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December 13, 2017

Archives for April 2014

Experts offer advice on healing poison ivy rashes

Experts offer advice on healing poison ivy rashes

By: Ashley Gardner – Texarkana Gazette


It can happen easily.

Out for a walk in the woods or doing yard work, coming in contact with poison ivy can lead to misery for approximately three-fourths of the population who are aller…

Published: 04/28/2014


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Experts offer advice on healing poison ivy rashes

Outdoor warning: beware of exposure to poison ivy

This is what exposure to poison ivy looks like.This is what exposure to poison ivy looks like.
This picture is a classic example of someone who rubbed up against the poison ivy vine.This picture is a classic example of someone who rubbed up against the poison ivy vine.

CLEVELAND, OH (WOIO) –

Many people are spending time outdoors. Now, a warning to beware of poison ivy. Experts are seeing a rise in cases because anyone can walk right by the plant and not realize the leaves are full of poison.

“This is the poison ivy. This is the vine. It grows up the tree but it’s very characteristic and hairy. It climbs onto the tree bark,” Cleveland Metroparks Jeff Riebe showed.

Riebe knows the infectious plant well, and said there is a reason doctors have been seeing an increase in cases.

“When people are going out after they’ve been cooped up for months and it’s been a rough winter, they do more gardening and people are just more exposed,” Riebe said.

Dr Chrissy Alexander from MetroHealth says once the area is infected there isn’t a quick cure.

“People try to do things like put alcohol or hydrogen peroxide on the area to try and get rid of it; but, the oil has already been absorbed and what you are seeing is your body’s reaction to the oil.

Now is the time that the leaves should be sprouting on the vine.

The best bet to protect against poison ivy is to cover up areas on the body that could be exposed with clothing. If contact is made wash the area immediately. Also, try an antihistamine. A topical ointment can be used to soothe the pain. Make note to avoid scratching the infected area.

“The reaction can be anywhere from a couple of hours to several days,” Alexander pointed out.

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Copyright 2014 WOIO. All rights reserved.

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Outdoor warning: beware of exposure to poison ivy

Blood clot teaches Ballwin woman to be her own health advocate

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Blood clot teaches Ballwin woman to be her own health advocate

Port Clinton High School dances to 'Happy'

The Below’s of Wayne Ohio were hoping the Easter bunny would have a special delivery for them, and it certainly did. They’re getting a new bus thanks to a nearby company for free.

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The Below’s of Wayne Ohio were hoping the Easter bunny would have a special delivery for them, and it certainly did. They’re getting a new bus thanks to a nearby company for free.

More >

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Port Clinton High School dances to 'Happy'

Everglades National Park seeks volunteers

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Everglades National Park seeks volunteers

Victoria sees goats as firefighting tool

VICTORIA, Texas –

A South Texas city is looking to continue using goats to eliminate fire hazards by having the animals chomp away at heavy, dense brush.

City officials in Victoria have rented the barnyard animals over the past two months and now are looking to renew their contract with the owners of the goats for work that could continue through the year.

Officials want to remove the flammable brush at Riverside Park to prevent any chance of a brush fire, but they also want to clear land to make the banks of the Guadalupe River more accessible.

The Victoria Advocate reports the city pays $1,200 a week for about 25 goats to chew their way through the brush, which is rife with poison ivy and poison oak.

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Victoria sees goats as firefighting tool

What's Going Around – Week of Apr. 9th

If you’re having throat issues this week, you’re not alone. Here’s what doctors in the Local 6 region are seeing this week.

Nurse Practitioner Lori Lipinski at Calvert City reports bronchitis, sinusitis, poison ivy, and sore throats.

Dr. William Conyer at Baptist Prime Care in Paducah reports cases of strep throat and viral gastroenteritis with diarrhea.

Nurse Practitioner Lance Williamson at Paducah’s Redicare reports viral upper respiratory infections, bronchitis, and seasonal allergies.

Dr. Daisy Benigno in Hickman, Kentucky reports viral gastroenteritis and upper respiratory infections.

Dr. William Robinson at Murray Medical Associates is seeing sinus infections, cough, congestion and sore throats due to allergies. He is also seeing a stomach virus causing vomiting and diarrhea.

Nurse Practitioner Michelle Elkins at Marshall Count Family Medical is seeing stomach viruses, seasonal allergies, and upper respiratory infections.

Dr. Kyaw Naing at SIU Family Practice in Carbondale reports cough, congestion, and sinus issues related to allergies.

