely causing problems. But then other weeds are ravenously destructive, showing up in our lawns, gardens, agricultural fields, just about anywhere.

The thing we should remember about weeds, whether benign or destructive, is that nearly all of them have been introduced by humans into a previously weed-free environment. You might think of these introduced species as “guests,” sometimes invited intentionally, sometimes not. The problem with guests, of course, is that sometimes they stay too long.

And then there is our mystery plant.

It is a gorgeous herb, capable of producing masses of beautiful foliage. The sheathing, pointed leaves are produced on flimsy, fleshy stems that flop over and make new roots. I’ve seen some of these plants producing brightly variegated leaves, striped with yellow.

Flowering occurs in the autumn, until frost. Usually, a single flower will pop up at the end of a stem or in a leaf axil. Each flower is about half an inch wide, with three white or pink petals. Small pods form afterward, containing little seeds.

This is a species that occurs naturally in much of southern Asia, from India to Korea and Japan. Here’s the scary thing: It is now a common component of wetland systems in North America, and is surely present in every Southeastern state. It is also known now as a weed in Oregon and Washington.

For a number of years, botanists knew of it in the South only from the coastal plain, but more recently it has invaded piedmont and mountain settings. It is notorious for rampant growth, crowding out everything around it, and it is definitely invasive. How did it arrive?

One theory is that seeds of this plant were introduced — accidentally — into South Carolina late in the 17th century, contaminating rice seed. According to this idea, this species remained confined to rice fields of South Carolina, and then elsewhere in the Southeast, until relatively recently, and then for whatever reasons, it has taken on a new and more threatening behavior, easily spreading into new habitats.

Waterfowl, which like to eat the seeds, are implicated in this spread. The stems root with such ease that it is no surprise fragments of the plants could easily start up after being transported somewhere else.

Although it isn’t “evil”, this plant guest has gained a nasty reputation. And it doesn’t look like it

wants to leave any time soon.

John Nelson is the curator of the A. C. Moore Herbarium at the University of South Carolina, in the Department of Biological Sciences. As a public service, the herbarium offers free plant identifications. For more information, visit www.herbarium.org, call 803-777-8196 or email nelson@sc.edu.

Answer: “Nasty-weed,” “Asiatic dew-flower,” Murdannia keisak

Source:

Do you recognize this mystery plant?

Report: Mosquitoes, poison ivy to grow with climate change

Report: Mosquitoes, poison ivy to grow with climate change

“;
document.getElementById(‘premiumMsg’).innerHTML = contentStr;
document.getElementById(‘premiumMsg’).style.display = “block”;
} else if (userSingleSale == “Reguser”)
contentStr = “

” + userStoriesViewed + ” of 10 clicks used this month


UPGRADEyour account for full access to SouthCoastToday.com

“;
document.getElementById(‘premiumMsg’).innerHTML = contentStr;
document.getElementById(‘premiumMsg’).style.display = “block”;
else if (userSingleSale == “PREMIUM01”)
document.getElementById(‘premiumMsg’).style.display = “none”;

August 22, 2014 12:00 AM

There’s bad news for nature lovers this week: The most annoying outdoor bugs and pests will only get peskier and more prevalent with climate change.

Tiger mosquitoes, poison ivy, deer ticks and fire ants will all be conquering new ground and expanding their range as temperatures rise with global warming, according to a report released this week from the National Wildlife Federation called “Ticked off: America’s outdoor experience and climate change.”

On SouthCoast the pest that is most concerning is the tiger mosquito, said Dr. Doug Inkley, who authored the report.

Tiger mosquitoes can carry 30 different types of diseases, including West Nile Virus, EEE and Dengue fever, among others. Unlike many species of mosquitoes which are mostly active at dusk and dawn, tiger mosquitoes are active all day long, posing a particular threat to humans.

Currently, tiger mosquitoes, an invasive species from Asia, are present in southeastern Pennsylvania and the “very coastal areas” of Connecticut and Rhode Island.

By 2020, that will change thanks to global warming, Inkley said. By 2020 tiger mosquitoes could be present in all of coastal Massachusetts as rising temperatures encourage them to come north.

“Basically this host species, which carries diseases, is going to be out there all day, greatly increasing the exposure risk to humans,” Inkley said.

Just because a warmer climate will be favorable to tiger mosquitoes does not mean it will be favorable for all 30 of the diseases they can carry.

Still, Inkley said there is a cause for concern.

