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December 16, 2018

DC Comics women given retro makeovers for Bombshell Variant covers

DC Comics

‘ iconic female characters have been rendered in classic 1940s and ’50s pin-up style as part of the publisher’s Bombshell Variant promotion.

Artist Ant Lucia’s retro takes on Wonder Woman, Catwoman and Poison Ivy have been revealed ahead of their release in June.

The special variant covers will feature on 20 of DC’s best-selling titles that month, including

Action Comics

#32,

Detective Comics

#32 and

Green Lantern

#32.

DC Collectibles’ Bombshell Statue line served as the inspiration for the Bombshell covers.

“I’m so proud of the work we’ve accomplished on the Bombshell line and very excited to see them become part of the cover series,” Lucia told USA Today. “It has been a privilege to work with the team at DC Collectibles and watch these develop.”

She added: “Having my art on the cover of DC’s comic books has been a dream of mine since I was very young so this is particularly special to me.”

Link: 

DC Comics women given retro makeovers for Bombshell Variant covers

Ambler officials consider turning to goats to combat poison ivy problem in Borough Park

Officials in Ambler may have found a four-legged solution to a growing problem at one borough park.

During the May 7 borough council meeting, Mayor Jeanne Sorg offered a creative solution to combat the spreading poison ivy plants that are growing in a section of Borough Park behind Tennis Avenue along the banks of the Wissahickon Creek — hiring goats to eat them away.

The idea came about after council member Frank DeRuosi offered a status update on the borough’s parks and briefly mentioned the problem as one of a few minor issues that need to be addressed.

“The poison ivy thing is near and dear to my heart,” Sorg said. “Something to think about, I don’t know, because using chemicals is really the best way to get rid of [it], but a lot of people don’t want to use them, especially since we’re talking water here. The next best way is almost to do what Haverford College, and a lot of other institutions have done, which is, basically, hiring a goat herder and goats. Goats absolutely love [the plant]. Humans seem to be the only mammals that are allergic to it, my husband specifically. So I’m just throwing that out there; it’s something to think about.”

“No goats allowed in the park,” joked Borough Manager Mary Aversa. “No, I’m just kidding. What happened was the [Environmental Action Committee] did a project down there and they got this mulch brought in. It was covered in poison ivy. I think they’ve kept a handle on it, but [around] this season it gets really bad.”

The problem, according to one borough employee, was the plants grow too closely to the creek, making it too difficult to bring equipment in to get rid of them.

“People used to go down there to sit by the water,” said council member Sharon McCormick, “but now it’s unusable. The weeds grow nine feet sometimes in some spots. And the only thing that’s cleared is the trail.”

McCormick said the goal of the EAC’s project was to create what’s called a riparian buffer, which according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, is a vegetated area near a stream that protects waterways from being disturbed from harmful chemicals and other contaminants. Experts, though, told her it would take a team of about 25 people just to maintain the buffer on a regular basis.

“It’s so overgrown,” she said. “It’s so overgrown that I think a lot of those trees there have died from being strangled. We tried as best we could to help it, but it’s unmanageable and it’s unusable.”

Sorg said about a dozen goats can eat a quarter acre of poison ivy in a couple hours. Continued…

If Ambler were to try the unconventional approach of hiring livestock to act as natural weed mowers, it wouldn’t be the first.

Last summer, Upper Dublin Township hired sheep to eat their way through the overgrown grass and weeds at the detention basin behind the township building. The project cost the township about $300, mainly for a water trough.

Other reports of using sheep as eco-lawnmowers have come in from around the globe including places in Paris and at the Chicago International Airport.

Back in Ambler, Aversa said she’d like to look into companies that could get rid of the plants.

“We’ve even had an issue where we’ve had the guys try to do some work and they get poison ivy really bad,” she said. “Maybe we can look at a company to come in and just try and [get rid of the plants.] … Every time I send them out, I get three guys that get it. It’s bad.”

Sorg said the goats would be fenced in and would need to be sent in a number of times to permanently fix the problem.

“I think we’d have to do a lot of study on it,” Sorg said. “What I was reading was at Haverford, it’s $400 for each time they bring them in.”

Aversa said the borough would look in to it.

Vice President Peter Amento asked about what would happen when the goats “relieve themselves” while they’re out eating the plants.

A number of council members then chimed in laughing by saying “natural fertilizer.”

Follow Eric Devlin on Twitter @Eric_Devlin.

Officials in Ambler may have found a four-legged solution to a growing problem at one borough park.

During the May 7 borough council meeting, Mayor Jeanne Sorg offered a creative solution to combat the spreading poison ivy plants that are growing in a section of Borough Park behind Tennis Avenue along the banks of the Wissahickon Creek — hiring goats to eat them away.

