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April 23, 2018

Calvin’s poison warning

Calvin Klein is apparently trying to deter nosy neighbours with warning signs about “poison ivy and ticks”.

The designer is reportedly determined to prevent interested passers-by from wandering around his $75 million property, which has been under construction for three years. During the summer, curious residents have been looking at the mansion in Southampton, New York, with some even driving past several times.

Insiders have told New York Post that signs have been erected outside the residence warning: “Caution, Poison Ivy and Ticks present: Do Not Enter.”

A representative for the fashion legend has explained Calvin is simply trying to protect his modern new home and ensure people stay safe.

“[Calvin Klein] has always had security at his houses over the years. Yes, there are signs warning of ticks because the deer are rampant out here and people are warning of late of the grave danger Lyme disease presents to anyone exposed,” the spokesman told the publication.

Calvin has also seemingly decided to beef up his security measures. He has hired a team of guards to patrol the grounds, with several men “in crisp white shirts and black pants” stationed at the end of his driveway.

In addition to the watchmen, cameras have also been set up in strategic positions around the estate.

One neighbour has described the minimalist glass and wood mansion as a “fortress”.

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Calvin’s poison warning

Poison Ivy: It's out there waiting for you

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Poison Ivy: It's out there waiting for you

Video: Poison parsnip: Worse than poison ivy

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Video: Poison parsnip: Worse than poison ivy

Poison Parsnip: Toxic And Invasive

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Poison Parsnip: Toxic And Invasive

Poison Parsnip

Poison Parsnip plants are toxic and invasive. They are also growing wild across the nation. The weeds are native to Asia and Europe. However, they are now common in nearly every US state.

Wild parsnip plants are usually found in areas where other common weeds thrive, including backyards. They are an invasive species that can spread rapidly and wipe out other plant species in the area. Even worse, the plant oils can cause health concerns.

As reported by The Poison Garden, poison parsnip can cause a blistering skin rash, similar to those caused by poison ivy. However, the rash produced by wild parsnip is usually more severe. The symptoms generally disappear after a few weeks, but may discolor the skin for months.

The plants share their name with edible parsnips, which are grown for food. Unlike the edible variety, wild parsnips should be avoided.

Wild parsnip plants can rapidly spread, taking over yards and flower beds. However, they can be eliminated from the yard through diligent care. As reported by FDL Reporter, the poison parsnips can be eliminated with herbicide application in the fall or spring.

Those who wish to avoid chemicals can keep the weeds cut at ground level or mowed. Gloves should always be worn when handling the plants to avoid an adverse reaction.

As discussed by the Vermont Department of Health, wild parsnips are green plants that produce tiny yellow flowers. They are similar in appearance to Queen Anne’s Lace.

They are closely related to carrots, and produce similar sized roots. The flowers do not appear until their second year of growth. Mature plants can reach up to four feet in height.

The health department suggests thoroughly washing with soap and water if skin comes into contact with the plants. As sunlight may trigger a reaction, avoiding sunlight for 48 hours may decrease the risk. If blisters form a doctor should be contacted.

Poison Parsnip

Clothes that come into contact with the plants should also be thoroughly washed as the oils may linger.

Poison parsnip can be toxic and is certainly invasive. However, with care, they can be avoided and eliminated, reducing the risks.

[Image via Wikimedia]


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Poison Parsnip: Toxic And Invasive

Things You Might Not Know About Poison Ivy

poison ivy.jpgJust the other day, a mother told me that her husband took the kids for a hike–through a whole bunch of poison ivy.

“So far, no rashes,” she said. “I keep checking.”

And she does need to keep checking–because the rash can show a week or longer later (usually with a first exposure), something this mom knew but lots of people don’t.

I’ve found that there are lots of other things that people don’t know about poison ivy. Here are a few:

There are different kinds of poison ivy–and it can look different at different times of year

. The adage “leaves of three, let them be” simply won’t keep you away from everything that can give you a poison ivy rash. The plants grow all over the US, so they are hard to avoid. The

Poison Ivy, Oak and Sumac Information Center

has lots of pictures.

