_ap_ufes{"success":true,"siteUrl":"howtotreatpoisonivy.com","urls":{"Home":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com","Category":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/category/poison-ivy-news/","Archive":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/2015/04/","Post":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/go-ahead-little-goat-eat-some-poison-ivy-it-wont-hurt-a-bit/","Page":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/5-myths-treating-poison-ivy-rashes/","Nav_menu_item":"http://howtotreatpoisonivy.com/96/"}}_ap_ufee

December 13, 2017

Archives for August 2014

Humane Society: Poison ivy affects pets, too

After such a prolonged heat wave, the cooler temperatures have made the morning dog walk a lot more enjoyable.

And, it’s a reminder that autumn will be here in no time. The cooler weather also makes us think more about working in the garden, hiking and even camping.

These are activities where we can be exposed to poison oak and poison ivy. Have you ever wondered if our pets can get poison ivy if they come across it during a hike or other outdoor excursion?

Fact is that they can. Thankfully though, dogs don’t seem to get poison ivy nearly as commonly as humans. Their long, protective coats prevent the oils from poison ivy from reaching their skin. Unfortunately, however, the plant oils that cause the itching and irritation that often produce a painful rash can be spread from your canine friend to you. So if your dog “works” in the garden with you or accompanies you on a hike, keep this in mind.

Since our dogs and cats aren’t likely to become contaminated themselves and therefore do not alert us to possible exposure, what should we do to help prevent them from inadvertently transmitting poison ivy to us?

• Try to avoid petting your pet if you suspect poison ivy may be growing in the area and that your pet may have unwittingly found it when exploring. Using a towel to dry wipe him or her can significantly reduce the likelihood of transmission to you.

• Avoid touching your face and wash your hands.

• As soon as possible, take a shower. The plant oil from poison ivy or oak can linger on your own skin.

• Wash the clothes you were wearing. The chemical in the plant oil can stay active for a long time, and it doesn’t require a host.

• Wash your pet’s leash and harness with a mild detergent (make sure you handle the pet gear with gloves).

• Give your dog a bath to reduce the likelihood that poison ivy will find its way into your home.

Even if you don’t suspect poison ivy, toweling off and examining your dog is a good idea as ticks can also hitch a ride. Though monthly preventatives for fleas and ticks will protect your dog, you are still vulnerable. Ticks can carry human diseases, including the very serious Lyme disease.

Outdoor activities with your best friend can be fun. Awareness of some of the risks involved, and how to avoid them, can ensure that the entire experience will be a rewarding one.

Lynn Gensamer is the executive director of Humane Society for Greater Savannah. She can be reached by phone at 912-354-9515, ext. 105, or by email at lgensamer@humanesocietysav.org.

More:

Humane Society: Poison ivy affects pets, too

Leaves of three, let it be

Leaves of three, let it be

Time to call Poison Ivy Gone

Published Aug 28, 2014 at 9:35 pm
(Updated Aug 28, 2014)

Make text smallerMake text larger

Photos

  • Poison Ivy

  • Poison Ivy Gone workers dig up the plants and remove them.

  • The van says it all.

Things you may not know about poison ivy – but should
Urushiol (u-ROO-she-ol), the culprit in poison ivy, is found in leaves, stems and roots of the plant.
Three out of four people who come in contact with urushiol will develop a rash, an allergic dermatitis.
The first contact with urushiol often does not cause a reaction. However, the immune system goes on the defense and the next contact will result in an allergic reaction.
Skin must come in direct contact with the oil to be affected but it can be spread by contaminated hands, clothing, tools, sporting equipment, etc. The contamination can last for five years. The blister fluid does not spread the rash.
Symptoms, 12-48 hours after exposure: redness, itching, swelling, streaky or patchy rash, red bumps, blisters, sometimes oozing. Typically lasts 5-12 days, 30 days or longer in severe cases.
Medical attention is needed if there is a rash on face, lips, eyes or genitals, severe swelling, difficulty in breathing or a widespread reaction.
Never burn poison ivy. While the oil cannot be inhaled from the plant, burning results in toxic smoke that can cause a serious reaction in the lungs, nasal passages and throat.
Urushiol oil remains in the stems of poison ivy for years after the plant dies.
To prevent infection after contact, shower in cool water as soon as possible. Wash toys and tools in soap and cold water.

