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August 16, 2017

Archives for May 2014

'A poison ivy crisis,' and he's the crisis manager

Plants are waking up and seedlings emerging. Runners are creeping across yards and woodlands, over fences and walls. Ropelike aerial roots are shooting up the sides of trees like archers to a target.

Got itch yet?

Poison ivy got its name in the 1600s from Capt. John Smith, the explorer, who noted its resemblance to English ivy. Connecticut is the nation’s poison ivy epicenter, Mycka says, “but the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware region is not far off.”

It’s spread by birds, which eat the seeds. Development and habitat destruction, and our own gardening habits, are factors, too, Mycka says. We build homes and attract birds that like to eat from feeders, explore our gardens, and perch on our decks, buildings, and fences.

Duke University researchers have also determined that rising carbon dioxide levels are causing poison ivy to grow faster and produce more potent urushiol, the pale, resin-like substance that causes the plant’s signature rash, swelling, and blistering.

“We have a poison ivy crisis now,” Mycka says. “People can’t identify it and remove it. They’re so disconnected from nature.”

That was not the case with Gusoff, a retired public schoolteacher who loves to garden and tried for two years, unsuccessfully, to get rid of her poison ivy.

Gusoff, who suffers from multiple sclerosis and other ailments and walks with a cane, became so overwhelmed by “the monster” quietly infiltrating her yard that she avoided the family’s aboveground pool for two summers.

And got zapped anyway.

In August, she broke out in a bodysuit-like rash after snuggling with Delilah Mercedes, her senior-citizen golden retriever now nicknamed “the culprit.”

“She enjoys exploring the backyard. It’s a jungle out there,” says Gusoff, who finally called Mycka.

One day in late April, he arrives with a crew of three. They’re wearing long sleeves, long pants, double gloves, and wrist-to-elbow Tyvek protectors, knee pads, and boots.

(We resist the temptation to chant: Leaves of three, let it be! Hairy rope, don’t be a dope!)

Using Japanese gardening knives and serrated grass sickles with hardened steel blades, the men follow the vines 15 feet down the trunk to the base of a 30-year-old white spruce, and out into the yard.

“It doesn’t matter if you start above or on the ground, as long as you get it all,” says Mycka, who estimates that Gusoff’s vine is nine years old, 19 feet long, and 25 pounds.

A mere mini.

In 2013, Mycka used crowbars to pry a 50-foot poison ivy vine off a hackberry tree along Kelly Drive in Fairmount Park. Counting rings, he determined that the female vine – yes, there are male and female plants – was 38 years old. Cut into five pieces, it tipped the scales at 506 pounds.

“This is an interesting job,” says Mycka, who collects poison ivy books and art in his Overbrook home.

He grew up in the city’s Somerton section, always wanted to be a gardener, and became fascinated by toxic plants when he was a Boy Scout.

He signed on at the zoo in 1974 and, after seven years of evening classes, earned a two-year associate’s degree in horticulture from Temple University Ambler.

You’d think “the poison ivy horticulturist” would be happy that it’s such a problem. Actually, says Mycka, who hosted a poison ivy conference in Philadelphia in 2012 and 2013, “I want to educate people. There’s so much suffering. I really don’t want to have 20 crews out pulling poison ivy.”

Poisonous in every season, poison ivy doesn’t die in winter. Bird-dropped seeds can germinate and wind up climbing a tree 15 feet away. In three years, that vine can be 25 feet up the trunk. In 40 years, just imagine.

If you’re lucky, you’re among the 15 percent of the population whose immune systems don’t register poison ivy as a threat. Mycka’s crew is among them, but he is not.

Yes, the boss occasionally gets the rash. But, as you might imagine, he is very, very careful.

So careful that when a now poison-ivy-free Gusoff approaches to shake his hand, Mycka backs off. “We’ll do a virtual handshake,” he says.

“God bless you,” his grateful client responds from two feet away.

vsmith@phillynews.com

215-854-5720215-854-5720

facebook.com/InqGardening

@inkygardener

www.inquirer.com/kisstheearth.

Learn more

More here: 

'A poison ivy crisis,' and he's the crisis manager

'A poison ivy crisis,' and he's the crisis manager

Plants are waking up and seedlings emerging. Runners are creeping across yards and woodlands, over fences and walls. Ropelike aerial roots are shooting up the sides of trees like archers to a target.

