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Archives for May 2013

Working in the yard? Beware of poison ivy

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By Ed Pfeifer


Published: Wednesday, May 29, 2013, 8:11 p.m.

Updated:
Wednesday,
May 29, 2013

Mowing, trimming, pruning, mulching. The homeowner’s June routine is a sun-dappled foray into the great outdoors and usually one of the most enjoyable times of the year.

Some of us though, after performing our outdoor labor, will begin to itch. We will develop a rash and then we will realize that the low growing vine in the corner of the yard is poison ivy. Uh-oh!

Poison ivy is one of this region’s native vines and although it prefers some areas over others, it may be found just about anywhere there is dirt.

Simply touching it results in the transference of urushiol (u-roo-she-all), an odorless, colorless oil that causes skin irritation in some 85-percent of those who contact it. Urushiol rashes can be brutal, sometimes resulting in blisters and weeks of itching and irritation.

So, what to do? Well our first line of defense against is preventing contact through proper identification.

Since poison ivy can take on the form of a woody vine, a soft vine or even a shrub, and since the leaves can be rounded, toothed or lobed, it may be difficult to recognize.

But its three leaf pattern is its giveaway characteristic. So to be safe, follow the old saying “leaves of three, let it be”.

Great photos of poison ivy are available online and studying those photos is a good idea.

The most effective treatments for killing this annual nuisance are synthetic liquids labeled as poison ivy or tough brush killer.

They normally contain a chemical called glyphosate, which will kill the plant to the root and not have any sterilizing effect on the soil. Never pull or cut poison ivy. The pieces of root left behind will sprout into new plants creating the potential for even more.

Additionally, contacting poison ivy, even with gloves, is not advisable and trimming or mowing will make airborne the dreaded urushiol.

For those of you who like to think you are “immune” to urushiol — and we’ve all heard these folks who say “I don’t get poison ivy” — I would caution you not be so bold.

Increased contact with the stuff will likely decrease your resistance and then one day you will be scratching the rash you thought you would never get. Mother Nature has a way of putting us in our place does she not?

For those of you who do get the rash, there is great news from deep in the Ozark mountains. That’s where a polite man named Charles Baker is cooking up and shipping out batches of his grandmother’s recipe for Poison Ivy Soap.

Poison Ivy Soap is a simple all natural product designed to stop the itch and remove the urushiol from the victim’s skin. It contains a large quantity of jewel weed, a common plant long known for itch neutralizing ability. It really does work and it contains no harsh chemicals or perfumes — desirable qualities all.

It’s true that tending to your home, yard and garden has its hazards and pitfalls. Nobody ever said being a do-it-yourselfer was for wimps. But with a little forethought, poison ivy can be avoided, with a bit of effort it can be destroyed and when all else fails, a bar of soap, laden with some of nature’s own best stuff, can calm its ill effects.

Ed Pfeifer is a freelance writer with Trib Total Media and the owner of Pfeifer Hardware Inc., 300 Marshall Way, Mars. If you have questions, call the store at 724-625-9090.


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Read More:

Working in the yard? Beware of poison ivy

Be aware of poison ivy when outdoors

WEST SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (WWLP) – We’re starting to see poison ivy, poison sumac, and poison oak this spring. 22News is working for you on how to identify these plants, and the precautions you can take to save yourself a lot of pain.

These plants cause painful itching and swelling. Being able to identify these plants is key in avoiding them.

Poison ivy is easy to spot; it has three leaves that are distinctly glossy looking. It can be on the ground or wrap around a tree like a vine.
     
Poison oak and sumac are more shrub like.
    
The oils of these plants usually take time to penetrate the skin, so if you believe you had contact with these plants; experts say to wash your skin with soap and water.
     
Max Salvadore, a fisherman from Chicopee, told 22News that he expects running into poison ivy when he takes his kids outdoors, and said he has his own set of precautions.

“I bring my kids in the woods all the time, and when we get home we just take off all the clothes and put them right in the washer machine, hot water. And I don’t get poison ivy too much so it’s been a while since I’ve got it so my precautions must work,” said Max.