BY GINNY RAUE
You went to sleep fine last night but woke up this morning with blisters and itching skin. Sure, you were weeding yesterday but you had on your garden gloves. So how did you get poison ivy?

According to George Louvis, the marketing director for Poison Ivy Gone, your cloth gloves act like a sponge, absorbing the urushiol oil in poison ivy, increasing the amount of oil that comes in contact with your skin and making your allergic reaction even worse.

Poison Ivy Gone
Oakland, New Jersey
Free estimates available
973-790-3638
http://www.poisonivygone.com
Business hours: Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Closed Sat. and Sun.

Based in Oakland, Poison Ivy Gone has over 28 years of experience in professionally removing poison ivy in Northern New Jersey but they have also worked in Orange and Rockland counties, Pennsylvania and South Jersey. They service residential and commercial properties as well as others sites, such as country clubs, playgrounds and schools. They are Service Award winners on Angie’s List.

“She comes on like a rose, but everybody knows, she’ll get you in Dutch….”

Louvis reports that poison ivy starts to grow in the spring and he said this year’s weather conditions created the perfect storm.

“It’s a weed, so there’s not much that stops its growth. It’s a vicious and invasive plant and it doesn’t take a lot for it to take over,” he said.

Poison ivy can grow anywhere but usually pops up around the borders of your property or near the house. It roots well in mulch, flower beds and woods, where there is little activity, and tends to shoot off in many directions.

“It’s very aggressive and it spreads in two ways; along the ground, where it gets longer and bigger and then every so often it shoots vertical. That’s when it reproduces and drops seeds. When it starts climbing it’s getting ready to have babies,” he said.

Your dog can take a walk on the wild side in poison ivy and suffer no ill effects, but once you pet your furry friend, who carries the oil on his coat, you’re in trouble. Backyard birds are also culprits in the itchy world of poison ivy. They ingest the berries of the plant and as they do a fly-over they pass the seeds, perfectly encased in their own little sack of fertilizer. No harm intended, but now you are in deep doo-doo and have a good chance of becoming a host property for poison ivy.

“You can look but you’d better not touch….”

Attempting to eliminate poison ivy with a lawn mower or weed whacker only succeeds in spreading the oil on the grass, in the bushes, on your shoes and pant legs. Your tools are also contaminated for the next five years unless they are properly cleaned. And it gets worse.

“When your kids play in the yard the oil is all over the lawn,” Louvis said.

“She’s pretty as a daisy, but look out man, she’s crazy….”

Poison ivy is easiest to identify from April to October. It goes dormant after the fall, but doesn’t die and you can still get a rash in the dead of winter. While the leaves remain is the best time to call Poison Ivy Gone.

“It’s never a do-it-yourself job. Our guys recognize it, figure out where it’s coming from, remove it completely and show you how to keep it from coming back,” Louvis said.

Poison Ivy Gone’s preferred method is to remove it by hand, just beneath ground level, or in the case of significant infestation, by machine.

Sometimes customers prefer the use of an herbicide to protect certain plants from harm. In that case, Poison Ivy Gone technicians use a paint brush to apply the herbicide to the poison ivy leaves, killing off the noxious plant only.

“They are skilled and careful and we are licensed to use herbicides,” Louvis said.

“You’re gonna need an ocean of calamine lotion….”

Poison Ivy Gone technicians know how to protect themselves so they’re not scratching like a hound the minute they mess around with poison ivy.

“The guys are basically in haz-mat suits. They take an oral product and use a cream on their skin. The suits are destroyed afterwards; you can’t re-use anything in this business,” Louvis said.

Poison Ivy Gone removes the poison ivy from the ground then carts it away from your property to a secure location.

And then the Poison Ivy is Gone.