Got itch yet?

Poison ivy got its name in the 1600s from Capt. John Smith, the explorer, who noted its resemblance to English ivy. Connecticut is the nation’s poison ivy epicenter, Mycka says, “but the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware region is not far off.”

It’s spread by birds, which eat the seeds. Development and habitat destruction, and our own gardening habits, are factors, too, Mycka says. We build homes and attract birds that like to eat from feeders, explore our gardens, and perch on our decks, buildings, and fences.

Duke University researchers have also determined that rising carbon dioxide levels are causing poison ivy to grow faster and produce more potent urushiol, the pale, resin-like substance that causes the plant’s signature rash, swelling, and blistering.

“We have a poison ivy crisis now,” Mycka says. “People can’t identify it and remove it. They’re so disconnected from nature.”

That was not the case with Gusoff, a retired public schoolteacher who loves to garden and tried for two years, unsuccessfully, to get rid of her poison ivy.

Gusoff, who suffers from multiple sclerosis and other ailments and walks with a cane, became so overwhelmed by “the monster” quietly infiltrating her yard that she avoided the family’s aboveground pool for two summers.

And got zapped anyway.

In August, she broke out in a bodysuit-like rash after snuggling with Delilah Mercedes, her senior-citizen golden retriever now nicknamed “the culprit.”

“She enjoys exploring the backyard. It’s a jungle out there,” says Gusoff, who finally called Mycka.

One day in late April, he arrives with a crew of three. They’re wearing long sleeves, long pants, double gloves, and wrist-to-elbow Tyvek protectors, knee pads, and boots.

(We resist the temptation to chant: Leaves of three, let it be! Hairy rope, don’t be a dope!)

Using Japanese gardening knives and serrated grass sickles with hardened steel blades, the men follow the vines 15 feet down the trunk to the base of a 30-year-old white spruce, and out into the yard.

“It doesn’t matter if you start above or on the ground, as long as you get it all,” says Mycka, who estimates that Gusoff’s vine is nine years old, 19 feet long, and 25 pounds.

A mere mini.

In 2013, Mycka used crowbars to pry a 50-foot poison ivy vine off a hackberry tree along Kelly Drive in Fairmount Park. Counting rings, he determined that the female vine – yes, there are male and female plants – was 38 years old. Cut into five pieces, it tipped the scales at 506 pounds.

“This is an interesting job,” says Mycka, who collects poison ivy books and art in his Overbrook home.

He grew up in the city’s Somerton section, always wanted to be a gardener, and became fascinated by toxic plants when he was a Boy Scout.

He signed on at the zoo in 1974 and, after seven years of evening classes, earned a two-year associate’s degree in horticulture from Temple University Ambler.

You’d think “the poison ivy horticulturist” would be happy that it’s such a problem. Actually, says Mycka, who hosted a poison ivy conference in Philadelphia in 2012 and 2013, “I want to educate people. There’s so much suffering. I really don’t want to have 20 crews out pulling poison ivy.”

Poisonous in every season, poison ivy doesn’t die in winter. Bird-dropped seeds can germinate and wind up climbing a tree 15 feet away. In three years, that vine can be 25 feet up the trunk. In 40 years, just imagine.

If you’re lucky, you’re among the 15 percent of the population whose immune systems don’t register poison ivy as a threat. Mycka’s crew is among them, but he is not.

Yes, the boss occasionally gets the rash. But, as you might imagine, he is very, very careful.

So careful that when a now poison-ivy-free Gusoff approaches to shake his hand, Mycka backs off. “We’ll do a virtual handshake,” he says.

“God bless you,” his grateful client responds from two feet away.

vsmith@phillynews.com

215-854-5720215-854-5720

facebook.com/InqGardening

@inkygardener

www.inquirer.com/kisstheearth.

Learn more

Read More:

'A poison ivy crisis,' and he's the crisis manager

Outdoor Summer Activities Prompt Peak in Visits to Urgent Care

MORGANTOWN, W.Va.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

With the “unofficial” start of summer upon us, urgent care centers anticipate peaks in ailments related to warm weather and traditional summer outdoor activities. MedExpress, an urgent care provider serving over two million patients a year at 129 centers in nine states, traditionally sees peaks in summer ailments across a wide range of categories including sunburns, accidents, dehydration, heat stroke and exhaustion, bee stings, poison ivy and bug bites.