Severity and treatment for these poisonous plants depends on the individual, and you are advised to call your doctor if you have a bad reaction or rash.

Read More: 

Be aware of poison ivy when outdoors

Summer health hazards: Poison ivy, bugs, more

>>>
new season, new you, is broad to you by kellogg’s
special k
products.

>>>
this morning on new season, new you, summer health hazards. with warm weather comes new concerns about
poison ivy
to foo food-borne illnesses. we’ve got ivy, oak, sumac. we have pictures.

>>
yeah, it’s really, really important to recognize these plants, and they all have a common factor. they have this type of oil that can can cause that terrible rash people get. and this oil can really stick to your skin, cause these small red bumps, very itchy. and when that oil sticks to your clothes, for example, it can last for years.

>>
really?

>>
so you might have a sneaker you put away in the closet and bring out in the winter and you get that rash again. so you want to make sure if you have contacted any kind of these plants, you really want to wash the clothes carefully, wash your pets.

>>
because your pets can be contaminated.

>>
absolutely.

>>
do they get
poison ivy
?

>>
no, because they have fur but they can cost contaminate and get you infected. you want to use gloves. if you see the plants, dispose of them in plastic bags, don’t try to burn it, because if you inhale the smoke, you can irritate your lungs. if you get the rash, california amine lotion, anti histamines, benadryl. but the most important thing, make sure you get of rid of anything contaminated or wash it because you can get reinfected.

>>

heat rash
. what do you do for that?

>>

heat rash
not just for babies. what happens, your sweat pores get clogged and you can’t perspire and release the heat, which then causes a rash. tiny little bumps, can be itchy, you want moisture wicking clothing, cotton underwear. you don’t get it in those moist and warm areas. al, important for you. when you do get the rash, again, hydro cortisone ointment, but
stay cool
. this is a sign you’re over heated. it could progress to heatstroke.

>>
bug bites,
mosquito bite
to
lyme disease
.

>>

lyme disease
is serious, transmitted through ticks,
deer ticks
in particular. check yourself and your kids. the tick has to be on your skin for two or three days before it can transmit the disease so you can prevent it. it’s about the size of a
pin head
, very small. if you find a
tick bite
and develop a rash, the classic rash is a bull’s eye,
red ring
. antibiotics can can treat
lyme disease
. if untreated can lead to severe neurologic issues.

>>
bug bites, deet or not deet?

>>
deet is most effective and has been shown to be safe if used correctly, you don’t want it on your hands or face, for infants under six months, not recommended. but there are some deet-free options.

>>

food safety
.

>>

food safety
, yes.

>>
so much to worry about.

>>
grilling is so much fun and picni picnics. but there are some issues. first of all, you want to be very careful with the
raw meat
, okay. you want to make sure you keep it separated from the other food.

>>
no
cross contamination
.

>>
no
cross contamination
, separate platters for the cooked versus
raw meat
, separate utensils. also be careful in terms of perishables, macaroni, salad, mayonnaise or dairy, things in the cooler. nothing out for over two hours. have a separate beverage cooler, that’s the one people are opening, it’s not going to
stay cool
.

>>
bacteria growing.

>>
exactly. and use a
meat thermometer
when you’re grilling. don’t think you can judge from the outside, even if charred on the outside, raw on the inside, use a thermometer and make sure you’re getting to the right temperature. and leftovers, don’t keep anything if it’s been outside. in the cooler, you may be able to. but if not, just throw it out.

>>
my big take-away, wicking underwear.

Follow this link – 

Summer health hazards: Poison ivy, bugs, more

Healthcheck: Dealing with poison ivy

Action News


Umar Mycka isn’t your average gardener.

“I’m a poison ivy horticulturalist,” he says, “a gardener who specializes in poison ivy removal.”

What Mycka does makes other cringe: wading into backyards and parks filled with the poisonous plant, and digging it out.

He says that while most people can identify its “leaves of three,” they don’t understand how it grows, so they get rashes over and over again.

For one thing, it takes root fast, and spreads quickly. A 2-year-old plant can have a 20-foot vine.

In one yard, a handful of sprigs above ground were hiding a 30-foot vine just below the soil.