Sources: http://lyricksfreak.com – “Poison Ivy” by the Coasters, 1959; http://www.mayoclinic.org; http://my.clevelandclinic.org;

Make text smallerMake text larger


Comments

Pool Rules

Continue reading: 

Leaves of three, let it be

Do you recognize this mystery plant?

Poison ivy isn’t “evil.” Neither are spiders or hurricanes.

Some plants do cause problems, of course. Poison ivy is a “problem” plant for humans in that it causes lots of people to break out in allergic reactions, sometimes severely.

Yet poison ivy is in fact a widespread native species, providing wildlife food for a variety of critters. It is a common component of many natural ecosystems and has been here in our landscapes a lot longer than we humans have.

On the other hand, there are some plants that have not been around very long, relatively speaking. These are the weeds.

Some weeds are rather innocuous, rarely causing problems. But then other weeds are ravenously destructive, showing up in our lawns, gardens, agricultural fields, just about anywhere.

The thing we should remember about weeds, whether benign or destructive, is that nearly all of them have been introduced by humans into a previously weed-free environment. You might think of these introduced species as “guests,” sometimes invited intentionally, sometimes not. The problem with guests, of course, is that sometimes they stay too long.

And then there is our mystery plant.

It is a gorgeous herb, capable of producing masses of beautiful foliage. The sheathing, pointed leaves are produced on flimsy, fleshy stems that flop over and make new roots. I’ve seen some of these plants producing brightly variegated leaves, striped with yellow.

Flowering occurs in the autumn, until frost. Usually, a single flower will pop up at the end of a stem or in a leaf axil. Each flower is about half an inch wide, with three white or pink petals. Small pods form afterward, containing little seeds.

This is a species that occurs naturally in much of southern Asia, from India to Korea and Japan. Here’s the scary thing: It is now a common component of wetland systems in North America, and is surely present in every Southeastern state. It is also known now as a weed in Oregon and Washington.

For a number of years, botanists knew of it in the South only from the coastal plain, but more recently it has invaded piedmont and mountain settings. It is notorious for rampant growth, crowding out everything around it, and it is definitely invasive. How did it arrive?

One theory is that seeds of this plant were introduced — accidentally — into South Carolina late in the 17th century, contaminating rice seed. According to this idea, this species remained confined to rice fields of South Carolina, and then elsewhere in the Southeast, until relatively recently, and then for whatever reasons, it has taken on a new and more threatening behavior, easily spreading into new habitats.

Waterfowl, which like to eat the seeds, are implicated in this spread. The stems root with such ease that it is no surprise fragments of the plants could easily start up after being transported somewhere else.

Although it isn’t “evil”, this plant guest has gained a nasty reputation. And it doesn’t look like it

wants to leave any time soon.

John Nelson is the curator of the A. C. Moore Herbarium at the University of South Carolina, in the Department of Biological Sciences. As a public service, the herbarium offers free plant identifications. For more information, visit www.herbarium.org, call 803-777-8196 or email nelson@sc.edu.

Answer: “Nasty-weed,” “Asiatic dew-flower,” Murdannia keisak

Source:

Do you recognize this mystery plant?

Wild Moments: How to spot poison ivy

There’s a monster in the woods this time of year. It’s big, green and hairy – and it’s waiting patiently for you: Poison Ivy.

VIDEO: How to spot poison ivy

PHOTOS: Scenes from Shenk’s Ferry Wildflower Preserve 

LEARN MORE: Things you never knew about Pa.’s native plants

Tim Draude of the Muhlenberg Botanical Society is one of those rare individuals who is not allergic to poison ivy. He also has some tips on how to spot the plant before you come in contact with it.

Tips on how to spot poison ivy:

– Look for 3 shiny leaves

– Poison ivy has tiny greenish-white flowers

– Later in the season, white berries sprout from the plant

Although it’s a vine, the plant doesn’t necessarily climb trees. You can get poison ivy from the leaves, stems, or roots. Also, you don’t have to come in direct contact with the plant to get poison ivy. Pets that run through a patch of poison ivy can also bring it into your home.