Dr. Brian Harrison in Benton, Ilinois says sinus infections continue to be his most common problem.

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What's Going Around – Week of Apr. 9th

Avoid Poison Ivy Peril


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Avoid Poison Ivy Peril

Treating Poison Ivy: Ease the Itch With Tips From Dermatologists

SCHAUMBURG, IL–(Marketwired – Apr 8, 2014) – As summer approaches and the landscape turns greener, so too are the leaves from poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac. When the oil from these plants touches the skin, most people (about 85 percent) develop an itchy, blistering rash. Although the rash itself is not contagious, the oil can spread to other areas of the body and from person to person if not quickly washed off after touching the plants. Fortunately, there are simple steps people can take to safely treat the rash at home.

“If you are absolutely certain that your rash is due to poison ivy, poison oak, or poison sumac, and if the rash appears on a small section of your skin, you may be able to treat the rash at home,” said board-certified dermatologist Seemal R. Desai, MD, FAAD, who maintains a private practice in Plano, Texas and serves as clinical assistant professor of dermatology at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. “However, if you have difficulty breathing or swallowing, you experience swelling, or you have many rashes or blisters, go to the emergency room right away.”

If you are not experiencing a serious reaction, Dr. Desai recommends the following tips for treating the rash and easing the itch:

1. Immediately rinse your skin with lukewarm, soapy water. If you can rinse your skin immediately after touching poison ivy, poison oak, or poison sumac, you may be able to rinse off some of the oil. This helps ensure that the oil does not spread to other areas of the body and cause additional rashes.
2. Wash your clothing. Thoroughly wash all of the clothes you were wearing when you came into contact with the poisonous plant. The oil can stick to clothing, and if it touches your skin, it can cause another rash.
3. Wash everything that may have the oil on its surface. Besides clothing, the oil from poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac can stick to many surfaces, including gardening tools, golf clubs, leashes and even a pet’s fur. Be sure to rinse your pet’s fur, and wash tools and other objects with warm, soapy water.
4. Do not scratch, as scratching can cause an infection.
5. Leave blisters alone. If blisters open, do not remove the overlying skin, as the skin can protect the raw wound underneath and prevent infection.
6. Take short, lukewarm baths. To ease the itch, take short, lukewarm baths in a colloidal oatmeal preparation, which you can buy at your local drugstore. You can also draw a bath and add one cup of baking soda to the running water. Taking short, cool showers may also help.
7. Consider calamine lotion or hydrocortisone cream. Apply calamine lotion to skin that itches. If you have a mild case, a hydrocortisone cream or lotion may also help.
8. Apply cool compresses to the itchy skin. You can make a cool compress by wetting a clean washcloth with cold water and wringing it out so that it does not drip. Then, apply the cool cloth to the itchy skin.
9. Consider taking antihistamine pills. These pills can help reduce itching, however use with caution. You should not apply a topical antihistamine to your skin, as doing so can worsen the rash and the itch.

“A rash from poison ivy, oak or sumac usually lasts one to three weeks,” said Dr. Desai. “If your rash is not improving after seven to 10 days, or you think your rash may be infected, see a board-certified dermatologist for treatment.”

The “Poison Ivy: How to Treat” video is posted to the American Academy of Dermatology’s (Academy) website and the Academy’s YouTube channel. This video is part of the Dermatology A to Z: Video Series, which offers relatable videos that demonstrate tips people can use to properly care for their skin, hair and nails. A new video in the series posts to the Academy’s website and YouTube channel each month.

Headquartered in Schaumburg, Ill., the American Academy of Dermatology (Academy), founded in 1938, is the largest, most influential, and most representative of all dermatologic associations. With a membership of more than 17,000 physicians worldwide, the Academy is committed to: advancing the diagnosis and medical, surgical and cosmetic treatment of the skin, hair and nails; advocating high standards in clinical practice, education, and research in dermatology; and supporting and enhancing patient care for a lifetime of healthier skin, hair and nails. For more information, contact the Academy at 1-888-462-DERM (3376) or www.aad.org. Follow the Academy on Facebook (American Academy of Dermatology) or Twitter (@AADskin).

To view this release in a media-rich version, go to: http://www.pwrnewmedia.com/2014/aad/poison_ivy/

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Treating Poison Ivy: Ease the Itch With Tips From Dermatologists

Master Naturalists meet Tuesday in Belton

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Master Naturalists meet Tuesday in Belton

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