“It was under the shrubs,” said Mycka, “under the English ivy. It was under pachysandra. Weed killer only killed the top leaves, not the vine below.”

About 85 percent of us have a reaction to the oil that’s on poison ivy’s leaves and vines.

“It does penetrate your skin,” says Mycka. “It goes into the lower layers of the skin, and it combines with a protein in the skin. You want to get that off before it happens.”

Mycka says you’ve got about 10 minutes to wash it off with lots of soap and water, or wipe it off with rubbing alcohol.

If you do get a rash, contrary to common belief, it won’t spread if you scratch those itchy blisters.

But it will be with you for awhile. It takes 8 days to peak before it diminishes.

Experts remind us that there is normally a boom in poison ivy cases over Memorial Day weekend so beware!

RELATED LINKS:

Umar Mycka’s website: idontwantpoisonivy.com

(Copyright ©2013 WPVI-TV/DT. All Rights Reserved.)

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From:  

Healthcheck: Dealing with poison ivy

The Doctor Is In: Poison Ivy

(KPLR) – The recent beautiful weather has encouraged many of us to spend a day in the woods or doing yard work. Some of us developed a streaky, red, bumpy rash that turns into weeping blisters. Poison ivy and related plants are a common problem that can be easily treated and even prevented by learning to identify them. Dr. Sonny Saggar spoke with Christine Buck about this common problem.

You can connect with Dr. Saggar, the Medical Director at St. Louis Urgent Cares, and ask him any questions you like.

.
What are poison ivy, oak, and sumac?
Poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac are plants that can cause a nasty skin rash called ‘allergic contact dermatitis.

When they touch your skin. The red, uncomfortable, and itchy rash often shows up in lines or streaks, often with fluid-filled bumps (blisters) or large raised areas (hives). It is the most common skin problem caused by contact with plants (plant dermatitis).

What causes a poison ivy, oak, or sumac rash?
The rash is caused by contact with an oil (urushiol) found in poison ivy, oak, or sumac. The oil is present in all parts of the plants, including the leaves, stems, flowers, berries, and roots. Urushiol is an allergen, meaning the rash is actually an allergic reaction to the oil in these plants. Indirect contact with urushiol can also provoke a reaction like this.

For example, when you touch clothing, pet fur, sporting gear, gardening tools, or other objects that have come in contact with one of these plants. Urushiol does not cause a rash on everyone who gets it on his or her skin. Some people never get a reaction and some people get poison ivy reactions some years but not other years.

What are the symptoms of the rash?
The usual symptoms of the rash are:
●    Itchy skin where the plant touched your skin.
●    Red streaks or general redness where the plant brushed against the skin.
●    Small bumps or larger raised areas (hives).
●    Blisters filled with fluid that may leak out.

The rash usually appears 8 to 48 hours after your contact with the urushiol. But it can occur from 5 hours to 15 days after contact with the plant. The reaction usually takes more than a week to show up the first time you get urushiol on your skin, but the rash develops much more quickly (within 1 to 2 days) after later contacts.

The rash will continue to develop in new areas over several days but only on the parts of your skin that had contact with the urushiol or those parts where the urushiol was spread by touching.

The rash is not contagious. You usually cannot catch or spread a rash after it appears, even if you touch it or the blister fluid, because the urushiol will already be absorbed or washed off the skin. The rash may seem to be spreading. But either it is still developing from earlier contact or you have touched something that still has urushiol on it.

The more urushiol you come in contact with, the more severe your skin reaction. Severe reactions to smaller amounts of urushiol also may occur in people who are highly sensitive to urushiol. Serious symptoms may include:
●    Trouble breathing – although this is not common with Poison Ivy
●    Swelling of the face, mouth, neck, genitals, or eyelids (which may prevent the eyes from opening).
●    Widespread, large blisters that ooze large amounts of fluid.

Without treatment, the rash usually lasts about 10 days to 3 weeks, but for some people, the rash may take up to 6 weeks to heal.