Another pest that will impact SouthCoast is poison ivy. Like all plants, poison ivy thrives when there is more carbon dioxide, a symptom of global warming. Poison ivy can also thrive in a warmer environment, meaning the plant will become more prevalent.

Perhaps more concerning, however, is that the combination of added heat and carbon dioxide will also increase the toxicity of urushiol, the part of poison ivy that causes allergic reactions in humans.

“This report shows that there are significant pests that we do deal with now but that we will have to take more effort to deal with in the future,” Inkley said.

He said he did not want the report to discourage people from spending time outdoors, noting that “the outdoor experience is so important to children and their health.”

But, he said, unless public policy changes so that the amount of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere decreases significantly, people will have to be much more vigilant when they are outside.

“We already know how to protect ourselves by wearing long clothing, and we should continue to do that,” he said. “But we also need to cut our carbon emissions and invest in renewable energy.”

Follow Ariel Wittenberg on Twitter at @awittenberg_SCT


We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Rules. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or fill out this form. New comments are only accepted for two weeks from the date of publication.

Original post: 

Report: Mosquitoes, poison ivy to grow with climate change

Experts address myths about poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac

Experts address myths about poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac

Advertisement

With summer temperatures luring us outdoors, scientists with the Weed Science Society of America say it’s a great time for refresher course on poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac. All three thrive during summer months and are known to trigger highly irritating skin rashes that can last for many days.

“When you look at the thousands of people exposed each year and at the misery a rash can produce, poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac certainly rank among the most notorious weeds in the nation,” says Lee Van Wychen, Ph.D., WSSA science policy director.

All three belong to the Toxicodendron genus and produce irritating urushiol oils. When urushiol comes in contact with the skin of sensitive individuals, itching and watery blisters will follow.

Poison oak and poison ivy in particular are common fixtures in many outdoor landscapes, often tucked among other native vegetation and growing as either a low shrub or trailing vine. Both produce small, whitish green flowers in the spring, followed by small berries in the summer. Birds enjoy the seeds and help to spread the weeds into new areas.

Poison sumac is rarer, and tends to be found primarily in wetlands. This characteristic is one of several differences among the three weed species and where they are found.

Poison oak grows as a low shrub in eastern and southern states and in tall clumps or long vines on the Pacific Coast. Fuzzy green leaves grow in clusters of three. It may have yellow or green flowers and clusters of green-yellow or white berries.

Poison ivy is found nationwide, with the exception of Alaska, Hawaii and some portions of the western coastline. Each leaf includes three glossy leaflets that vary in color (and sometimes shape) throughout the year—red in spring, green in summer and yellow, orange or red in the fall. It can grow as a shrub or as hairy, ropelike vines sometimes seen growing up the sides of trees.

Poison sumac grows as a woody shrub or small tree primarily in the eastern half of the U.S. Leaves feature multiple pairs of leaflets that have a smooth, velvet-like texture. Flowers and fruit are similar to those produced by poison oak or poison ivy, but hang in loose clusters.

Misinformation about poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac abounds, making it important to separate fact from fiction.

Fiction—Only the leaves are toxic.

Fact—All parts of the plants can trigger an allergic response, including the leaves, roots, flowers, berries, stems and vines.

Fiction—The painful rash can be spread through watery fluid found in blisters.

Fact—Only exposure to the oily toxin urushiol will trigger a reaction—not the fluid in blisters. Rashes often emerge over a series of days, though, which can make it seem as though they are spreading as blisters ooze.

Fiction—If you don’t touch the plants directly, you’re in the clear.

Fact—Toxic oils can linger on clothes, gardening gloves, tools, shoes and even pet fur—producing a skin rash just as if you touched the plant yourself. Wash your tools, clothing and pets regularly, especially after an exposure. The oils can remain potent for months and even years.

Fiction—You can dispose of poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac just as you would any other weed.

Fact—It is important to take great care in disposing of plants that you pull, mow or dig. You don’t want yourself or others to be exposed to oily toxins that remain. Be especially careful to never use burning as a disposal strategy. Inhaling the smoke can cause a whole-body reaction.

Fiction—There is nothing I can do to avoid a rash if I’ve touched poison oak, poison ivy or poison sumac.

Fact—You may be able to avoid a rash or reduce its severity by pouring rubbing alcohol over the exposed area as soon as possible and washing with running water. Clinical tests show that dishwashing detergent is also effective at removing the rash-causing urushiol toxin.