“It’s no surprise that summer and warm weather bring an increase in accidents and outdoor-related illnesses and injuries,” said Thomas Pangburn, M.D., MedExpress. “We see predictable upticks this time of year in everything from sunburn and bug bites to injuries caused by outdoor activities or home improvement projects. In 2013, from March to July alone, we saw an 85% increase in the number of insect and allergic-related visits.”

Many summer ailments can be easily avoided by following a few summer safety tips, however if unsure about the severity of an issue, always consult a health care professional to discern the best treatment option. Urgent care centers often offer extended weekday and weekend hours to assist with unexpected summer ailments.

Burns
Avoid the sun between the hours of 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. when the sun is at its strongest. Remember to wear light, breathable fabric and apply at least a 30 SPF sunscreen, even on overcast days.

Heat Exhaustion
Heat exhaustion occurs when the body is unable to efficiently cool itself to maintain a normal body temperature. Dehydration, alcohol use and overdressing also prevent the body from cooling itself correctly. Heat cramps, indicated by heavy sweating, fatigue thirst and muscle cramps, are the first stage of heat exhaustion. Rest in a cooler location, drink cool fluids, apply cool water to the skin and rest with legs elevated above heart level.

Bites and Stings
The symptoms of insect bites and stings vary depending on the severity of the body’s reaction to the insect’s venom. Most mild bites and stings can be treated by applying a cold pack or hydrocortisone cream. Refrain from scratching, which can lead to infection.

Community-based urgent care centers are staffed by licensed physicians and full medical support teams to help patients find relief. With no appointments necessary and most insurance accepted, each facility can treat injuries and illnesses, including broken bones, cuts, burns, colds and flu. They can also handle lab work, minor surgeries, X-Rays and offer access to most common forms of prescription medications.

About MedExpress
MedExpress is a national leader in delivering high-quality, convenient and affordable walk-in care for those seeking medical treatment for illness and injury, as well as preventative care and wellness services. MedExpress also offers treatment for workplace injury and job-related medical issues to employers and their employees. MedExpress operates full-service, walk-in health care facilities that are open 12 hours per day, seven days a week, and always have a fully staffed medical team on site. MedExpress currently operates centers in nine states and employs more than 3,000 people. MedExpress has administrative offices in Morgantown, W.Va., and Canonsburg, Pa. For more information, visit http://www.medexpress.com.

Contact:

MedExpress

Annie Jamieson, 724-597-6059


anne.jamieson@medexpress.com

See the original article here:

Outdoor Summer Activities Prompt Peak in Visits to Urgent Care

New Vitality Health Foods, Inc. Provides Tips on How to Naturally Treat Common Summertime Ailments

The New Vitality Health Foods, Inc staff are knowledgable in the variety of natural and homeopathic remedies the store carries, and can assist you in selecting the proper product.

People more vulnerable to food poisoning include children, the elderly, pregnant women and anyone with a compromised immune system.

Orland Park, IL (PRWEB) May 28, 2014

Insect Bites

Before going outdoors, it is important to protect against disease carrying mosquitoes and tics by using an all natural insect repellent such as Buzz Away Extreme or Green Beaver. New Vitality Health Foods, Inc. carries both brands.

While most bites and stings will heal on their own, they can present some irritable reactions. New Vitality Health Foods, Inc. recommends the following natural remedies to help relieve insect bite pain, itching, and swelling:

1. Apply an ice pack or a cool wet cloth to a bite or sting for 15 to 20 minutes once an hour.

2. Try putting witch hazel or underarm deodorant on the bite to help stop itching.

3. An antihistamine, such as Benadryl or Chlor-Trimeton, may help relieve itching, redness, and swelling. Don’t give antihistamines to a child unless you’ve checked with the doctor first.

4. New Vitality Health Foods Inc. carries Sting Stop by Boericke and Tafel, both help relieve itching and redness.

Watch for an extreme allergic reaction following an insect bite. Seek immediate medical attention if airway restriction occurs or extreme swelling at the bite sight.

