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May 20, 2018

Archives for June 2014

Home Health House Calls: Poison Ivy and Oak

Poison Ivy and Oak-

Welcome to Home Health House Calls.

Poison Ivy and poison Oak are types of plants that cause Skin rashes.
These plants contain a type of sap oil.
If you’re allergic to this oil, touching one of these plants may cause your skin to react. Within minutes or days, you may have a red, swollen, itchy rash.
You can help prevent a poison oak or poison ivy rash.
Know what these plants look like And then avoid them.
They grow in the form of vines, small plants, and large bushes.
In most cases, poison oak and poison ivy have three leaves per stem.
Watch out for these plants when you go to any outdoor area.
Avoid touching either of these plants.
When heading outdoors Wear long pants and a long-sleeved shirt If you are going to a heavily wooded or brushy area.
You should also wear gloves when working outside.
If you are exposed to one of these plants and are allergic Y

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Home Health House Calls: Poison Ivy and Oak

GPM Pediatrics physician provides treatment, prevention tips on poison ivy

GPM Pediatrics physician provides treatment, prevention tips on poison ivy

Published on June 5, 2014 at 8:32 AM

Dr. Michael Gabriel, a Staten Island Pediatrician, provides advice on how to avoid poison ivy plants, and treat or prevent rashes.

According to an article published by KidsHealth.org, poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac all contain the same oily substance that causes rashes, urushiol. Recognizing oily plants during different parts of the year is important since they can look different depending on the season. Poison ivy can often be red during the spring, green during the summer and brown during the fall.

An allergic reaction to poisonous plants occurs for 60-80 percent of people within hours or as late as 5 days after coming in contact with a plant. Often time’s poison ivy can be prevented, according to the article. Avoiding areas where poison ivy is present is the key way in preventing poison ivy rashes, along with learning to identify plants, and wearing proper clothing when engaging in outdoor activity.

Dr. Michael Gabriel of GPM Pediatrics, a Staten Island pediatrics center, says that poison ivy season is in full swing. “Poison ivy can be very dangerous for children, especially because they have very sensitive skin. I advise parents to teach their children how to identify poisonous plants and the risks associated with them.” Gabriel urges parents to have their children shower after outdoor activity near plants but not to give baths. “Giving a bath can spread the oils around the tub and can make the condition worse.”

Dr. Gabriel says that once poison ivy is contracted, it is very difficult to get rid of and can be uncomfortable. “Calmine lotion is popular but has mixed results. If the condition gets severe for your child you must contact your local pediatrician to get the proper treatment,” Gabriel explains. “Be aware of any outdoor pets that your family has as well. Dogs often rub up against poison ivy and the oils can transfer to your kids.”

SOURCE GPM Pediatrics

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GPM Pediatrics physician provides treatment, prevention tips on poison ivy

Staten Island Pediatrician Offers Treatment and Prevention Tips on Poison Ivy

BOHEMIA, N.Y., June 5, 2014 /PRNewswire-iReach/ — Dr. Michael Gabriel, a Staten Island Pediatrician, provides advice on how to avoid poison ivy plants, and treat or prevent rashes.

Photo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140604/94471

According to an article published by KidsHealth.org, poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac all contain the same oily substance that causes rashes, urushiol. Recognizing oily plants during different parts of the year is important since they can look different depending on the season. Poison ivy can often be red during the spring, green during the summer and brown during the fall.

An allergic reaction to poisonous plants occurs for 60-80 percent of people within hours or as late as 5 days after coming in contact with a plant. Often time’s poison ivy can be prevented, according to the article. Avoiding areas where poison ivy is present is the key way in preventing poison ivy rashes, along with learning to identify plants, and wearing proper clothing when engaging in outdoor activity.

Dr. Michael Gabriel of GPM Pediatrics, a Staten Island pediatrics center, says that poison ivy season is in full swing. “Poison ivy can be very dangerous for children, especially because they have very sensitive skin. I advise parents to teach their children how to identify poisonous plants and the risks associated with them.” Gabriel urges parents to have their children shower after outdoor activity near plants but not to give baths. “Giving a bath can spread the oils around the tub and can make the condition worse.”

Dr. Gabriel says that once poison ivy is contracted, it is very difficult to get rid of and can be uncomfortable. “Calmine lotion is popular but has mixed results. If the condition gets severe for your child you must contact your local pediatrician to get the proper treatment,” Gabriel explains. “Be aware of any outdoor pets that your family has as well. Dogs often rub up against poison ivy and the oils can transfer to your kids.”

GPM Pediatrics provides comprehensive pediatric care to children throughout the New York area with practices both in Brooklyn and Staten Island. Our board certified pediatricians and experienced staff help provide a very warm and nurturing environment for both you and your children. Our approach combines the latest treatment methods with the personal attention you should expect from your doctor. Simply put, we understand the importance of communication and trust and we are earning that trust one family at a time.