Fiction—Some people are simply immune to urushiol-induced rashes.

Fact—While it is true some individuals are not bothered by a rash, sensitivity to urushiol can develop at any time. Once you’ve had a rash, you can become more sensitive and have a stronger allergic response the next time you are exposed.

“Prevention is paramount when it comes to poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac,” Van Wychen says. “If you plan to work or play in an area where it may be growing, wear protective clothing, including long sleeves and long pants tucked into your boots or hiking shoes. Being a bit warm may be a better alternative than days of suffering from a painful rash.”

For more information about poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac, visit www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/plants.

The Weed Science Society of America, a nonprofit scientific society, was founded in 1956 to encourage and promote the development of knowledge concerning weeds and their impact on the environment. The Society promotes research, education and extension outreach activities related to weeds, provides science-based information to the public and policy makers, fosters awareness of weeds and their impact on managed and natural ecosystems, and promotes cooperation among weed science organizations across the nation and around the world. For more information, visit www.wssa.net.

Sidebar:

Managing poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac

Today there are several options for control—and more may be on the horizon.

Chemical treatment

One of the most effective is the use of herbicides. Two or more treatments may be needed, though, as the plants are very persistent. Spray spreading vines with products containing glyphosate, dicamba, 2,4-D or triclopyr, using tank mixtures of these products when possible.

When poison oak or poison ivy grows as a climbing vine, the same products can be used as a “cut stump” treatment. Cut the stem a few inches above ground and treat the stump with your herbicide to keep it from resprouting. Remember to always read and follow label directions before buying or using these products.

Mechanical treatment

If the weeds are growing in an open and accessible location, mowing is a possibility. Mow repeatedly throughout the growing season, though, or the rootstock will simply sprout new plants.

You can hand-pull or dig the plants, but you run the risk of exposure. In addition, any root stalks missed are likely to sprout again. Don’t burn the plants you’ve removed. Toxic oils can be spread by smoke and cause a full-body reaction. You’ll need to bury the plants in a safe spot.

Possible future treatment alternative—biocontrol

Researchers at Virginia Tech University are exploring whether poison ivy can be controlled by a naturally occurring fungus (Colletotrichum fioriniae). High concentrations have been used to kill seedlings in the lab. Further research is underway to determine whether the fungus can be applied in granular form to control poison ivy in the wild, without impacting surrounding plants.

Date: 7/21/2014




Copyright 1995-2014. High
Plains Publishers, Inc.
All rights reserved. Any republishing
of these pages, including electronic reproduction of the editorial archives
or classified advertising, is strictly prohibited. If you have questions or
comments you can reach us at
High Plains Journal
1500 E. Wyatt Earp Blvd., P.O. Box 760, Dodge City, KS 67801
or call 1-800-452-7171. Email:
webmaster@hpj.com

See the article here – 

Experts address myths about poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac

Common Myths About Poison Oak, Poison Ivy and Poison Sumac: WSSA Experts Separate Fact From Fiction

Lawrence, Kansas (PRWEB) July 02, 2014

With summer temperatures luring us outdoors, scientists with the Weed Science Society of America (WSSA) say it’s a great time for refresher course on poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac. All three thrive during summer months and are known to trigger highly irritating skin rashes that can last for many days.

“When you look at the thousands of people exposed each year and at the misery a rash can produce, poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac certainly rank among the most notorious weeds in the nation,” says Lee Van Wychen, Ph.D., WSSA science policy director.

All three belong to the Toxicodendron genus and produce irritating urushiol oils. When urushiol comes in contact with the skin of sensitive individuals, itching and watery blisters will follow.

Poison oak and poison ivy in particular are common fixtures in many outdoor landscapes, often tucked among other native vegetation and growing as either a low shrub or trailing vine. Both produce small, whitish green flowers in the spring, followed by small berries in the summer. Birds enjoy the seeds and help to spread the weeds into new areas.

Poison sumac is rarer, and tends to be found primarily in wetlands. This characteristic is one of several differences among the three weed species and where they are found.

Poison oak grows as a low shrub in eastern and southern states and in tall clumps or long vines on the Pacific Coast. Fuzzy green leaves grow in clusters of three. It may have yellow or green flowers and clusters of green-yellow or white berries.

Poison ivy is found nationwide, with the exception of Alaska, Hawaii and some portions of the western coastline. Each leaf includes three glossy leaflets that vary in color (and sometimes shape) throughout the year – red in spring, green in summer and yellow, orange or red in the fall. It can grow as a shrub or as hairy, ropelike vines sometimes seen growing up the sides of trees.