You don’t have to touch it to get the rash. The toxin in the leaves, urushiol, escapes whenever the leaves are broken or bruised–and the toxin can get on things, like gloves, garden tools, and clothing. it can even get into the air if the stuff gets mowed or plowed. This is why…

You can get the rash from people or pets. If they have been the toxin on them, when you touch (or pet) them, you can get it too. Just to be clear: you can’t get the rash from someone’s rash–it’s not contagious that way. It’s the toxin from the plant that gives you the rash.

The best thing to do is to wash immediately. Take off any contaminated clothing, and wash with mild soap and water–as soon as you can. That’s the best thing you can do to get at least some of the urushiol off your skin, and make a reaction less likely. Remember to clean under nails, too.

There are various different rashes you can get from poison ivy. You can get bumps, scales, and various sizes of bubbles and blisters. Often they will be in a line or streak, showing where the plant touched the skin. However the rash looks, it’s usually red (although it can have black spots when the toxin stays on the skin and oxidizes)–and usually itches like crazy.

Treating the itch is all you usually need to do. Simple stuff, like oatmeal baths or cool compresses, can make a real difference. Anti-itch preparations that have menthol or phenol, like calamine, can also help–as can Burow’s solution or Domeboro. Interestingly, antihistamines like Benadryl don’t help all that much because of the way urushiol causes itching. Steroid creams may help if used early, but once there are any bubbles or blisters, they don’t help much.

Sometimes you need to take steroids–and if you do, you need to go off them slowly. In severe cases, taking steroids by mouth is needed–but if you do take them for just a few days, like we often prescribe in asthma, the rash can come back. So the recommendation is to lower the dose bit by bit over two or three weeks.

If you’re ever not sure about a rash, your doctor is your best resource. You should also call your doctor if a rash you think is poison ivy is on the face or genitals, is getting worse, gets very swollen or has pus coming out of it–and you should call if there is fever or the person with the rash seems ill.

Hope your summer is poison-ivy-free!

Is there something you’d like me to write about? Leave me a message on my Facebook page–and “like” the page for links to all my MD Mama blogs as well as my blogs on Thriving and Huffington Post.

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Things You Might Not Know About Poison Ivy

Outdoors Dan: Poison ivy can be cured with a product

Originally posted here – 

Outdoors Dan: Poison ivy can be cured with a product

Adam Sandler uncovers maid's poison ivy attack

Adam Sandler was recently horrified to discover his maid had been rubbing poison ivy all over his body as he slept as payback for having to handle the actor’s dirty underwear.

The Big Daddy star had no idea how he had contracted the itchy skin rash, and so he turned to his household security camera footage to ensure he wasn’t rummaging through his yard in his sleep.

And Sandler reveals he was shocked to discover who was responsible for all his discomfort.

He tells US TV host Jay Leno, “It was a horrific event. When you get that as a kid it makes sense, but a man my age, it doesn’t make too much sense because I don’t even go… in the woods… So I thought maybe I was sleep walking or something like that…

“The security camera in my house, I put it on me in my bed to see what I do, and a housekeeper kept coming in and rubbing poison ivy all over my body while I slept and I was like, ‘What the hell is going on? Why is this lady doing that to me?’ So I wake up in the morning, I said, ‘Hey, what’s the deal? It’s itchy, what you’re doing to me is wrong. I caught you. Why (did) you do that to me? I’m very nice to you.’

“She went to the laundry hamper and pulled out my underwear and (pointed to the stains) and she said, ‘That’s why’.”

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Adam Sandler uncovers maid's poison ivy attack

Adam Sandler's maid rubbed poison ivy on him as he slept

Adam Sandler was recently horrified to discover his maid had been rubbing poison ivy all over his body as he slept as payback for having to handle the actor’s dirty underwear.

The Big Daddy star had no idea how he had contracted the itchy skin rash, and so he turned to his household security camera footage to ensure he wasn’t rummaging through his yard in his sleep.