Poison Ivy, Oak, and Sumac Plants

The poison ivy rash can be transmitted by: direct contact with the plant; indirect contact when you touch pets, gardening tools, sports equipment, or other objects that had direct contact with the plant; or airborne contact from burning these plants, which releases particles of urushiol into the air that can penetrate the skin, eyes, nose, throat, or respiratory system. Poison ivy is extremely contagious. It is important bedding is washed daily and towels are not shared.

Symptoms, which generally last from one to two weeks, include:

  • Red streaks or patches
  • Itching
  • Rash
  • Swelling
  • Blisters that may “weep” (leak fluid) and later crust over
  • Inflammation and a burning sensation

New Vitality Health Foods, Inc. recommends the following natural remedies to help relieve poison ivy symptoms:

1. Immediately wash the rash with mild soap, but do not scrub.

2. Put a wet cloth on the rash to ease pain and itching.

3. Homeopathic Rhus Tox for Poison Ivy Remedy by Hylands relieve poison ivy symptoms.

4. Baking soda is a natural remedy for the itchiness. To help relieve itching, place 1/2 a cup of baking soda in a bath tub filled with warm water. You can also mix three teaspoons of baking soda with one teaspoon of water and mix until it forms a paste. Apply this paste to the infected area to relieve itching and irritation.

5. Witch hazel can help relieve the itch of poison ivy and tightens skin. The cooling, soothing extract will not get rid of the rash, but it will calm it down.

6. Aloe vera will help to relieve itching skin. Compounds in aloe help to accelerate wound healing.

7. Tea tree oil soothes the itch of poison ivy and serves as an anti-inflammatory.

Summertime Food Poisoning

Food poisoning is a real risk when taking food outside the home for packed lunches, picnics, camping, and other outdoor events, especially in warmer weather. High-risk foods for contamination include meat, poultry, dairy products, eggs, seafood, cooked rice and pasta, and ready-to-eat foods. People more vulnerable to food poisoning include children, the elderly, pregnant women and anyone with a compromised immune system.

At first signs of symptoms, take equal parts water and apple cider vinegar. In water or some kind of soft food, take 1/2 tsp or more of activated charcoal (or capsules if you can swallow them). Repeat until symptoms stop. Both of these products are available at New Vitality Health Foods, Inc.

Sunburn

To help elevate the pain, redness and swelling that can accompany sunburn, New Vitality Health Foods, Inc. recommends:

1. Witch hazel is an incredible astringent has been shown to have long-lasting anti-inflammatory relief. Apply often for temporary relief.

2. Do not soak in soapy water because they can dry and irritate burned skin. Do not rub your skin, or you’ll irritate it further. In order to reduce pain, itching, and inflammation, try adding vinegar to bath water. Mix 1 cup of white or apple cider vinegar into a tub of cool water. Baking soda can also offer relief. Generously sprinkle baking soda into tepid bathwater. Instead of toweling off, let the solution dry on your skin. It is completely nontoxic, and it will soothe the pain.

3. Just Aloe Gel for sunburn will help soothe sunburn.

About New Vitality Health Foods, Inc.:

Established in 1988, New Vitality Health Foods, Inc. provides Chicagoland’s largest selection of allergy-free foods that have met their high standards for taste, quality, and nutrition. New allergy-free foods are introduced weekly. They also carry frozen foods, vitamins, herbs, homeopathic, aromatherapy, body care, pet care, household items, and much more. New Vitality features only the highest quality, effective nutritional supplements to support their customers’ total health. New Vitality Health Foods, Inc. is located at 9177 West 151st Street, Orland Park, IL 60462; (708) 403-0120; http://www.newvitalityhealthfoods.com.


From:

New Vitality Health Foods, Inc. Provides Tips on How to Naturally Treat Common Summertime Ailments

Summer's poisonous plants

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ST. PATRICK’S COUNTY PARK Don’t let nature’s beauty be spoiled by pesky plants. Poison Ivy can grow in both wooded and sunny conditions. In fact, it can grow just about anywhere except wetlands.

Not everyone has a reaction to Poison Ivy, but that can change over time. The oil within the plant is what causes the irritation.

“It depends how much exposure you have with the oil in the leaves,” said Evie Kirkwood, the Director of St. Joseph County Parks.