Media Contact: Scott Darrohn, GPM Pediatrics, 855-347-4228, takara@fishbat.com

News distributed by PR Newswire iReach: https://ireach.prnewswire.com

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Staten Island Pediatrician Offers Treatment and Prevention Tips on Poison Ivy

Poison ivy: how to identify and kill it without damaging other plants

QUESTION: What’s the best way to get rid of poison ivy? I have it in two locations. The first is in low-growing ligustrums that border my yard, and the second is along my backyard fence. — Dave Plank

ANSWER: Anyone cleaning out overgrown areas or weeding should beware. Poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) may be growing among the plants. Gardeners often come into contact with poison ivy and many contract a bothersome rash as a result. It pays to be able to identify and avoid it.

The plant has a characteristic compound leaf consisting of three leaflets (Hence the saying, “Leaves of three, let it be”). The leaflets are 2 to 4 inches long and dull or glossy green with pointed tips. The middle leaflet is generally larger than the two laterals.

The margins of the leaflets are variable, appearing irregularly toothed, lobed or smooth. The leaves are arranged alternately on the stems. Young foliage often is shiny or oily looking with a reddish tint.

One way to control poison ivy is to spray the foliage with a systemic herbicide. This is only possible when the spray will not get on the foliage of desirable plants (these herbicides will damage any plant).

This should work well on your back fence. If needed, cover desirable plants with plastic sheets or bags to protect them while you spray. Be sure to wet the poison ivy foliage thoroughly with the herbicide solution.

Glyphosate (Roundup, Eraser, Killzall, and other brands) or triclopyr (Brush-B-Gon, Brush Killer and other brands) are commonly recommended for poison ivy control. Herbicides that contain a combination of dicamba (banvel) and 2,4-D also work well.

The dead leaves can still cause rashes and should be handled cautiously with gloves.

For poison ivy vines growing in trees or intertwined in shrubs, such as in your ligustrum hedge, try this method: Cut off each poison ivy vine a few inches from the ground with loppers or hand pruners and immediately treat the fresh-cut stump with undiluted triclopyr (Green Light Cut Vine and Stump Killer and other brands). The cut vine will die because it has no root system. The treated stump will die because the herbicide gets absorbed and translocates to the roots. This method is effective and may be used any time of the year.

Getting poison ivy off your property will take repeated herbicide applications. Older vines in neighboring yards may continue to drop seeds in your landscape. Watch out for this unwelcome plant and be prompt and aggressive in your efforts to control it.

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Poison ivy: how to identify and kill it without damaging other plants

Prevention and treatment options for bug bites and poison ivy this summer

With the summertime, comes increased outdoor activity, as well as increased exposure to things such as poison ivy and bug bites.

The majority of Americans are allergic to poison ivy; however, there are things we can do to prevent it from coming into contact with our skin, such as:

1. Knowing how to identify the plant – poison ivy has a cluster of three leaves at the end of a long stem. Hairy vines that you often see growing up the side of trees are also poison ivy.

2. Wearing gloves, long sleeves and pants if you are working outside, and washing them immediately after use.

Bug bites can also be quite the nuisance, and in some cases, quite dangerous. Tick bites, in particular, can cause serious health conditions such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever and Lyme disease.

To prevent tick bites, wear bug repellent spray containing at least 25 percent DEET when spending time outdoors.

In most cases, bug bites and poison ivy rashes can be treated at home using cold compresses and/or hydrocortisone cream to help with the itching.

However, if a rash from poison ivy lasts more than three weeks or if you begin experiencing high fever, achiness, a rash, fatigue and/or headache within a month of a tick bite, you need to seek medical attention.

Fortunately, Cone Health has an exceptional network of urgent care facilities throughout the area, from Kernersville to Mebane, dedicated to providing proper treatment to patients who have experienced a common summertime injury or health condition.

Spokesperson Background:
Dr. Laura Murray is an urgent care specialist at Mebane Urgent Care at Mebane Medical Park.

Dr. Murray received her Doctor of Medicine from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine in 1994. She completed her residency in internal medicine at The Ohio State University Department of Internal Medicine in 1997.

Originally posted here – 

Prevention and treatment options for bug bites and poison ivy this summer

Slideshow: Pop Con Indy 2014

Slideshow: Pop Con Indy 2014

Pop Con Indy 2014 (Slideshow)
Pop Con Indy 2014 (Slideshow)Pop Con Indy 2014 (Slideshow)Pop Con Indy 2014 (Slideshow)Pop Con Indy 2014 (Slideshow)Pop Con Indy 2014 (Slideshow)Pop Con Indy 2014 (Slideshow)Pop Con Indy 2014 (Slideshow)Pop Con Indy 2014 (Slideshow)

Pop Con Indy 2014 (Slideshow)

Indy’s inaugural Pop Con had something for the geeks in all of us: from Sylvester McCoy’s Dr. Who, to a fiberglass replica of the Bat Mobile, and superheroes and villains everywhere! It was three days of merchandise, panel discussions with the stars, and video games people could play 24 hours a day.

By Mark A. Lee

Click to View 15 slides

Speaking of Indy Pop Con, Indiana Convention Center



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Slideshow: Pop Con Indy 2014

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