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December 13, 2017

Archives for July 2014

Bad Summer for Poison Ivy

JOPLIN, Mo. — More of us have been outside in the cooler summer in the Ozarks. And that means more of us are encountering a plant that is causing a lot of people trouble this year.

“It’s not fun at all. It itches. It’s hard to sleep when you’re itching,” said Kelli Craigin who suffers from poison ivy.

85% of people in Southwest Missouri will be affected by the three leaf poison ivy plant at some point in their life.

“It can be growing in your flower beds because you won’t even think about it until after you’ve been affected by it,” said Verna Simkins, Missouri Extension.

Poison ivy is found as a shrub or vine in forests, gardens, and along streams.

“Either one has the chemical called Urushiol, which is the poison that causes the irritation and that is so potent that the amount that it takes to cover the head of a pen can cause a rash in 500 people,” said Simkins.

You can get poison ivy by walking through it, touching it, and pulling it.

“Or you can get it even from your dog, if he’s gone through the bushes. Or if you don’t wash your clothes and shoes and gloves immediately, you can be re-infected from a previous contamination,” said Simkins.

You can get a poison ivy rash or skin irritation at any age. Kelli Cragin didn’t display any poison ivy symptoms until she turned 50-years-old.

“I all of a sudden, I started getting a rash and then it just started spreading. And went to the doctor because it just started spreading fast. They told me that it was poison ivy,” said Craigin.

Poison ivy’s cousin, poison oak, has the same symptoms as ivy, but it’s not commonly found in the Southwest Missouri area. Experts say to remember the rule, “leaves of three, let them be.”

(KODE, Joplin)

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Bad Summer for Poison Ivy

Boston enlists goats to combat poison ivy – News, Weather and Classifieds for Southern New England

The city of Boston is enlisting goats to combat poison ivy and other invasive plants in a city park.The city of Boston is enlisting goats to combat poison ivy and other invasive plants in a city park.

BOSTON –

Boston is enlisting goats to combat poison ivy and other invasive plants in a city park.

On Wednesday, four goats began their eight-week stay at an “urban wild” along the Neponset River in the city’s Hyde Park neighborhood.

The goats are expected to feed on poison ivy, buckthorn, Japanese knotweed, and other invasive plant species.

Mayor Martin Walsh’s administration says the public can view the goats, which will be housed behind a low-voltage, solar-powered electric fence to keep coyotes out. But city officials warn visitors should not pet the animals since they will likely have poison ivy oils on their fur.

The city says “goatscaping” is currently used on Boston’s Harbor Islands as well as in Chicago, Los Angeles, and Washington, D.C.

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Boston enlists goats to combat poison ivy – News, Weather and Classifieds for Southern New England

Teens create 'goatscaping' venture to clear park's poison ivy

A group of Boston teens are monitoring a team of goats to clean up poison ivy in a city park. (Sourece: WCVB/CNN)A group of Boston teens are monitoring a team of goats to clean up poison ivy in a city park. (Sourece: WCVB/CNN)

BOSTON (WCVB/CNN) – Boston is enlisting the aid of some four-legged helpers to combat the city’s nastiest weed problems.

They’re out to make Boston a nicer place to live, one chomp at a time.

“We actually have goats right now at this very moment eating poison ivy and hopefully this will open up this space to be more accessible green area,” interim parks Commissioner Chris Cook said.

“Goatscaping” is underway by the Neponset River in Hyde Park. It’s an area Boston city maintenance groups and volunteers can’t access because it’s overrun by poison ivy.

Apparently the poison ivy is a delicacy for the four goats who just arrived to the park. The “goatscaping” will go on for eight weeks, and they have a lot of work to do.

Grant money will cover the $3,000 costs, and teens in the Hyde Park Green Team helped convince Boston’s mayor it was a good idea.

“We proposed our idea of having goats and he thought it was pretty cool b/c it was the first time in Boston,” Jolanda Douyon of the Hyde Park Green Team said.

The Green Team will help care for the four-legged helpers during their stay at the West Street Urban Wild.

“The ‘goatscaping’ company will fence in a half-acre at a time with an electrified fence that is solar powered. It’s not harmful to humans. It’s really meant to keep coyotes out and goats in,” said Patricia Alverez of Southwest Boston Community Development Corporation.

The city says it’s fine for the public to view the goats, but don’t pet them – they’re covered in poison ivy oils.

According to the Boston Globe, the $2,800 cost to rent the goats is being covered by grants.

Copyright 2014 WCVB via CNN. All rights reserved.

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Teens create 'goatscaping' venture to clear park's poison ivy

Boston Enlists Goats To Combat Poison Ivy

BOSTON — Boston is enlisting goats to combat poison ivy and other invasive plants in a city park.

On Wednesday, four goats began their eight-week stay at an “urban wild” along the Neponset River in the city’s Hyde Park neighborhood.

The goats are expected to feed on poison ivy, buckthorn, Japanese knotweed, and other invasive plant species.

Mayor Martin Walsh’s administration says the public can view the goats, which will be housed behind a low-voltage, solar-powered electric fence to keep coyotes out. But city officials warn visitors should not pet the animals since they will likely have poison ivy oils on their fur.

The city says “goatscaping” is currently used on Boston’s Harbor Islands as well as in Chicago, Los Angeles, and Washington, D.C.

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Boston Enlists Goats To Combat Poison Ivy

Goats Are Eating Our Poison Ivy, For the Children




An overgrown Hyde Park lot is becoming dinner for some lucky—and hopefully hungry—farm animals: goats are being brought in to eat the poison ivy that has taken over the space.

Southwest Boston Community Development Corporation’s Patricia Alvarez told WBZ that West Street Urban Wild had “so much poison ivy, it is unsafe for the youths.”

But it is safe for goats, Alvarez said. In fact, “they love it. It’s like candy.” Yum!


The goats are being provided by a Plymouth company that specializes in hungry goat rentals as an alternative to doing the yard work yourself or using chemicals, according to Boston Magazine. For the next eight weeks, four goats will be fenced in the lot and allowed to go to town on the toxic (to us) treats. Anyone may stop by to watch the goats in action, but visitors are being asked not to pet the goats, and especially not to feed them. They have work to do.

NECN noted that after eating the plants, the goats will “deposit a clean natural fertilizer back into the landscape.” So while your kids won’t be rolling in poison ivy, they might come in contact with a little bit of goat poop.

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Goats Are Eating Our Poison Ivy, For the Children

Boston Using Goats To Clear Poison Ivy