“Most people get a little bit of a rash, blisters, redness. And it’s really unpleasant especially as the temperatures get hotter and our reaction gets more irritated.”

Poison Ivy can grow on the ground or as a vine on a tree. When it’s in vine form, it’s identifiable because of the hairy stem, which grows thicker as it ages.

The plant can also be spotted by noticing the shape of the leaves. It grows with three leaflets that are somewhat jagged around the ages.

“Usually the left pointing and right pointing leaflets have little ‘thumbs’ pointing to the outside,” said Kirkwood.

“And the middle leaflet has almost like two ‘thumbs,’ like a mitten with two thumbs.”

The good news, there are home remedies that will treat most Poison Ivy outbreaks.

Dr. Rob Riley, of Memorial Family Medicine, says most people struggle with itching.

“A lot of times people will get reasonable relief with cool compresses with a little baking soda in it. Or they can take over the counter medications that contain antihistamines, things like Benadryl and its cousins will often times help reduce the itching.”

Poison Ivy is often confused with plants that don’t cause allergic reactions, like Virginia Creeper and Jack in the Pulpit. Both plants thrive in similar environments as Poison Ivy, so they often grow near each other.

Click here for more information about Poison Ivy, Poison Oak and Poison Sumac.

Visit site:  

Summer's poisonous plants

Summer's poisonous plants

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ST. PATRICK’S COUNTY PARK Don’t let nature’s beauty be spoiled by pesky plants. Poison Ivy can grow in both wooded and sunny conditions. In fact, it can grow just about anywhere except wetlands.

Not everyone has a reaction to Poison Ivy, but that can change over time. The oil within the plant is what causes the irritation.

“It depends how much exposure you have with the oil in the leaves,” said Evie Kirkwood, the Director of St. Joseph County Parks.

“Most people get a little bit of a rash, blisters, redness. And it’s really unpleasant especially as the temperatures get hotter and our reaction gets more irritated.”

Poison Ivy can grow on the ground or as a vine on a tree. When it’s in vine form, it’s identifiable because of the hairy stem, which grows thicker as it ages.

The plant can also be spotted by noticing the shape of the leaves. It grows with three leaflets that are somewhat jagged around the ages.

“Usually the left pointing and right pointing leaflets have little ‘thumbs’ pointing to the outside,” said Kirkwood.

“And the middle leaflet has almost like two ‘thumbs,’ like a mitten with two thumbs.”

The good news, there are home remedies that will treat most Poison Ivy outbreaks.

Dr. Rob Riley, of Memorial Family Medicine, says most people struggle with itching.

“A lot of times people will get reasonable relief with cool compresses with a little baking soda in it. Or they can take over the counter medications that contain antihistamines, things like Benadryl and its cousins will often times help reduce the itching.”

Poison Ivy is often confused with plants that don’t cause allergic reactions, like Virginia Creeper and Jack in the Pulpit. Both plants thrive in similar environments as Poison Ivy, so they often grow near each other.

Click here for more information about Poison Ivy, Poison Oak and Poison Sumac.

Read More: 

Summer's poisonous plants

10 Health Woes Summer Can Bring

Summer’s almost here, and so are microbes and other environmental woes that can bring your sun and surf fun into a halt.

Among the infections that tend to come when the temperatures rise, some are mild while others can be deadly.  From poisonous plants to “brain-eating” amoebas, here are ten health hazards you should be aware of this summer:

Valley fever

Valley fever, also called coccidioidomycosis, is an infection by a fungus that lives in soil. People become infected by breathing in the spores of the fungi from the air.

This fungus is thought to grow best in soil after heavy rainfall, and then to disperse into the air during hot, dry conditions. Researchers have found an increase in the number of infection during hot and dry weather conditions, for example during drought, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

In the U.S., these fungi are found in Western states including California and Arizona, but have also been recently found in south-central Washington.

It is difficult to prevent breathing in fungal spores, but people who live in or travel to areas where the fungi are common, can try to avoid spending time in dusty places as much as possible. Most people who become infected experience flu-like symptoms, and get better on their own within two to three months, but some need antifungal medication, according to the CDC.

West Nile virus

West Nile virus lives in birds and mosquitoes, and is transmitted to people by mosquito bites. In the United States, infections tend to rise starting June, and the number of cases peaks in the middle of August, according to the CDC.