How is the rash diagnosed?
The rash usually is diagnosed during a physical exam. Your doctor or Nurse Practitioner will examine the rash and ask questions to find out when you were exposed to the plant and how long it took the rash to develop. If you are not sure whether you were exposed to a plant, he or she will ask about your outdoor activities, work, and hobbies.

How is the rash treated?
First strip off your clothes and place them in a plastic garbage bag to prevent them scattering the Urushiol oil elsewhere, if possible. Get into the shower as quickly as you can and wash your skin with cool water and a soap that does not contain oils. Washing the resins from poison plants off of your skin within 30 minutes of exposure can prevent most allergic reactions.

You can apply rubbing alcohol to your skin to dissolve the poison ivy or poison oak oils. If you’re outdoors in the woods when you’re exposed to poison ivy or poison oak, then you can rinse your body off in a running stream.

Make sure to scrub under your fingernails with a toothbrush in case any oil from the plants is deposited beneath them. Remember to throw the toothbrush away after you’re done. It’s no good for anything.

Most poison ivy, oak, or sumac rashes can be treated successfully at home. Initial treatment consists of washing the area with water immediately after contact with the  plants. To relieve symptoms, use wet compresses and take cool baths. Nonprescription antihistamines  and calamine lotion  also may help relieve symptoms. Moderate or severe cases of the rash may require treatment by a doctor or Nurse Practitioner, who may prescribe corticosteroid pills, creams, ointments, or shots (injections) .

How can I prevent the rash from poison ivy, oak, and sumac?
●    The best way to prevent the rash is to learn to identify and avoid the plants. When you cannot avoid contact with the plants, heavy clothing (long pants, long-sleeved shirt, and vinyl gloves) and barrier creams or lotions may help protect you.  
●    Poison ivy has 3 shiny green leaves and a red stem. It grows as a vine, typically along riverbanks.
●    Poison oak grows as a shrub and has 3 leaves like poison ivy. Poison oak is typically found on the West Coast of the U.S. although there is an East Coast variety.
●    Poison sumac is a woody shrub with 7 to 13 leaves arranged in pairs. It grows in abundance along the Mississippi River.

Excerpt from:  

The Doctor Is In: Poison Ivy

Adam Sandler uncovers maid's poison ivy attack

Adam Sandler was recently horrified to discover his maid had been rubbing poison ivy all over his body as he slept as payback for having to handle the actor’s dirty underwear.

The Big Daddy star had no idea how he had contracted the itchy skin rash, and so he turned to his household security camera footage to ensure he wasn’t rummaging through his yard in his sleep.

And Sandler reveals he was shocked to discover who was responsible for all his discomfort.

He tells US TV host Jay Leno, “It was a horrific event. When you get that as a kid it makes sense, but a man my age, it doesn’t make too much sense because I don’t even go… in the woods… So I thought maybe I was sleep walking or something like that…

“The security camera in my house, I put it on me in my bed to see what I do, and a housekeeper kept coming in and rubbing poison ivy all over my body while I slept and I was like, ‘What the hell is going on? Why is this lady doing that to me?’ So I wake up in the morning, I said, ‘Hey, what’s the deal? It’s itchy, what you’re doing to me is wrong. I caught you. Why (did) you do that to me? I’m very nice to you.’

“She went to the laundry hamper and pulled out my underwear and (pointed to the stains) and she said, ‘That’s why’.”

WENN.com

View original – 

Adam Sandler uncovers maid's poison ivy attack

Adam Sandler uncovers maid's poison ivy attack

Adam Sandler was recently horrified to discover his maid had been rubbing poison ivy all over his body as he slept as payback for having to handle the actor’s dirty underwear.

The Big Daddy star had no idea how he had contracted the itchy skin rash, and so he turned to his household security camera footage to ensure he wasn’t rummaging through his yard in his sleep.

And Sandler reveals he was shocked to discover who was responsible for all his discomfort.

He tells US TV host Jay Leno, “It was a horrific event. When you get that as a kid it makes sense, but a man my age, it doesn’t make too much sense because I don’t even go… in the woods… So I thought maybe I was sleep walking or something like that…

“The security camera in my house, I put it on me in my bed to see what I do, and a housekeeper kept coming in and rubbing poison ivy all over my body while I slept and I was like, ‘What the hell is going on? Why is this lady doing that to me?’ So I wake up in the morning, I said, ‘Hey, what’s the deal? It’s itchy, what you’re doing to me is wrong. I caught you. Why (did) you do that to me? I’m very nice to you.’