Photos: Scenes from Shenk’s Ferry Wildflower Preserve





1 of 31

Meg Frankowski/WGAL

Shenk’s Ferry Wildflower Preserve, located along the Susquehanna River, is one of the region’s premier locations to observe native Pennsylvania plant life.

Previous


Next


Read more: 

Wild Moments: How to spot poison ivy

Report: Mosquitoes, poison ivy to grow with climate change

Report: Mosquitoes, poison ivy to grow with climate change

“;
document.getElementById(‘premiumMsg’).innerHTML = contentStr;
document.getElementById(‘premiumMsg’).style.display = “block”;
} else if (userSingleSale == “Reguser”)
contentStr = “

” + userStoriesViewed + ” of 10 clicks used this month


UPGRADEyour account for full access to SouthCoastToday.com

“;
document.getElementById(‘premiumMsg’).innerHTML = contentStr;
document.getElementById(‘premiumMsg’).style.display = “block”;
else if (userSingleSale == “PREMIUM01”)
document.getElementById(‘premiumMsg’).style.display = “none”;

August 22, 2014 12:00 AM

There’s bad news for nature lovers this week: The most annoying outdoor bugs and pests will only get peskier and more prevalent with climate change.

Tiger mosquitoes, poison ivy, deer ticks and fire ants will all be conquering new ground and expanding their range as temperatures rise with global warming, according to a report released this week from the National Wildlife Federation called “Ticked off: America’s outdoor experience and climate change.”

On SouthCoast the pest that is most concerning is the tiger mosquito, said Dr. Doug Inkley, who authored the report.

Tiger mosquitoes can carry 30 different types of diseases, including West Nile Virus, EEE and Dengue fever, among others. Unlike many species of mosquitoes which are mostly active at dusk and dawn, tiger mosquitoes are active all day long, posing a particular threat to humans.

Currently, tiger mosquitoes, an invasive species from Asia, are present in southeastern Pennsylvania and the “very coastal areas” of Connecticut and Rhode Island.

By 2020, that will change thanks to global warming, Inkley said. By 2020 tiger mosquitoes could be present in all of coastal Massachusetts as rising temperatures encourage them to come north.

“Basically this host species, which carries diseases, is going to be out there all day, greatly increasing the exposure risk to humans,” Inkley said.

Just because a warmer climate will be favorable to tiger mosquitoes does not mean it will be favorable for all 30 of the diseases they can carry.

Still, Inkley said there is a cause for concern.

Another pest that will impact SouthCoast is poison ivy. Like all plants, poison ivy thrives when there is more carbon dioxide, a symptom of global warming. Poison ivy can also thrive in a warmer environment, meaning the plant will become more prevalent.

Perhaps more concerning, however, is that the combination of added heat and carbon dioxide will also increase the toxicity of urushiol, the part of poison ivy that causes allergic reactions in humans.

“This report shows that there are significant pests that we do deal with now but that we will have to take more effort to deal with in the future,” Inkley said.

He said he did not want the report to discourage people from spending time outdoors, noting that “the outdoor experience is so important to children and their health.”

But, he said, unless public policy changes so that the amount of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere decreases significantly, people will have to be much more vigilant when they are outside.

“We already know how to protect ourselves by wearing long clothing, and we should continue to do that,” he said. “But we also need to cut our carbon emissions and invest in renewable energy.”

Follow Ariel Wittenberg on Twitter at @awittenberg_SCT


We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Rules. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or fill out this form. New comments are only accepted for two weeks from the date of publication.

Original post: 

Report: Mosquitoes, poison ivy to grow with climate change

Garden Variety: Tougher poison ivy

Can poison ivy really get any worse?

If you have ever had a reaction to the plant, just the inscribed memory of endless itching might make you doubtful that anything could rival it. For gardeners and outdoor enthusiasts who regularly encounter poison ivy, however, the rumors that the plant is becoming more abundant are starting to look true.