Poison sumac grows as a woody shrub or small tree primarily in the eastern half of the U.S. Leaves feature multiple pairs of leaflets that have a smooth, velvet-like texture. Flowers and fruit are similar to those produced by poison oak or poison ivy, but hang in loose clusters.

Misinformation about poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac abounds, making it important to separate fact from fiction.

Fiction: Only the leaves are toxic. Fact: All parts of the plants can trigger an allergic response, including the leaves, roots, flowers, berries, stems and vines.

Fiction: The painful rash can be spread through watery fluid found in blisters. Fact: Only exposure to the oily toxin urushiol will trigger a reaction – not the fluid in blisters. Rashes often emerge over a series of days, though, which can make it seem as though they are spreading as blisters ooze.

Fiction: If you don’t touch the plants directly, you’re in the clear. Fact: Toxic oils can linger on clothes, gardening gloves, tools, shoes and even pet fur – producing a skin rash just as if you touched the plant yourself. Wash your tools, clothing and pets regularly, especially after an exposure. The oils can remain potent for months and even years.

Fiction: You can dispose of poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac just as you would any other weed. Fact: It is important to take great care in disposing of plants that you pull, mow or dig. You don’t want yourself or others to be exposed to oily toxins that remain. Be especially careful to never use burning as a disposal strategy. Inhaling the smoke can cause a whole-body reaction.

Fiction: There is nothing I can do to avoid a rash if I’ve touched poison oak, poison ivy or poison sumac. Fact: You may be able to avoid a rash or reduce its severity by pouring rubbing alcohol over the exposed area as soon as possible and washing with running water. Clinical tests show that dishwashing detergent is also effective at removing the rash-causing urushiol toxin.

Fiction: Some people are simply immune to urushiol-induced rashes. Fact: While it is true some individuals are not bothered by a rash, sensitivity to urushiol can develop at any time. Once you’ve had a rash, you can become more sensitive and have a stronger allergic response the next time you are exposed.

“Prevention is paramount when it comes to poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac,” Van Wychen says. “If you plan to work or play in an area where it may be growing, wear protective clothing, including long sleeves and long pants tucked into your boots or hiking shoes. Being a bit warm may be a better alternative than days of suffering from a painful rash.”

For more information about poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac, visit http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/plants.

About the Weed Science Society of America

The Weed Science Society of America, a nonprofit scientific society, was founded in 1956 to encourage and promote the development of knowledge concerning weeds and their impact on the environment. The Society promotes research, education and extension outreach activities related to weeds, provides science-based information to the public and policy makers, fosters awareness of weeds and their impact on managed and natural ecosystems, and promotes cooperation among weed science organizations across the nation and around the world. For more information, visit http://www.wssa.net.

Sidebar:

Managing poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac

Today there are several options for control – and more may be on the horizon.

Chemical Treatment

One of the most effective is the use of herbicides. Two or more treatments may be needed, though, as the plants are very persistent. Spray spreading vines with products containing glyphosate, dicamba, 2,4-D or triclopyr, using tank mixtures of these products when possible.

When poison oak or poison ivy grows as a climbing vine, the same products can be used as a “cut stump” treatment. Cut the stem a few inches above ground and treat the stump with your herbicide to keep it from resprouting. Remember to always read and follow label directions before buying or using these products.

Mechanical Treatment

If the weeds are growing in an open and accessible location, mowing is a possibility. Mow repeatedly throughout the growing season, though, or the rootstock will simply sprout new plants.

You can hand-pull or dig the plants, but you run the risk of exposure. In addition, any root stalks missed are likely to sprout again. Don’t burn the plants you’ve removed. Toxic oils can be spread by smoke and cause a full-body reaction. You’ll need to bury the plants in a safe spot.

Possible Future Treatment Alternative: Biocontrol

Researchers at Virginia Tech University are exploring whether poison ivy can be controlled by a naturally occurring fungus (Colletotrichum fioriniae). High concentrations have been used to kill seedlings in the lab. Further research is underway to determine whether the fungus can be applied in granular form to control poison ivy in the wild, without impacting surrounding plants.