“She went to the laundry hamper and pulled out my underwear and (pointed to the stains) and she said, ‘That’s why’.”

WENN.com

See original article here:

Adam Sandler uncovers maid's poison ivy attack

Sandler uncovers maid's poison ivy attack

Adam Sandler was recently horrified to discover his maid had been rubbing poison ivy all over his body as he slept as payback for having to handle the actor’s dirty underwear.

The Big Daddy star had no idea how he had contracted the itchy skin rash, and so he turned to his household security camera footage to ensure he wasn’t rummaging through his yard in his sleep.

And Sandler reveals he was shocked to discover who was responsible for all his discomfort.

He tells US TV host Jay Leno, “It was a horrific event. When you get that as a kid it makes sense, but a man my age, it doesn’t make too much sense because I don’t even go… in the woods… So I thought maybe I was sleep walking or something like that…

“The security camera in my house, I put it on me in my bed to see what I do, and a housekeeper kept coming in and rubbing poison ivy all over my body while I slept and I was like, ‘What the hell is going on? Why is this lady doing that to me?’ So I wake up in the morning, I said, ‘Hey, what’s the deal? It’s itchy, what you’re doing to me is wrong. I caught you. Why (did) you do that to me? I’m very nice to you.’

“She went to the laundry hamper and pulled out my underwear and (pointed to the stains) and she said, ‘That’s why’.”

WENN.com

Follow this link:  

Sandler uncovers maid's poison ivy attack

Sandler uncovers maid's poison ivy attack

Adam Sandler was recently horrified to discover his maid had been rubbing poison ivy all over his body as he slept as payback for having to handle the actor’s dirty underwear.

The Big Daddy star had no idea how he had contracted the itchy skin rash, and so he turned to his household security camera footage to ensure he wasn’t rummaging through his yard in his sleep.

And Sandler reveals he was shocked to discover who was responsible for all his discomfort.

He tells US TV host Jay Leno, “It was a horrific event. When you get that as a kid it makes sense, but a man my age, it doesn’t make too much sense because I don’t even go… in the woods… So I thought maybe I was sleep walking or something like that…

“The security camera in my house, I put it on me in my bed to see what I do, and a housekeeper kept coming in and rubbing poison ivy all over my body while I slept and I was like, ‘What the hell is going on? Why is this lady doing that to me?’ So I wake up in the morning, I said, ‘Hey, what’s the deal? It’s itchy, what you’re doing to me is wrong. I caught you. Why (did) you do that to me? I’m very nice to you.’

“She went to the laundry hamper and pulled out my underwear and (pointed to the stains) and she said, ‘That’s why’.”

WENN.com

Original source – 

Sandler uncovers maid's poison ivy attack

Adam Sandler says maid rubbed poison ivy on him as he slept

Washington, May 18 (ANI): Adam Sandler has told of his horror when he discovered that his maid had been rubbing poison ivy on him, to get back at him for having to deal with his soiled underwear.

The 46-year-old comedian apparently had no clue how he had contracted the itchy skin rash, so he turned to his household security camera footage to ensure that he wasn’t sleep walking, Contactmusic reported.

The ‘Big Daddy’ star claimed that he was horrified to discover the reason behind his discomfort.

Sandler told US TV host Jay Leno that it was a horrific event because when you get the rash as a kid it makes sense, but for a man his age, it doesn’t.

The actor asserted that he doesn’t go out in the woods, so he thought maybe he was walking in his sleep.

Sandler said that he put the security camera on himself in his bed to see what he was doing but instead discovered that a housekeeper kept coming in and rubbing poison ivy all over his body while he slept.

He added that when he confronted the maid, she went to the laundry hamper, pulled out his underwear, pointed to the stains and said, ‘That’s why’. (ANI)

Original post:  

Adam Sandler says maid rubbed poison ivy on him as he slept

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