And Sandler reveals he was shocked to discover who was responsible for all his discomfort.

He tells TV host Jay Leno, “It was a horrific event. When you get that as a kid it makes sense, but a man my age, it doesn’t make too much sense because I don’t even go… in the woods… So I thought maybe I was sleep walking or something like that…

“The security camera in my house, I put it on me in my bed to see what I do, and a housekeeper kept coming in and rubbing poison ivy all over my body while I slept and I was like, ‘What the hell is going on? Why is this lady doing that to me?’ So I wake up in the morning, I said, ‘Hey, what’s the deal? It’s itchy, what you’re doing to me is wrong. I caught you. Why (did) you do that to me? I’m very nice to you.’

“She went to the laundry hamper and pulled out my underwear and (pointed to the stains) and she said, ‘That’s why’.”

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Adam Sandler's maid rubbed poison ivy on him as he slept

Preventing and treating poison ivy

poisonivy.jpg

Poison ivy is a native plant so it can’t be eradicated, but there are ways to get it out of your way for the season. (Courtesy of the USDA)

WASHINGTON – It’s the time of year when everyone starts heading outside. And it
is also the time of year when doctors see an uptick in poison ivy cases.

The plant itself is not seasonal. It grows year-round and poses a threat even in
the dead of winter.

However, people are more likely to come into contact with poison ivy when
gardening or
engaging in more active outdoor activities, such as hiking.

Poison ivy is a native plant, which means it will never be totally eradicated.
But WTOP Garden Editor Mike
McGrath says there is a safe way to get rid of it for the season.

He says herbicides are not a good option because even after application, the plant
is still allergenic to the
touch. He also warns that garden gloves should never be worn when removing poison
ivy because the oil in
the plant that causes a rash is easily spread from one surface to another.

“It’s going to be on doorknobs, it is going to be on car handles, it is going to
be on your steering wheel,” McGrath says.

Instead, he says get a big rolling trash can, a helper with a hose and a bunch of
thick plastic shopping bags
from the mall (McGrath says plastic bags from the supermarket are too thin).

“When you see a poison ivy vine, have your helper wet the soil around the base
using the hose. Let it go for
about 3 or 4 minutes until that soil is really saturated,” he says.

Once that is done, slip a plastic bag up each arm, and gently begin to pull out
the roots. McGrath says when
the final root comes out of the ground, pull the bags down over your arms without
touching the vine and
throw the bags and the vine in the trashcan.

Under no circumstance should anyone burn the vines with yard debris because the
oil in the plant mixes
with the smoke, McGrath advises. This mixture can be very dangerous if inhaled.

McGrath says firefighters dealing with wild fires routinely use respirators to
protect their lungs, and they
wear a clay-type compound to protect their bodies from any poison ivy allergens
that might get on their
gear.

That compound — Ivy Block — is available over-the-counter and is a good source
of extra prevention for
those who are extremely sensitive to poison ivy. McGrath says for most people, the
best thing to do is just
remember to rinse any exposed areas with cool water immediately after contact with
the vine.

“The more you wash it with cool, clear water, the better the chances you have of
getting the oil off your skin
before the reaction can begin,” he says, noting it takes 10-30 minutes for the oil
to penetrate the skin.

Washing the skin with cool water is key because it dissolves the oil.

Dr. Howard Brooks, a Georgetown-based dermatologist, says he urges his garden
warrior patients to
routinely take a cool shower after working outside, even if they are not sure they
have been exposed to
poison ivy.

However, if patients are exposed, he is ready with a plan of attack. Brooks says
most garden-variety poison
ivy can be treated at home first with cold compresses to reduce inflation,
followed by aloe vera, calamine
lotion or over-the-counter hydrocortisone.

Severe cases demand medical attention, especially when on the face.

“Any infection on the face, around the mouth, nose, if you have swollen eyes,
swollen skin and blistering,
you really want to go in and see a dermatologist,” Brooks says.

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Preventing and treating poison ivy

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