The idea came about after council member Frank DeRuosi offered a status update on the borough’s parks and briefly mentioned the problem as one of a few minor issues that need to be addressed.

“The poison ivy thing is near and dear to my heart,” Sorg said. “Something to think about, I don’t know, because using chemicals is really the best way to get rid of [it], but a lot of people don’t want to use them, especially since we’re talking water here. The next best way is almost to do what Haverford College, and a lot of other institutions have done, which is, basically, hiring a goat herder and goats. Goats absolutely love [the plant]. Humans seem to be the only mammals that are allergic to it, my husband specifically. So I’m just throwing that out there; it’s something to think about.”

“No goats allowed in the park,” joked Borough Manager Mary Aversa. “No, I’m just kidding. What happened was the [Environmental Action Committee] did a project down there and they got this mulch brought in. It was covered in poison ivy. I think they’ve kept a handle on it, but [around] this season it gets really bad.”

The problem, according to one borough employee, was the plants grow too closely to the creek, making it too difficult to bring equipment in to get rid of them.

“People used to go down there to sit by the water,” said council member Sharon McCormick, “but now it’s unusable. The weeds grow nine feet sometimes in some spots. And the only thing that’s cleared is the trail.”

McCormick said the goal of the EAC’s project was to create what’s called a riparian buffer, which according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, is a vegetated area near a stream that protects waterways from being disturbed from harmful chemicals and other contaminants. Experts, though, told her it would take a team of about 25 people just to maintain the buffer on a regular basis.

“It’s so overgrown,” she said. “It’s so overgrown that I think a lot of those trees there have died from being strangled. We tried as best we could to help it, but it’s unmanageable and it’s unusable.”

Sorg said about a dozen goats can eat a quarter acre of poison ivy in a couple hours.

If Ambler were to try the unconventional approach of hiring livestock to act as natural weed mowers, it wouldn’t be the first. Last summer, Upper Dublin Township hired sheep to eat their way through the overgrown grass and weeds at the detention basin behind the township building. The project cost the township about $300, mainly for a water trough.

Other reports of using sheep as eco-lawnmowers have come in from around the globe including places in Paris and at the Chicago International Airport.

Back in Ambler, Aversa said she’d like to look into companies that could get rid of the plants.

“We’ve even had an issue where we’ve had the guys try to do some work and they get poison ivy really bad,” she said. “Maybe we can look at a company to come in and just try and [get rid of the plants.] … Every time I send them out, I get three guys that get it. It’s bad.”

Sorg said the goats would be fenced in and would need to be sent in a number of times to permanently fix the problem.

“I think we’d have to do a lot of study on it,” Sorg said. “What I was reading was at Haverford, it’s $400 for each time they bring them in.”

Aversa said the borough would look in to it.

Vice President Peter Amento asked about what would happen when the goats “relieve themselves” while they’re out eating the plants.

A number of council members then chimed in laughing by saying “natural fertilizer.”

Follow Eric Devlin on Twitter @Eric_Devlin.

Source article:  

Ambler officials consider turning to goats to combat poison ivy problem in Borough Park

Healthcheck: Dealing with poison ivy

Action News


Umar Mycka isn’t your average gardener.

“I’m a poison ivy horticulturalist,” he says, “a gardener who specializes in poison ivy removal.”

What Mycka does makes other cringe: wading into backyards and parks filled with the poisonous plant, and digging it out.

He says that while most people can identify its “leaves of three,” they don’t understand how it grows, so they get rashes over and over again.

For one thing, it takes root fast, and spreads quickly. A 2-year-old plant can have a 20-foot vine.

In one yard, a handful of sprigs above ground were hiding a 30-foot vine just below the soil.

“It was under the shrubs,” said Mycka, “under the English ivy. It was under pachysandra. Weed killer only killed the top leaves, not the vine below.”

About 85 percent of us have a reaction to the oil that’s on poison ivy’s leaves and vines.

“It does penetrate your skin,” says Mycka. “It goes into the lower layers of the skin, and it combines with a protein in the skin. You want to get that off before it happens.”

Mycka says you’ve got about 10 minutes to wash it off with lots of soap and water, or wipe it off with rubbing alcohol.

If you do get a rash, contrary to common belief, it won’t spread if you scratch those itchy blisters.

But it will be with you for awhile. It takes 8 days to peak before it diminishes.

Experts remind us that there is normally a boom in poison ivy cases over Memorial Day weekend so beware!

RELATED LINKS:

Umar Mycka’s website: idontwantpoisonivy.com

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Healthcheck: Dealing with poison ivy

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