Read this article:

Common Myths About Poison Oak, Poison Ivy and Poison Sumac: WSSA Experts Separate Fact From Fiction

Matt Argall Explores the Prospects of Greeting Cards Industry

MIAMI, FL–(Marketwired – Mar 25, 2014) – “What do you get when you cross poison ivy with a four-leaf clover? A rash of good luck.” These, or other more traditional jokes, wishes or sayings are printed on millions of St. Patrick’s Day cards that people sent and received all over the country on March 17th this year. St. Patrick’s Day, or “Lá Fhéile Pádraig”, as the Irish call it, is a cultural and religious holiday that commemorates the death date of Saint Patrick, the patron of Ireland, who lived from AD 385-461. Saint Patrick’s Day was made an official Christian holiday at the beginning of the seventeenth century to celebrate the arrival of Christianity in Ireland. It is a celebration of the Irish heritage and culture in general and by no means restricted to Ireland. Irish and non-Irish people all over the world dress in green, party and send out greeting cards to their Gaelic and not-so-Gaelic friends.

On average, this amounts to approximately 7 million St. Patrick’s Day cards every year. And compared to Christmas, this number is not even that impressive: Each December the USPS delivers around 1.6 billion merry wishes all over the U.S. The tradition of sending greeting cards is even older than Saint Patrick — it can be traced back to the ancient Chinese, who exchanged messages to celebrate the New Year, and to the early Egyptians, who conveyed their greetings on papyrus scrolls. Europeans started to exchange handmade paper greeting cards around 1400 and by the 1850s they had become a popular and affordable means of personal communication, mainly due to the advances in the printing technology. Louis Prang, a German immigrant, started the greeting card industry in America with his small lithographic business near Boston in 1856. Today, Americans purchase approximately 6.5 billion cards every year, making it a profitable market that Matt Argall, an avid entrepreneur, is now looking to venture into.

While printing techniques have changed over the centuries, cards are available in a multitude of different paper types and the sentiments got a more modern twist to them, the basic idea of a greeting card is still the same: Expressing friendly wishes to somebody we care about. Businessman Matt Argall has been watching the greeting card industry as a possible new business venture, and with retail sales summing up to roughly $8 billion every year, it is not hard to understand why. Despite the increase in electronic greeting cards, the popularity of paper cards has not faded. Some marketers even say, especially younger generations, who spend a lot of time during their work and free time in front of the computer, value traditional cards and continue to buy them.

Matt Argall worked for the Human Rights Commission, where he learned a great deal about marketing. In his position as treasurer and later president of the group, he was in close contact with people making donations to his human rights cause, most of which were from marketing companies’ owners. Instead of trying to reinvent the wheel, Matt seized the opportunity to learn from their experience. He went on to start his first own company with over 100 employees in the gas and electricity industry, followed by other businesses in a variety of trades. Matt Argall never restricts himself to one branch. He watches the markets, always ready to jump onto new opportunities. Most recently he has been analyzing the greeting card industry. We wish him a rash of good luck!

Matt Argall News: http://www.mattargallnews.com

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/matt_argall

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Matt-Argall/323183061170502

Contact:

PR Agency

ICMediaDirect.com

TEL: 1.800.595.0821


www.ICMediaDirect.com

Taken from:

Matt Argall Explores the Prospects of Greeting Cards Industry

Neahring: Hazards of poison ivy

I like summertime. Even though I haven’t been a student for several decades, I still think of summer as break time, a chance to kick back, enjoy the sunshine and relax a little. If it wasn’t for that pesky part-time job and full-time motherhood thing, I could really do some serious lounging.

Spending time outdoors in the warm weather is a great way to unwind, but a person has to beware of dangerous flora and fauna lurking around. Actually, aside from a few disgruntled groundhogs, the fauna in our yard isn’t all that deadly, but the flora is potentially fraught with peril. I don’t mean large, carnivorous shrubbery that devours people, (although I saw that once in a science fiction movie, and I believe it could totally happen), but the more insidious, itchy kind of danger you get from plants like poison ivy.

Poison ivy, whose scientific name is Toxico radicans, has been around for a long time. It was first discovered and named in America by Captain John Smith, the famous 17th century explorer and friend of Pocahontas. Poison ivy and its equally treacherous cousins, poison oak and poison sumac, are found throughout most of the United States and cause an itchy rash following contact. Most people are susceptible to poison ivy, although about 15 percent of the population is not sensitive to the effects of the plant and does not get a rash.