The news about poison ivy (Toxicodendron taxa) is more than rumor, but if you heard it from a friend, it would be easy to put it in a box with old wives’ tales and snake oils. Research at Duke University in the early 2000s started the discussion when the results of a six-year study on the relationship between poison ivy and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide were released.

The bottom line from the report’s abstract reads: “Our results indicate that Toxicodendron taxa will become more abundant and more ‘toxic’ in the future, potentially affecting global forest dynamics and human health.”

In the study, when atmospheric carbon dioxide increased in a forest, poison ivy was able to photosynthesize better and use water more efficiently, making it grow faster and larger than it would otherwise. In addition, the urushiol (the oil responsible for skin irritation) produced by these plants was more allergenic than in plants at normal atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.

Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide is related to growth stimulation in other species of plants also, but the rate of increase in poison ivy is higher than most and will help the plant outcompete others as carbon dioxide levels increase.

Unfortunately, little can be done to stop poison ivy besides avoidance and controlling it on your own property. Learn to recognize the plant, characterized by compound leaves with three leaflets. Poison ivy can be a vine, a shrub or something that looks like a perennial groundcover with single leaves coming out of the ground. Along the Kansas River north of Lawrence, large patches of waist-high poison ivy are easy to find. By mid-to-late summer the leaves often have reddish spots on them that make them easier to recognize.

If you encounter poison ivy, avoid touching any part of the plant or contacting it with tools or clothing. Urushiol, the oil produced by the plant, can be carried on objects and cause a reaction later through indirect contact. Urushiol can also be inhaled if poison ivy plants are burned.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 80 to 90 percent of humans are allergic to urushiol, but allergies can develop for those who think they are immune. Urushiol reactions are characterized by itchy red bumps, patches and weeping blisters.

— Jennifer Smith is a former horticulture extension agent for K-State Research and Extension and horticulturist for Lawrence Parks and Recreation. She is the host of “The Garden Show” and has been a gardener since childhood. Send your gardening questions and feedback to Lawrence Living@ljworld.com.

Lawrence Journal-World.

All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
We strive to uphold our values for every story published.

Read this article: 

Garden Variety: Tougher poison ivy

Angie's List Report: Identifying Poison Ivy, Oak and Sumac

(WDEF) Homeowner Shirley Branham loves tending to her yard and garden, but she can’t seem to escape the itchy wrath of poison ivy.

She said, “I usually just noticed one or two little dots which eventually unfortunately then spread all the way up my arm or on my legs.”

The key to avoiding a rash like Shirley’s is knowing how to spot these poisonous plants.

Poison ivy grows in all areas of the continental U-S.

Poison oak is most common on the West Coast, but it’s also found in Southeastern states.

And poison sumac grows in swampy areas of the Southeast.

Emily Wood works as a horticulturist. She said, “Poison oak and poison ivy look fairly similar, but poison sumac has much more leaflets, more leaves on the leaflet.”

Birds often feed on the berries of these plants and consequently spread the seeds, so look for the plants in areas where birds hang out – on or under trees or near fences.

Angie’s List researchers found many lawn care companies won’t go near these plants, but there are some that do specialize in removal.

Angie Hicks of Angie’s List said, “During the hiring process be sure to cover how the company is going to tackle the problem. Are they going to use chemicals to remove the plants? Are they going to dig the plants up? How long do they guarantee their work? Will they come back if the plant reappears? Also, don’t forget these plants like to spread so if the plant is in your neighbor’s yard you want to understand that problem as well.”

You may be able to tackle smaller plants on your own, but be sure to wear protective clothing and know how to properly dispose.

Wood added, “Most of the time it’s probably best to put it in a plastic bag and throw it away, but keep in mind, that anything that touches it will carry the oil and you can get the contact dermatitis from the oil.”

You should never burn these plants or use a weed eater or lawn mower to get rid of them – you’ll just distribute the oil.

Excerpt from: 

Angie's List Report: Identifying Poison Ivy, Oak and Sumac

‘Gotham’ Extended Trailer Features the Penguin, Catwoman, Poison Ivy and the Riddler Before They Were Famous (Video)