Most infected people show no symptoms, but some develop a fever, headache and nausea. About 1 percent of people develop a serious neurologic illness such as encephalitis, meningitis or paralysis, and about 10 percent of people in this group die from their infection.

You can reduce the risk of getting infected with West Nile virus by using insect repellent and wearing protective clothing, such as long sleeves and pants, to prevent mosquito bites.

Brain-eating amoeba

The Naegleria fowleri is a heat-loving microscopic amoeba living in warm freshwater, for example lakes, rivers, and hot springs. It can also be found in soil. Most cases of infection with this amoeba have occurred during the summer months.

People usually get infected by swimming in warm, fresh water. Water containing the parasite can enter the body through the nose, and then travel to the brain and cause deadly inflammation of the brain and the membrane that surrounds it.

Infections with Naegleria fowleri are rare – in the 10 years from 2003 to 2012, 31 infections were reported in the United States, according to the CDC. But most people who become infected don’t survive.

Lyme disease

Deer ticks that carry the Lyme disease bacteria are most active during the spring, early summer and fall. They ticks favor shady, humid environments, and can be found clinging to grass, in lawns and gardens, at the edges of woods, and in old stone walls, according to New York’s Department of Health.

To protect yourself from tick bites and Lyme disease, avoid walking in places where ticks are likely to live, and use insect repellents and skin covering clothing.

Poison ivy, sumac and oak

Some 80 to 90 percent of people are allergic to an oil in the sap of plants such as poison ivy, poison sumac and poison oak, according to the American Academy of Dermatology.

People are more likely to come into contact with these plants in summertime when they are more common. The allergic reaction causes a painful and itching rash, which can often be treated with over-the-counter topical lotions and antihistamines. Learning about how these plants look like can help avoiding contact.

Ear Infection

Swimmer’s ear, also called otitis externa, is a common infection of the outer ear canal that results in about 2.4 million doctor’s visits and $500 million in health care costs each year, according to the CDC.

To prevent getting an ear infection from organisms living in the water, use a bathing cap or ear plug when swimming, and dry your ears well with a towel after swimming. Leave your ear wax alone, though, because it helps protect your ear canal from infection.

Hyperthermia

Extreme heat kills about 650 Americans yearly, and sends many more to emergency rooms, according to the CDC. To put things into perspective, between 1979 and 2003 more people have died from extreme heat than from tornadoes, hurricanes, floods and earthquakes combined.

Extreme heat causes hyperthermia, a condition in which a person’s body absorbs more heat than it dissipates. Hyperthermia can lead to dangerously high body temperatures that require medical attention.

To stay safe, the CDC recommends using air conditioning during hot summer days, keeping hydrated, and checking at least twice a day on the elderly and those who have other medical conditions that put them at higher risk for heat-related problems. Also, never leave children, or pets, in a parked car.

Hand, foot, and mouth disease

Hand, foot, and mouth disease is a viral infection that usually affects children younger than 5 years old, but can occur in adults too. Patients experience fever, mouth sores, and a skin rash, according to the CDC.

There’s no vaccine to protect against the viruses that cause hand, foot, and mouth disease, but maintaining personal hygiene such as washing hands and disinfecting common surfaces or toys can lower the risk of infection.

Kidney stones

Another thing to be wary of during the summer is dehydration, which doctors say contributes to a peak in number of people developing kidney stones.

As you sweat, the body loses water and makes less urine, which allows for stone-causing minerals to form stones in the kidneys and urinary tract.

Hantavirus

This virus, carried by rodents, can cause a rare but deadly disease called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. During summer months when people spend more time outdoors, they are more likely to come in contact with droppings of infected rodents, and become infected. Also, when fresh rodent urine or droppings are stirred up, tiny droplets containing the virus get into the air and can infect people through inhalation. 

To avoid contact with the virus, people are advised to keep their homes and workplace rodent-free and be cautious of mouse activity in campsites, parks and cabins where they plan to spend time.

Email Bahar Gholipour or follow her @alterwired. Follow us @LiveScience, Facebook & Google+. Original article on Live Science.

Copyright 2014 LiveScience, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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10 Health Woes Summer Can Bring

Boomer & Carton Podcast, Jerry’s Poison Ivy Problem And MOTD: May 27, 2014