The rash of poison ivy is caused by the plant oil urushiol, found in all parts of the plant including leaves, stem, and roots. Your child may develop symptoms through direct contact with the oils on the plant itself, or by touching a contaminated object such as clothes or shoes. The plant oils can remain on objects and retain potency for many years. Pets can carry the plant oils on their fur, although they do not get the rash. Burning poison ivy releases the oils into the air, and the particles may travel airborne to the skin or be inhaled. Touching another person with poison ivy does not typically transmit the rash, since the plant oils are quickly absorbed into human skin on initial contact.

The poison ivy rash is red and itchy, often with blisters in a straight line. The reaction may not appear for several hours to days after exposure to the plant oil. The rash is not contagious, but can be spread from place to place on a child by residual plant oil under his fingernails when he scratches.

If your child has been exposed to poison ivy, wash the area with warm soapy water as soon as possible to remove the plant oils before they are absorbed into the skin. Water that is too hot may open the pores, allowing for increased absorption. Apply a cool compress or an ice cube to relieve itching and swelling. Oatmeal-based bath products and lotions (like Aveeno) and oral antihistamines (Benadryl) can be helpful for symptoms as well.

Calamine lotion, a combination of zinc oxide and iron oxide, has been used to treat the itch of poison ivy since the 19th century, but it can be quite drying for some children with sensitive skin. Over-the-counter 1 percent hydrocortisone cream can be used in mild cases, and your doctor can order a stronger prescription steroid cream or ointment if necessary.

While most cases of poison ivy go away on their own within two weeks, you should call your doctor if your child’s rash is particularly extensive, extreme or appears infected. Significant lesions on the face, especially around the eyes, may warrant a visit as well. Your doctor may prescribe oral steroids (or occasionally, a steroid injection) to relieve inflammation. Topical or oral antibiotics are indicated for a rash that has become infected, usually through repeated scratching.

An individual’s sensitivity to poison ivy can change from season to season, so even a highly susceptible person may become less responsive to the plant oils over time. In the interim, it might be best to stay away from foliage with leaves of three and avoid any shrubbery with a shady attitude.

From:  

Neahring: Hazards of poison ivy

Beware of Poison Ivy

ACROSS WNY- A hike in the outdoors is a peaceful and beautiful experience, but it always pays to know your surroundings. There are a lot of things in the environment that can cause harm if one is not careful,and many of these organisms are hiding in plain sight, so awareness is key.

Poison Ivy is a perfect example. Dave McQuay of NY State Parks says the plant is abundant throughout the region, and learning to identify it is a must for anyone spending time outdoors.” They always say leaves of three let it be, and often Poison Ivy takes on different forms, it can be a small plant, it can be shrub like, or it can vine up trees.If it vines up, you want to look for the hairy roots going to the bark, usually brown in color.”

Coming in contact with the plant is not fun. Damaging the leaves or stem releases an oily compound called Urishiol which can cause a serious rash on those who are allergic to it. ” The oil leaches out of the leaves” says McQuay ” and absorbs through the seven layers of your skin, your body reacts to that,and it actually causes inflammation and your body produces a rash if you’re allergic to.”

Native to North America,the plant has been thriving for centuries. Throughout the years, Poison Ivy has been both bane and benefit to different cultures. McQuay explains.” One of the first infections a European got in North America was Captain James Cook coming down with a case of Poison Ivy. Native Americans used it, they had different ways to develop immunity,they would use the flexible vines to make baskets, in California they would smoke salmon with the skewers made from Poison Ivy.”

As nasty as it can be to the human species, McQuay says the exact opposite is true with many animals. ” Over sixty species of birds ingest the berries, Black Bears, White Tail Deer, rabbits and muskrat love to eat the seeds . Woodpeckers, warblers and thrushes relish the berries, so it is used by wildlife.”

Poison Ivy also is beneficial to the environment in other ways, so eradication is not feasible. Unfortunately, studies have found that due in part to climate change, the toxic oil that can cause so much damage is also becoming more potent. ” With the increased levels of carbons in the air, the Poison Ivy is becoming five percent stronger in Urishiol oil, which will cause the rash. McQuay continues ” Poison Ivy is definitely getting stronger as our environment changes and warms.”

All of this information is not meant to terrify, only to educate. As with much of our environment, knowledge goes far to keep from turning a hike in the woods to trip to the hospital. ” Learn to identify it, learn to avoid it like you would a poisonous snake, it shouldn’t stop you from going out there and enjoying the great outdoors, and be aware on sunny edges and stream banks and things it can grow there, and that’s a spot you really want to watch for it.”

See the original article here: 

Beware of Poison Ivy

Wordpress SEO Plugin by SEOPressor